Navy Net - Royal Navy Community

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Guidance Notes on Medical Standards For Entry

SarahTee

Newbie
Hi, I've looked everywhere to try and find out the answer to this with no luck - having read through all the great advice you've been able to give people on here I figured it couldn't hurt to ask.

Will having flat feet be a problem that could cause me to fail the medical? And also having been previously diagnosed with high cholesterol that is not diet related? I have the option of taking medication to lower my cholesterol levels, but do not have to...

They seem like such stupid things to possibly be turned down for since neither affect me day-to-day, but in all my reading I can't seem to find a straight answer. I'd really appreciate any advice you can give me...

Sarah x
 
A

angrydoc

Guest
Flat feet may be a problem - it depends on the degree. You can find up in probs after matching for a while in combat boots. Cholesterol is ok as long as it is lower than 8. You must not require medication.
 
So quick bit of background, I had a childhood asthma problem. This has however gone away and I've not received medication for asthma in more than 4 years and haven't required the usage of my inhaler in closer to 10. However 2 years ago I was unfortunate enough to contract Pneumonia. As a treatment for this condition I was prescribed with an inhaler in order to help alleviate the symptoms of pneumonia. When I came round to apply I was told that this prescription, I was told that this left me medically disqualified for 2 more years. I trust that this is accurate, however I was wondering if any difference would be made if I had a Dr's letter stating that I was symptom free of Asthma, had been for longer than I had to and that the medication was not prescribed for that purpose?

Second question. I still want to apply if I have to wait two more years, joining the navy is what I've wanted to do for years but I'd always been disqualified through my asthma and have only recently started to see it as something I could do rather than what I wanted to do but couldn't. I've just recently graduated with a degree in law and more than sufficient UCAS points however none of these are in Maths related areas. What advice would people give of useful things I can do over the next 2 years to make myself a better candidate?

I'm applying for Warfare officer. I'm considering taking Maths and Physics A-Levels on a distance course, looking for civilian naval employment, apprenticeships in fields such as electronics and engineering (which seem the least useful to me considering the specialisation I want to become but I'm assuming people here know better than me) or general civilian employment. Obviously a combination of these is also on the table I'm just looking for as much advice as possible.

finally sorry if this is posted badly, I'm new
 
A

angrydoc

Guest
****ing GPs. I wish they would stop giving people with healthy lungs bar a mild infection (which is probably upper tract therefore not requiring antibiotics) salbutamol inhalers. It really ****s up their application to join the Forces.

You're going to need to do a peak flow diary for 2 months to prove your lung function is normal, and at your medical you'll be sent for lung function tests. Your application will be delayed by this but there's no way around it I'm afraid.

AD
 

Stuball

Midshipman
Somebody asked about the Raleigh medical earlier and dont think it was answered particularly thoroughly. ..also I just read the Raleigh training diaries and it mentioned specialist submariner medicals...what does this involve and why just potential submariners? Ta!

I posted the above question on raleigh advice and tips but it fell on deaf ears any info would be appreciated:confused:
 

Stuball

Midshipman
Thanks for the reply...I 'am' applying to be a submariner and no the penny hasn't dropped. I will ask my afco. Thanks for deleting other post..

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
Submariners require a lung function test. The medical is more stringent as, if you need to escape, you will be filling your lungs with compressed air, also if your lungs are too small or too large, this can also affect you during an escape scenario. The medical is similar (if not the same) as a diving medical. A_D can probably be more specific than I can.
 

Stuball

Midshipman
Thank you very much wrecker! Im at raleigh in Nov so I think its time to knock the fags on the head entirely!

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
If your going boats Stuball, there's no smoking at sea so bin them while you can. A case in point, when I was a DO to Phase 2's in Raleigh I had one lad who was a tabber. He had to go to sickbay to do a vitalograph. I told him not to have a fag at least 2 hours before the test, he ignored me and had a tab 10 mins before the test and promptly failed it..end of career. Fags and lung function tests do not go together.
 

