Fleet air arm question :)

Pontius

War Hero
Besides swaggering, sleeping, attempting to sleep during daytime hours without the Commander finding out and telling you off, getting lost on the boat because you've gone below 2 deck and not in the direction of the Wardroom (whilst swaggering some more) and bronzing in your WAFU special clicky bed, there is a fair bit to do and I can't really remember ever being bored on the carrier, with nothing to do.

As everyone will always point out; you're an officer first and then a pilot (or a weirdo first and then an observer who, nevertheless, has to pretend to be an officer). You'll have the joys of running a division where, with your Divisional Chief, you'll be responsible for the welfare, promotion, disciplinary proceedings and 'care' of about 15 sailors. Sometimes this will take so much of your time (especially when it comes round to report writing time) that you'll curse the day you decided to join the Senior Service and not mince around like a poncing lightweight Crab, whose report writing is all done by their engineering officers. However, the divisional system is, truly, an excellent way to get to know the people for whom you're responsible, help them through their RN careers and help you in your development as an officer (and, I reckon, person).

Fear not, though, for divisional work will not be it. You will find yourself with 'secondary' duties in your roles as an officer and also in your professional regimes. For instance, you may find yourself running the squadron fund, auditing classified material or ensuring everyone is up-to-date for all their drills, as the squadron's survival officer. At the same time you'll be expected to be progressing through your qualifications as an aviator. Getting 'combat ready' (as the light blue fraternity term it), getting night qualled on the boat, specialising in a flying regime: qualified flying/helicopter instructor, air warfare officer, electronic warfare officer etc.

So, all in all, you'll be kept busy with your professional roles, your officer roles, your swanning about making the chix swoon roles (they really love WAFUs, despite what they say to the contrary) and that's before you get to the socialising :)

Yes, do get involved with the ATC and do it properly. Get as much out of the organisation as you possibly can (you can always give back later in life). Get your D of E awards, get your gliding and flying scholarships, try out for the International Air Cadet exchange, shoot, camp, do the leadership courses. All these things will help you through the AIB and later on in your RN training. I'm 99.9% the AIB doesn't give a damn if you've been an air cadet or a sea cadet; it's being part of the organisation that's important and getting as much from it as you can.

In the meantime, develop a healthy fixation for the smell of rubber as you'll be living and swaggering in a rubber suit for a lot of the time on the boat :-D
 

T96a1

Midshipman
Besides swaggering, sleeping, attempting to sleep during daytime hours without the Commander finding out and telling you off, getting lost on the boat because you've gone below 2 deck and not in the direction of the Wardroom (whilst swaggering some more) and bronzing in your WAFU special clicky bed, there is a fair bit to do and I can't really remember ever being bored on the carrier, with nothing to do.

As everyone will always point out; you're an officer first and then a pilot (or a weirdo first and then an observer who, nevertheless, has to pretend to be an officer). You'll have the joys of running a division where, with your Divisional Chief, you'll be responsible for the welfare, promotion, disciplinary proceedings and 'care' of about 15 sailors. Sometimes this will take so much of your time (especially when it comes round to report writing time) that you'll curse the day you decided to join the Senior Service and not mince around like a poncing lightweight Crab, whose report writing is all done by their engineering officers. However, the divisional system is, truly, an excellent way to get to know the people for whom you're responsible, help them through their RN careers and help you in your development as an officer (and, I reckon, person).

Fear not, though, for divisional work will not be it. You will find yourself with 'secondary' duties in your roles as an officer and also in your professional regimes. For instance, you may find yourself running the squadron fund, auditing classified material or ensuring everyone is up-to-date for all their drills, as the squadron's survival officer. At the same time you'll be expected to be progressing through your qualifications as an aviator. Getting 'combat ready' (as the light blue fraternity term it), getting night qualled on the boat, specialising in a flying regime: qualified flying/helicopter instructor, air warfare officer, electronic warfare officer etc.

So, all in all, you'll be kept busy with your professional roles, your officer roles, your swanning about making the chix swoon roles (they really love WAFUs, despite what they say to the contrary) and that's before you get to the socialising :)

Yes, do get involved with the ATC and do it properly. Get as much out of the organisation as you possibly can (you can always give back later in life). Get your D of E awards, get your gliding and flying scholarships, try out for the International Air Cadet exchange, shoot, camp, do the leadership courses. All these things will help you through the AIB and later on in your RN training. I'm 99.9% the AIB doesn't give a damn if you've been an air cadet or a sea cadet; it's being part of the organisation that's important and getting as much from it as you can.

In the meantime, develop a healthy fixation for the smell of rubber as you'll be living and swaggering in a rubber suit for a lot of the time on the boat :-D
Thanks for the reply :) I like the idea of officer first as it means i will have to put in 100% effort not just for me but for those in my duty of care.

Cadets has been very kind to me since i joined in February last year. Within 8 months ive been promoted to corporal (somewhat controversial seeing as people with 3 times my service are cadets :O) and attended two camps, had three weapons trained and tested, 4 Grob tutor flights, and 3 glider flights. Rock climbing, mountain biking, bronze Duke of Edinburgh, Silver in the pipeline :D ive applied to cranwell to do the "Air cadet leadership course" and im due to be awarded a BTEC in aviation studies (worth a couple GCSE's) and another units CO has said he will coach me to go to Bisley if i put in the work.


Ive been to the Navy recruiters and they said 36 months for aircrew jobs (but i was under the impression this encompassed all jobs that involve being in the aircraft, like it means in the RAF) However do you know if its 36 months for pilot and observer? I am fully prepared to wait this long as i still have a year and a bit left of school :D

Hoping to put in my application to start the tests soon though :D can't wait to crack on and get my foot in the door

I would very much like to give back to my unit when ive got some military service under my belt, because I have gained so much from them. Its definitely an environment i enjoy where the effort you put in directly correlates to what you get out

Tom
 

Talking Baggage

Lantern Swinger
The wait for Officer jobs is not 36 months. If you get through the recruiting process and are a good candidate and lucky enough to be selected you could be in within the year. Any blah about months/years applies to Rating WAFU jobs.
 

T96a1

Midshipman
The wait for Officer jobs is not 36 months. If you get through the recruiting process and are a good candidate and lucky enough to be selected you could be in within the year. Any blah about months/years applies to Rating WAFU jobs.
I hope your right :D I have 1.5 years approx left at school, and have to finish my gliding scholarship, and start my flying one with air cadets, and if possible do Gold D of E and then im good to go.

Can't wait to have a crack at these entrance tests, and see if ive got what they want :D

Have you read any books that you would reccomend to expand my knowlege of the Navy, Right now id describe what i know as above pub quiz standard but below armchair Admiral level :(
 

Talking Baggage

Lantern Swinger
The more you know the better. Use your initiative and go find videos, books, Navy News etc!!
The more flying experience and D of E etc the better (for any job).
 

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