Guidance Notes on Medical Standards For Entry

photface

Lantern Swinger
Thanks for the reply. I guess it must be on a case by case basis. I'll have to just leave it in the hands of the fates to decide.


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NursingMH

Newbie
Hello.
Sorry to be posting as I know people are probably exhausted from reading similar posts.
I am applying to join the RN as a student adult nurse. I've passed my RT and have my official interview in a few days time. I have been to the optician today for my test. I fall within the spectrum of V3 sight, apart from that I can't read the top letter of the test therefore I am below requirement without an aid such as glasses/contacts. Therefore my optician had to sign that I "do not" fall within the required limits.
I am wondering if there is any point in me wasting AFCO's time by going to the interview when I am already aware I am in the unsuitable bracket. The optician said the RN may be lenient regarding this but I am doubtful.
Any advice is welcome.
Thankyou
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Sorry to hear of your circumstances. Best bet? Nip into your AFCO if you can, prior to your interview and ask to speak with your careers adviser (the person interviewing), take the optician report form too.

At best you will be offered to opportunity to take an eye test elsewhere in case you have been incorrectly graded. It can happen, but rarely unfortunately. There are no waivers of the entry criteria, sad to say.

Whatever the outcome, good luck.
 

NursingMH

Newbie
Thank you very much. I am still going to attend see what happens. Do you happen to have up to date policy regarding applicants that have had laser eye treatments? Covering which laser treatments are accepted by the RN? I am looking into having them surgically corrected.

Best Wishes
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
The rules regarding laser surgery are stringent. Your AFCO can give you an advisory letter which will be more accurate.

Off the top of my head, it needs to be an approved type of surgery, inter-ocular implants are not permitted, the pre-op eyesight standards must be met, the individual must be over age 22 and at least 12 months clear of demonstrably successful surgery.
 

JKearton

Newbie
New on here and trying to find an answer, I have tried searching but nothing shows up that relates to my situation.
I have an astigmatism which makes my prescription abit strong

My prescrition reads
Right Sph +4.75 cyl -2.50 Aided 6/6
Left shp +7.50 cyl -3.00 Aided 6/7.5

Unaided i got to the third line in my left eye and fourth line with my right eye, prescription hasnt listed my unaided scores.

My concern is that my correction mght be too powerful even though my unaided is better than 6/60 and aided is better than 6/9. Would i get told to sod off my the doctor or would I get accepted to training with this prescription?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Unfortunately, only a qualified optician can give definitive advice in this area and even then, they sometimes get it wrong so unqualified individuals, such as myself is best not offering technical advice with regard acceptable eyesight parameters for entry into the Naval Service as different jobs have different standards.

Suffice to say, for entry, the minimum accepted standard is Visual Acuity standard 3 and both the corrected and uncorrected prescription must meet that standard. Best bet? Nip into your local Boots opticians (our contracted service provider), taking your prescription and ask if they would be so kind as to give you a pointer on the Naval Service visual acuity standards.
 

grentuu

Newbie
My daughter is 23, a qualified chef and is looking to join the Navy. Over the last 12 months she has been diagnosed with syncope, which is a fainting illness. She doesnt actually faint but has dizzy spells. She is on medication which is managing it.
We have called the Careers office but they didn't know whether this would affect her chances of entry. I have trawled through the net trying to get answers but can't find any. Could anyone help or point me in the right direction, or she she better just applying?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
My daughter is 23, a qualified chef and is looking to join the Navy. Over the last 12 months she has been diagnosed with syncope, which is a fainting illness. She doesnt actually faint but has dizzy spells. She is on medication which is managing it.
We have called the Careers office but they didn't know whether this would affect her chances of entry. I have trawled through the net trying to get answers but can't find any. Could anyone help or point me in the right direction, or she she better just applying?
Again definitive medical guidance can only be given by the qualified service medical health professionals once they are in receipt of the full medical history of the individual.

To do this, the individual will need to enter into the selection process to be certain with regard their medical suitability for service.

The rough rule of thumb is that service personnel have to be able to operate in extreme environmental conditions free from medication which could otherwise place a burden on those whose lives may depend on them being able to cope independently in an operational environment.

Whilst not qualified to offer advice in this area, but equally authorised to help manage realistic expectations, it is likely this medical issue will need to be fully investigated as it outwardly appears to be a significant issue with regard medical suitability.
 

grentuu

Newbie
Thank you. I've tried talking her to change to army as I'm an ex Grenadier but she's having none of it. Her granddad was however Navy for 30 years so she is trying to follow a family tradition. ;) She's going to start the process tomorrow. Fingers crossed.
Thanks again Ninja.
 
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