Stuball

Midshipman
Warning well and truly recieved wrecker. Practicality jacked em in anyhow but ill give it my all from now onwards. Appreciate the advice:)
 

soleil

War Hero
johnrtaylor;1157773Second question. I still want to apply if I have to wait two more years said:
Welcome, John.

A propos of the second half of your question, I was wondering why you felt the need to sign up for more A Levels and Maths and Physics in particular? If you already have the necessary UCAS Points, you don't need those extra A Levels.

Given the subject which you have studied at degree level, have you thought of considering Logistics Officer instead?

Two tips:

Get in a lot of practice before your psychometric test.

Start identifying things in which you have participated which have enabled you to demonstrate leadership potential. If you are short of examples, find a way of participating in such things from now on.

By the way, how old are you and what kind of work do you do at the moment?

Just to re-iterate, these comments are purely to do with the latter half of your post; clearly, everything pivots on the outcome of the medical side.
 
Last edited:
Welcome, John.

A propos of the second half of your question, I was wondering why you felt the need to sign up for more A Levels and Maths and Physics in particular? If you already have the necessary UCAS Points, you don't need those extra A Levels.

Given the subject which you have studied at degree level, have you thought of considering Logistics Officer instead?

Two tips:

Get in a lot of practice before your psychometric test.

Start identifying things in which you have participated which have enabled you to demonstrate leadership potential. If you are short of examples, find a way of participating in such things from now on.

By the way, how old are you and what kind of work do you do at the moment?

Just to re-iterate, these comments are purely to do with the latter half of your post; clearly, everything pivots on the outcome of the medical side.

Hi,

Mostly because the A levels that I have aren't directed in those areas. I've not studied either subject since I was 16 and feel that refreshing the knowledge would be helpful. And my logic was if I'm going to put in the effort to renew my knowledge getting an extra qualification in the meantime can't hurt. Further having them would be useful if my application is unsuccessful for any reason in Applying for other things.

Honestly a part of it is just that when I read through the information given i thought that Warfare Officer sounded more up my street. However with 2 years to consider it I'll be looking closely at all of my options over that time.

Thanks for the advice, I was President of a university society which organised public events and inter society events as well as chairing a regional coordinating body for debating. I'm also looking to try to do some voluntary work to help out with recent experience in that area.

I've only just finished university so I'm applying for jobs now. I'm 22.

thanks again
 
I'm sorry if this has already been asked elsewhere, but what are the chances of a medical waiver for a mild/moderate latex allergy? I have a mild-ish latex allergy, not severe enough that it endangers me in any way but enough that it can be an inconvenience. I can't wear latex gloves (and keep the ever-loving **** away from latex condoms) but it generally isn't too much of an issue if a doctor or dentist is wearing them so long as they aren't touching me for too long and, as I said, it's mostly just unpleasant if they do and not dangerous. Would I be able to get into the navy despite this?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide here.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
I'm sorry if this has already been asked elsewhere, but what are the chances of a medical waiver for a mild/moderate latex allergy? I have a mild-ish latex allergy, not severe enough that it endangers me in any way but enough that it can be an inconvenience. I can't wear latex gloves (and keep the ever-loving **** away from latex condoms) but it generally isn't too much of an issue if a doctor or dentist is wearing them so long as they aren't touching me for too long and, as I said, it's mostly just unpleasant if they do and not dangerous. Would I be able to get into the navy despite this?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide here.
Whilst not medically qualified to give definitive medical advice with regard your allergy to latex, I'd guess it is highly likely to be a significant issue when required to wear firefighting breathing apparatus with a natural rubber facemask & when undergoing Chemical, Biological, Radioactive & Nuclear training and operations whilst wearing a natural rubber respirator (gas mask) for hours on end.
 

Bunhead

Midshipman
Hey everyone, I have two potentially daft questions.

Basically, I broke my little toe about 5 - 6 years ago. I had an X ray and was told to wear trainers for a while until the bruising went down; that's as far as any treatment went. Is it necessary for me to get a letter from a doctor saying my toe's ok now?

