Fleet Air Arm in Trinidad during WW2

#1
My grandfather was a petty officer in fleet air arm during WW2 based in Trinidad. He was an engineer who worked on aircraft instruments, working on seafires. All he would ever say about his service was he had never seen a shot fired in anger and they basically sat out the war.

I guess the truth must be a little different from what he told us. I am very interested in finding out more of what they did in Trinidad and the name of the base ect.


Thank you for your help :)
 
#2
From 'Shore Establishments of the Royal Navy' by Lt Cdr Ben Warlow RN:

Shore Establishments of the Royal Navy said:
HMS GOSHAWK: RN Base at Piarco, Trinidad. Commissioned 6 Nov 1940. Paid off 28 Feb 1946. Originally known as MALABAR II - Royal Naval Air Station (RNAS) for training. Advance Party 10 Oct 1940. Was base ship until BENBOW commissioned then incorporated RNAS - Base became BENBOW and RNAS continued as GOSHAWK.
Account on BBC's WW2 People's War includes this passage (link):

BBC website said:
...At the end of January 1941, fifty of us embarked on the liner Georgic at Liverpool and sailed to Bermuda where we transferred to a Canadian river steamer to take us to Trinidad to join HMS Goshawk for our flying training. On the airfield at Piarco we finally saw aeroplanes: Proctors, a Shark and a Swordfish. Over the next five months we developed the various skills we required in our roles as Observers...
 
#3
Hi Temp101!

Welcome to Rum Ration!

I think that you may be talking about HMS Goshawk, the RNAS at Piarco, Trinidad.




Oh dear, too slow, beaten to it by NG!
 
#5
A couple of years late, but only just found the site. My interest is from the family history side. My father was in Trinidad at some stage during WW2 (I have seen a couple of photos of him there). He was probably in the Fleet Air Arm because he was also based at St Merryn, Cornwall at one time (a Fleet Air Arm station). When he left the Navy (I think in '46) he was a petty officer (electrician). He said very little about his war experiences but he did say he was never involved in any action, and the only action he ever witnessed was from shore - the sinking of an enemy ship off Trinidad. He was late entering the navy ('43 I think) because he was engaged on "essential war work" in the first 3-4 years - the electrification of the coal mines. My question is - I know his navy number (I have his original navy box with name & no.) but how do I find his WW2 service record?
 
#7
A couple of years late, but only just found the site. My interest is from the family history side. My father was in Trinidad at some stage during WW2 (I have seen a couple of photos of him there). He was probably in the Fleet Air Arm because he was also based at St Merryn, Cornwall at one time (a Fleet Air Arm station). When he left the Navy (I think in '46) he was a petty officer (electrician). He said very little about his war experiences but he did say he was never involved in any action, and the only action he ever witnessed was from shore - the sinking of an enemy ship off Trinidad. He was late entering the navy ('43 I think) because he was engaged on "essential war work" in the first 3-4 years - the electrification of the coal mines. My question is - I know his navy number (I have his original navy box with name & no.) but how do I find his WW2 service record?
http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/6C8F..._service_details_nok_application_part1_v5.pdf

http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/66F6...or_service_details_rnrm_application_part2.pdf
 
#12
Hi here is a picture of my Grandfather Lieutenant A P J Hemsley at Goshawk in 1942.
Rather different from a photo I've seen of my father and a couple of others just in khaki shorts and holding pineapples, with a palm tree in the background! My sister has it somewhere and one day I will try to rescue it from the obscurity of her loft.
 
#13
Hi,
I have a letter unearthed recently from Jose Clarke written to my mother recently deceased.
He was CPO(A) FX76370. Letter was from PIARCO Trinidad dated May13 1945. Any Interest?
I was intrigued by the first name similarity and other coincidental information, especially as he knew my mother in Cornwall, to which you have referred.
If you prefer you can email me on [email protected].
Regards
 
#14
My father, John Sampson, was at HMS Goshawk for two years until 1943
He is now 92 and lives with us in the UK!
If asked he talks a little about his time there.
He was the engineer in charge of servicing the planes for 750 squadron which trained navigators. They were very old Albatross planes - twin winged.
In this picture he is at the top right

750Sqn_Goshawk.jpg

If anyone has any questions I can ask him - though his memory is not so good these days

Andrew Sampson
 

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