Failed medical

#1
Hi
Apologies if this has been Q&A'd before only there are so many threads on eczema

My son had his medical today. He has very mild eczema which was declared on his application. It's only noticeable by us by touch (slightly rough skin) as it's so under control.

He was told today that as he's been using a prescribed steroid he must be steroid free for a year or two before re applying.
Gutted, but absolutey agree with the rules.
However, what I don't understand is why a medical was arranged if they knew it'd be a non starter.
Has anyone else been stopped for the same reason and what was the outcome.

Thanks for reading.
 
#2
I guess the navy's caught between the devil and the deep blue sea!!
If they had refused him before seeing the actual condition would they be right?
They have seen the condition and are they right????
The only way of knowing is if a condition is seen by the Navy's own medical people for a true decision to be made.
A more qualified and knowledgeable person may be able to answer your query may be along shortly!!!!
Its disappointing but as you say, 'rules'.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#3
To be fair, there is probably a human element involved and very often the medical examiner prefers to explain the issue face to face rather than issue a blunt rejection letter.

Appreciate it's massively disappointing to be knocked-back, it happened to me also (migraine).

The tip is for eczema is the individual needs to be free from any visible signs of the condition at the medical examination and free from ANY prescribed medication for the period stated.

From an AFCO perspective, whilst not medically qualified to give definitive medical advice, if aware of anything that maybe a bar to entry, we will tell the individual that "x" will probably preclude entry but we cannot stop the person pressing ahead with their application on medical grounds.

Sometimes we then get an irate call asking why the unfortunate individual was not told this earlier and all we can do is point to the eligibility guidance notes which, to be fair, few people will read in their entirety. Certainly I didn't.

I doubt it's of any consolation, but I now work in an area which covers a Naval Base and am forever getting my ears electronically bashed by emails from various Senior Naval Officers equally as frustrated because one of their relatives was similarly knocked back. It happens to us all unfortunately.
 
#4
Thank you for replying.
You wouldn't happen to know if the medical is followed up with an email do you?
He's 16 and didn't take it all in.
 
#7
Well the letter arrived and he has been told he didn't reach the medical qualifying standard for entry.

It states he can appeal but I doubt we will go down this route within the six month period as he won't have been prescription steroid free for long enough.

Is it possible for him to reapply in a couple of years time?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#9
Well the letter arrived and he has been told he didn't reach the medical qualifying standard for entry.

It states he can appeal but I doubt we will go down this route within the six month period as he won't have been prescription steroid free for long enough.

Is it possible for him to reapply in a couple of years time?
Yes, absolutely - as long as he meets the medical standards at that point in time.
 

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