help after being dudt

#61
RPC, what the bleedin hell does that mean?
Its like being a friggin spy on here sometimes, trying to crack codes.
I'm stuck with my AFCB 10, DGDM. Still I know and directions for hospitality with rum, and I learned at an early age the meaning of
WGOAACTGOAPTND. 8O :wink:
 

burnsy85

Lantern Swinger
#62
Rumrat said:
RPC, what the bleedin hell does that mean?
Its like being a friggin spy on here sometimes, trying to crack codes.
I'm stuck with my AFCB 10, DGDM. Still I know and directions for hospitality with rum, and I learned at an early age the meaning of
WGOAACTGOAPTND. 8O :wink:
Ratings preperation course or somtimes know as the RNAC
Royal Naval Acquaint Course.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#63
Yep, some bright spark suddenly reailsed that the Royal Navy Acquaint Centre (RNAC) had the same iniials as the Royal Navy Acquaint Course (RNAC) so they changed the course to Ratings Preparation Course (RPC) to avoid confusion. Honest.

One assumes the same genius thought up Logistician Catering Services (Preparation) instead of 'Chef'.
 
#64
Rumrat said:
RPC, what the bleedin hell does that mean?
Its like being a friggin spy on here sometimes, trying to crack codes.
I'm stuck with my AFCB 10, DGDM. Still I know and directions for hospitality with rum, and I learned at an early age the meaning of
WGOAACTGOAPTND. 8O :wink:
RPC is the grunters term for a callround (from the invite, Capt Y Requests the Pleasure of the Company of Lt Z).
 
#66
2_deck_dash said:
I'm not being funny mate but if you were such a top lad who only had few badmin issues, I'm sure your oppos would've helped you out.

I happen to be a complete mongoloid when it comes to maths and it looked highly likely that I wasn't going to pass the maths exam, luckily the other lads in my division took the time to help me out, in return I helped them polish boots and iron stuff for kit musters. We all made it in the end because we pulled together and helped each other out on the points we were weakest on.

The lads who were binned were the ones who didn't fit in and refused to help their oppos out.

Just my two cents, seems to me that the lads in your division should've helped you out and you should've been more proactive in seeking this help.
I had the same problem, I feared the kit musters, all ways one of the last people to go bed, more so in the field, but for some strange reason I did have a talent for doing drill shoes and boots. Im a firm believer of the buddy buddy system. You help me and I help you.
 
#68
BreathingOutOnTheWayUp said:
:idea:

Chris - As you were once in the Sea Cadets maybe you might like to think about offering yourself back at your Unit?

statement speaks for itself, if he cant get his kit right **** him.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#69
Whilst individuals must accept responsibility for their actions, or indeed inactions, this particular reasonably frequent occurrence raises an interesting social issue, particularly for lads.

In this day & age those of us who are parents want the very best for our children - we often cite that when we were kids our parents couldn't always afford to buy us things. Those of us that now can, tend to over-indulge our kids, particularly those whose parents who may have split-up are very often materially & maternally over-compensated. Youngsters are often waited-on hand & foot & it's arguably my generation's fault for not promoting significantly more independence & responsibility.

Whilst at primary school, my (female) teacher insisted all boys learn the basics of how to sew, cook, wash & iron clothes as well as the girls. My Dad wasn't best pleased, but it was a first class lesson in life skills, in retrospect. It isn't necessarily the schools responsibility to teach these things however, it's that of us, their parents.
 
#70
Ninja_Stoker said:
Whilst individuals must accept responsibility for their actions, or indeed inactions, this particular reasonably frequent occurrence raises an interesting social issue, particularly for lads.

In this day & age those of us who are parents want the very best for our children - we often cite that when we were kids our parents couldn't always afford to buy us things. Those of us that now can, tend to over-indulge our kids, particularly those whose parents who may have split-up are very often materially & maternally over-compensated. Youngsters are often waited-on hand & foot & it's arguably my generation's fault for not promoting significantly more independence & responsibility.

Whilst at primary school, my (female) teacher insisted all boys learn the basics of how to sew, cook, wash & iron clothes as well as the girls. My Dad wasn't best pleased, but it was a first class lesson in life skills, in retrospect. It isn't necessarily the schools responsibility to teach these things however, it's that of us, their parents.
I fkn hate you Ninja, you speak far too much sense :p :p
 

IB08

Lantern Swinger
#71
The fact that your oppos didnt help you out does suggest that you didnt fit in. Ive always been a bit of an admin mong but I am a nerd and my phys has always been good; so made use of the buddy buddy system in phase one.
 

cadetsmum

Lantern Swinger
#75
Ninja_Stoker said:
Whilst individuals must accept responsibility for their actions, or indeed inactions, this particular reasonably frequent occurrence raises an interesting social issue, particularly for lads.

In this day & age those of us who are parents want the very best for our children - we often cite that when we were kids our parents couldn't always afford to buy us things. Those of us that now can, tend to over-indulge our kids, particularly those whose parents who may have split-up are very often materially & maternally over-compensated. Youngsters are often waited-on hand & foot & it's arguably my generation's fault for not promoting significantly more independence & responsibility.

Whilst at primary school, my (female) teacher insisted all boys learn the basics of how to sew, cook, wash & iron clothes as well as the girls. My Dad wasn't best pleased, but it was a first class lesson in life skills, in retrospect. It isn't necessarily the schools responsibility to teach these things however, it's that of us, their parents.
Ninja

Can't you talk rubbish for a change, lol?

It's for that very reason Junior can now use the washing machine and the iron and is not a stranger to the hoover either. Still got to get through his head though that doing the dishes means drying them as well as washing but for now I'll settle for half a job.

Now I have no idea of why the OP failed to manage his time but with my little lab rat I've noticed that on occassions he hasn't quite grasped the advantages of getting up, doing the jobs that I've left him to do and then doing whatever he wants to do with the rest of the day

As for the OP's current situation, its a difficult one.........part of me says go for the appeal (if that is a realistic proposition) as I'd be a hypocrite if I said otherwise but the other part says that a person is unlikely to have changed a flaw in their character (and I don't mean that disrespectfully) that has had such a major effect on their chosen career at the flick of a switch that perhaps the 2 years that has been suggested you wait before applying again will serve you well
 
#77
i was at caldonia start of may, we never got no ironing to do


only just started to do it summit to do with previous courses asking to do some ironing.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top