From memory

Chris P

War Hero
This talk of SAR aircrewman saving aeroplane drivers reminded me of a leading aircrew diver on 848. His name was Kevin Overstall from memory, he had been awarded for a rescue in the Irish Sea off BY in the days of the old rubber band driven Whirlwind SAR cab, a Hunter T7 had ditched in the oggin in some pretty rough conditions both jockeys got out and I think may have been some injuries, he jumped in to assist winching and getting the strop on to these guys, unfortunately conditions were such that the SAR could only take one at a time so he remained in the water with the lesser of the two injured pilots whilst the SAR took the first one back and returned for the second who was the winched out and the SAR then returned to BY with the second leaving our SARD on his own before coming back to pick him up, pretty gutsy thing to do, I know he didn't have much option in the circumstances but gutsy nevertheless.
 

Waspie

War Hero
This talk of SAR aircrewman saving aeroplane drivers reminded me of a leading aircrew diver on 848. His name was Kevin Overstall from memory, he had been awarded for a rescue in the Irish Sea off BY in the days of the old rubber band driven Whirlwind SAR cab, a Hunter T7 had ditched in the oggin in some pretty rough conditions both jockeys got out and I think may have been some injuries, he jumped in to assist winching and getting the strop on to these guys, unfortunately conditions were such that the SAR could only take one at a time so he remained in the water with the lesser of the two injured pilots whilst the SAR took the first one back and returned for the second who was the winched out and the SAR then returned to BY with the second leaving our SARD on his own before coming back to pick him up, pretty gutsy thing to do, I know he didn't have much option in the circumstances but gutsy nevertheless.
It was pretty much SOP leaving the diver. Never been involved in an actual as 819 never carried SARD's. But crew room banter told many dit's of the divers being left behind while the cab retuned to drop off casualties then return. (Edited to add, the helo crew would drop a 'smoke and flame' float on the divers position to make the position easier to find on their return. The smoke and flame float would burn for approx 1 Hr.) It was also SOP that crewmen acting as winch men, (end of the wire/dope on a rope), would be left behind too. Usually in a life raft if at sea, often on cliffs or in remote areas. I was left on 'The Cobler' West of Loch Lomond with a casualty with multiple injuries whilst the aircraft returned back to Glasgow for fuel. Gets lonely on the side of a mountain with no comms and no assistance!!!! (Guy survived but it was touch and go - nearly lost him twice).
 
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Chris P

War Hero
Very quiet guy, would spend a lot of time in the workshop area of the hangar weight training, nobody would've known, I saw the signal as I worked in Flyco most of the commission.
 

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