And on the topic of little toes, my other little toe has always faced to the left rather than upwards (literally, the entire toe faces the wrong way). I inherited it from my dad who served in the Army for 22 years so it's clearly not affected him, but will the freakish toe be a problem in the Navy medical? Just thought I'd check so I could get a letter from a foot doctor (the name for whom escapes me) beforehand.

Thank you very much. :)
 

spartacus

Midshipman
I got a call from my AFCO on Friday about my weight. obviously you have to be fit in the RN but I am only 58kg. They said I have to put on 2kg before my join up date on the 23rd. Not an easy job cause I'm a race horse trainer so I have always had to keep my weight down. Anyone else had this??
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Ninja_Stoker Overseas Applications - Guidance Notes Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 0
Ninja_Stoker Her Majesty's Royal Naval Service Eligibility & Guidance Notes Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 3
Ninja_Stoker Security Clearance Form Guidance notes. Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 122
MoD_RSS New and updated guidance for businesses regarding the end of the EU Transition Period MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Industry urged to check plant import and export guidance MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Antique industry urged to check guidance for trade of animal and furniture products from 1 January 2021 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Christmas guidance set out for university students  MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Jobcentre guidance on new national Covid restrictions MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance to help UK digital firms engage safely and ethically with China MoD News 0
MoD_RSS CMA launches consultation on updated merger guidance MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance for schools, colleges and early years MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance to support safe care home visits during lockdown MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Clinically extremely vulnerable receive updated guidance in line with new national restrictions MoD News 0
MoD_RSS CMA issues draft guidance on consumer law for IVF sector MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Civil/crime news: legal guidance to prepare for 1 January 2021 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Nudge to knowledge: Government to boost pensions guidance take-up MoD News 0
MoD_RSS COVID-19: Additional guidance added MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance published to support commercial fishers, merchants and exporters from 1 January 2021 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New funding and guidance to improve housing support for vulnerable people MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Crime news: online guidance for sending hearing fees rollout MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Guidance for GPs to access extra flu vaccines as part of expanded vaccination programme MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance on £9 billion Job Retention Bonus, set to benefit millions of businesses MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Guidance to parents and guardians: when you should book a coronavirus test for your child MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Civil news: HPCDS guidance updated as courts restart work MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Civil news: revised expert witness guidance available MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Fashion industry alerted to new guidance for trade of animal products MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Crime news: updated Crown Court fee guidance and new claim forms MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Updated guidance for universities ahead of reopening MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance for British Nuclear Test Veterans MoD News 4
MoD_RSS Disabled people exempt from wearing face coverings under new government guidance MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Applying SSRO guidance to costs affected by COVID-19 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Building regulations and fire safety procedural guidance: circular letter 15 July 2020 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance for reopening of museums, galleries and the heritage sector MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New government guidance supports reopening of tourism and visitor attractions on July 4 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Plans to ease guidance for over 2 million shielding MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Crime news: secure file exchange ‘sign-up’ guidance available MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Government publishes aviation COVID-19 guidance MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Regulator updates guidance on Value for Money metrics MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Government guidance to help Britain's top sportsmen and women to return to training safely MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance on moving home MoD News 1
MoD_RSS New guidance on spending time outdoors MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Coronavirus (COVID-19): new transport guidance for passengers and operators MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance published to ensure transport network is safe for those who need to use it MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance launched to help get Brits safely back to work MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Guidance published for Small-Scale Manufacturers of COVID-19 Personal Protective Equipment MoD News 0
MoD_RSS A statement on our updated guidance for private candidates MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New guidance for social landlords on essential moves MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Digital minister urges parents to follow new guidance to keep children safe online during lockdown MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Traffic Commissioners issue guidance on remote auditing during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Guidance updated to support the safe management of funerals MoD News 0
Similar threads


















































Latest Threads

New Posts

Top