HMS Monmouth homecoming

clanky

War Hero
danny said:
flymo said:
clanky said:
Bawsack said:
Funny thing is a 32 year old Nuclear submarine did near as damn it the same running, leaving in January 07 and getting back late October, I dont remember the press coverage for that.

Don't worry, we can all look forward to doing more 9 monthers in the future.

A shipmate of mine who is still in mentioned that JRs get flown home\replaced half way through deployments. So would that make it 4.5 month deployments instead?

Yeah if top mast worked thats what would happen. top mast dosent work. When sutherland went downt the gulf for 10 months. A lot of people did the full 10 months.

They are what's known as Senior Rates :dwarf:
 
clanky said:
danny said:
flymo said:
clanky said:
Bawsack said:
Funny thing is a 32 year old Nuclear submarine did near as damn it the same running, leaving in January 07 and getting back late October, I dont remember the press coverage for that.

Don't worry, we can all look forward to doing more 9 monthers in the future.

A shipmate of mine who is still in mentioned that JRs get flown home\replaced half way through deployments. So would that make it 4.5 month deployments instead?

Yeah if top mast worked thats what would happen. top mast dosent work. When sutherland went downt the gulf for 10 months. A lot of people did the full 10 months.

They are what's known as Senior Rates :dwarf:

Funny that, mate of mine (a POWEA) came home for a month on that deployment ;)
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
clanky said:
janner said:
Without wanting to get into an us and them argument thought the following may be of some interest to the younger generation.

1960 - 1970.

If you went married accompanied draft to say Singapore the draft was for two and a half years. Communication home by snail mail or landline telephone (cost around £1 a minute and you had to book the call in advance). (compare the cost with todays and the respective wage of the time).

Single men for the same draft (or unaccompanied married men) was normally 18 months although this could be extended.

On boats, at 18 months into a commission this meant that a proportion of the crew would change over. Those coming towards the end of their draft would often be drafted to a Boat that was returning to the UK, I suppose it saved on the air fares. If a Boat was going home there would be all sorts of crew shuffles to get those going home and those onboard that were part way through their draft off and onto another boat.

I wonder what the operational tempo was like back in those days. Acquaintanceswho served back then talk of going alongside every weekend. There is even mention of something called a "sleepy sunday"
I doubt that ship's spent 2months at a time in defence watches either. Before any of the old guard rush in to protest, I am merely making the point that there a pro's and cons with serving in both era's. Its far too easy to say "back in my day".

Boats worked a 16 week cycle where possible, six weeks out and about usually with a 4/5 day visit, one of the crap runs, you know, Bangkok, Hong Kong or Aussie. Then back to Singers for self refit and leave for half of the crew, those not on leave went into 3 watches, worked every day and did an overnight duty onboard one in 3.

Then out and about for another six weeks and back in for two with the other half of the crew taking their leave.

Operationally there were things happening in the area, Idonesians were kicking off from time to time and Boats were heavily engaged in doing things (nudge, nudge, wink, wink) plus of course the Yanks could get very irate when given the answer to "Why aren't the Brits in Vietnam?" Brit answer "The Vietcong are doing quite well without our help." A point of interest to some maybe, we were often transitting inside the closest point of approach of their carrier groups. That made them edgy as well.

Different times, different problems, Boats in the Far East were all Diesels with a hoped for speed on the surface of 8/10 knots and a lot slower when dived.

It saddens me to see the poor knowledge of some of the younger members on here when it comes to the RN's history since the war, have a look here

Britains Small Wars

it might suprise many to see that its not only recently that Jack has found himself in hot and sandy places.
 

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