HMS Raleigh

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Reaich68, May 12, 2013.

Welcome to the Navy Net aka Rum Ration

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial RN website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. My son is at Raleigh and is worried about failing and being sent home. Does anyone know what the failure rate is and if its common to be sent home after week 6. I need to reassure him. Thanks
     
  2. That's a difficult one to answer Reaich, I don't know the exact answer to your question (failure rate), but in my experience, if he is pulling his weight he will be given every encouragement to successfully complete ther course. The fact that he has now reached the 6 week point would suggest that he is doing OK at the moment, unless there is something specific that he is worried about that he has not made you aware of. Sorry to be a bit vague, just caught my eye and wanted to lend a slightly reassuring word. Sure someone more up-to-date and qualified can help put your mind more at reast. Good luck to your lad.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Honestly - anything you say won't help. What he needs to do is find an oppo and talk to them. They'll know exactly what he's going though, and they'll help much more than you.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. There is no line in the sand that is passed in order to ensure being successful in phase 1. Some have been discharged on the day before passing out as they thought that they had cracked it only to let themselves down when it mattered most. However, this only happens when the individual has exhausted the warning system and it would not be for a one off isolated incident unless of course it was of a very serious nature.
     
  5. I feel your pain as a parent the ten weeks is a killer for you as well as for your sibling. I know from personal experience what this is like . My daughter was one day from passing out when the worst happened and she failed her final muster for having a slightly damp shirt. It was totaly her fault as she had failed one in week 3 and dropped her pass out of her pocket . She had to go in front of the base comander on the Thursday before passing out on the friday and it was the longest 24 hours of my wife and my life.

    She was backed by all her officers and staff and she had to stand in front of the panel telling them why they should not kick her out for three strikes. She was very lucky and she got back classed 4 weeks . It had only happened once before in the last 5 years in HMS Raleigh so she was very lucky and obviously equitted herself admirably in the review. But she was helped all the way and backed hugly by the staff there.

    It was tough when she phoned me on the friday when her class was passing out and she was in the mess listening to it all going on thinking she should have been there . Thats when the base commander came in and stayed with her telling her to get herself together suck it up. She had done so well in her interview they were all very impressed and dont let him down by fcking up again.

    She didnt , she passed out 4 weeks later and has now passed out of phase two as an ET/WE with flying colours and she is about to join her first ship.

    The moral from this is, nothing is fixed in stone and if they want you they will do everything to keep you . Tell your son to get his head down, work hard and double check his kit every day and especially before musters. Always check and recheck everything and dont wave a SA80 arround at the range like a guy did when my daughter was at Raleigh. He was given £1.80 and marched to the gate and sent on his way.

    Get through this and love the passing out parade its one hell of a day . Trust in your son to work hard and trust the staff there because they are brilliant. The Chaplin is the man to see with all the doubts and should be taken advantage of on base . It is nothing to do with religion just someone to let out all your fears and worries . So my daughter told me anyway lol.

    My daughters intake was 60 and 53 made it out the other side. One for being drunk on base , twice. One for waving an SA80 arround , one for bad attitude and not suited to service the rest couldnt hack it. Complacency is the mother of all fck ups at Raleigh.

    There is nothing that can reasure you and its hell on earth for parents but when its over the feeling is fantastic. Next stop for me waving off my daughter on a 7 month tour in august . She is loving it , I am gona be in bits lol.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  6. Thank you very much this advice is very helpful. As a parent it is difficult. My son has for three years been waiting for this and last week failed the kit muster, his own fault. Then the group all revived a warning. He did not sleep as he was worried that he would fail. Every thing else has been fine. He wants this so much. I will pass your advice on. Well done to your daughter, I admire her. Will let you know if I get to see him pass out. Many thanks
     
  7. If he wants it enough he will pass out . Warnings are commonplace and there are different kinds as well . The chances are the kit muster fail and the class warning are completely different and not one and the same. They do like to put pressure on the recruits. Tell him once he gets to Collingwood, Sultan or even staying at Raleigh (yuk) in phase 2 it all changes for the better and it is worth it.

    Fingers crossed, Im sure he will be fine and youll have the best day ever in 4 weeks time.
     
  8. Hi Just had word today my son failed his 1st Kit Muster, he said he is too upset to talk about it at the moment mentioned something about having forgot he had some rubbish in his bag? Im just wondering without bugging him what happens next? he said he will have to do it again, I tried to be rational and say at least you know whats instore the next time, rather like failing your 1st driving test? anyway was just enquiring as to the procedure he is in his 4th week (just) hope he's ok and not too demoralised he's been waiting 32months for this, said he been prepping his kit for 2 days?
    Cheers guys
    Anxious Mum=-:)?:confused5:
     
  9. He will be given feedback as to where he went wrong and what he needs to do to remedy it. It is not the end of the world and if he only failed on leaving a bit of rubbish in his bag then that is an easy fix.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Cheers for the reply hope he can pick himself up, I hope he passes out on his expected date July 19th he will be devastated if not!
     
  11. My son failed one of his kit musters. Easy to do apparently for what most of us would consider trivia. Their morale gets crushed quite easily, my son was distraught because he hates getting things wrong and was very self-critical. Got a prize at the end for the standard of his kit throughout training.

    I've had a son go through Commando training as well; if you think 10 weeks is tough, you want to try 8 months of it.

    And of course, some of us spent a year training at Ganges . . .

    As has been said before, some have been binned the day before pass-out or even on pass-out day itself, thinking it was all over and doing something stupid.

    But it's do-able. It's been done by tens of thousands of men and women before. He has to dig out for the whole 10 weeks and keep a smile on his face, then his future career will be what he makes of it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. I know how you are feeling, my son is now in week 8 , it has been a roll coaster ride both for him and I , some days he calls and all is good and others he is feeling low and home sick, I think this is all part of the training, some recruits have been sent home because they just were not up to the standard required. My son still worries that he may fail, but I know he is trying his very best and wants this job so much, so fingers crossed I will see him pass out on 21st. My son found week 4 and week 7 the hardest. So did I !!!! . I have sent a couple of small parcels with bars of chocolate, biscuits and crisps etc in and sent a couple of cards it helped boost his mood. I know it's so hard for us mums, you want them to be a man and see the world etc but its so hard letting them go especially if like my son he is only 18yrs and then to hear that they are being beasted
    ( think that's the word) it's awful. Anyway I hope you and your son gets though all this. Good luck.
     
  13. I don't think they get a real good beasting as nozzers at Raleigh!!! Just a wake up call, so to speak
     
  14. I know its awful, he's my only child and turned 20 on his 2nd week at Raleigh its so hard for them and us, no one seems to understand ive been in tears loads but never let him know that, also the thought of him being unhappy makes me unhappy too, We fly to Madrid on 21st i will be thinking of your lad passing out (fingers crossed) Ive sent him some stuff too and i miss him like mad :sad1:
     
  15. I am pleased I am not the only mum going through this. Keep me posted on how your sons getting on and if I can help with any worries ( as a mum as all this is new to me ) please feel free to contact me .
     
  16. Come on MUMS man up, when he passes out ,and goes on a run ashore with his new found oppos.. He will be buzzing, and will not need any babysitting duties and nutty parcels from you,anymore:grin:
     
  17. I recently passed out in February. One thing I found, is that when people call home they seem to focus on all the negative crap that has happened that day or week without even realizing it. There are a lot of fun times to be had at Raleigh, they just get overshadowed by the crap times.

    I found that Raleigh was, as someone said a wake up call more than a full on beasting all the time.
     
  18. Whilst the training team will be weeding out students who are unsuitable for naval life, they will also help to ensure that no-one fails. If instructors are still the same as in my day they do put in a lot of extra curricular hours to nurture students with problems be it home sick, actual studies kit problems.

    As a father to a son at Raleigh years back I kept in touch and simply told him this bit was the worst bit, the real navy isn't anything like training. Training is the foundation that will last throughout a naval career so it is probably the most important phase of a naval career.

    Some one has already said it, there is very little I doubt you as a parent could say that would help him through. Better their mates or instructors as they will understand exactly what they are going through and support and encourage. You have to support them but you don't really know what they are going through, physically or emotionally.
     
  19. When my son was going through Raleigh I was at sea so missed everything including his passing out parade, before I sailed I told him to just enjoy it and treat it as a game, there would be shit bits and good bits but the good would outweigh the bad.

    Just support him/her, it's all you can do. Time may be dragging for you but it will be flying by for them.

    When I joined up, my parents put me on the train for Ipswich and then went and bought a brand new telly, they was tough in them days :grin:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Deffo gotta MAN UP as Scouse said, its all about what we are going through i know, they will be having flip flop fights whilst we are blubbing im sure, I know this will be the making of him! (if he makes it) He did say before he left "Ive just got to play the Raleigh game" and i hope he plays a blinder, cheers chaps for your sound advice x
     

Share This Page