England Expects

hobbit

War Hero
I did look for any earlier reference to Trafalger but no joy so here's a new thread for that remarkable event so long ago. I did visit HMS Victory many moons ago and can find no words to describe what I felt. The imagination could never conjure up the reality of the actual situation and one can only marvel at the accomplishments of the RN against a larger fleet.
May all who served remember that day as I'm sure they will and share a wee dram or two with mates wherever on the globe. Not sure about any special toast for the occasion so simply CHEERS will have to do,

:D
 

brigham600

War Hero
I shall ensure I have a tot this evening whilst I am out. I had one last night in one of my old pickle night glasses, but tonight is the correct evening to remember the bravery honour of those men.

As SF rightly stated - The immortal memory
 
I sat tonight ( a day late due to work) listening to Richard Baker describing the battle of Trafalgar to the back drop the the royal marine band. This piece of music never fails to send shivers down my spine.

It's Sunset that always gets me, was played at my grandad ( ex boot neck) funeral and reduces me to tears no matter what.

I'm happy to think that at 27 I'm one of the few younger generation that bothers to cremerate such an occasion ( got very mad at cadets not so much as an evening pray as a tot in the wardroom to comrirate).
 
I think that we have to keep commemorating Trafalgar Day for all time. Its one of the RN's earliest real acheivements and a big one for traditions.


The Immortal Memory
 

Muffler

Badgeman
Hardy was a big lad over 6` tall which was unusual for them days.

Tis said the final words were “Kiss me Loftyâ€.


……….
 
Greenie said:
I think that we have to keep commemorating Trafalgar Day for all time. Its one of the RN's earliest real acheivements and a big one for traditions.


The Immortal Memory

Trafalgar rather than being an early real achievement was the crescendoat the end of one of the most succesful naval campaigns ever. It was based on a political system that had been set up to favour the development of trade and industry and that had required an effective navy. The UK had benefited from both the streamlining of the fiscal collection system under the Stuarts and a government optimised to develop the trading and industrial capacity of the nation which meant that not only was a powerful navy needed, it could be afforded (perhaps this would indicate some of the failures we have politicaly today). To satisfy this political need the navy had developed a command system which allowed it's senior officers afloat the scope to succeed. If you then add to this a tactical genius like Nelson then a Trafalgar scale victory becomes almost inevitable. Yes Nelson was the best, but he was the best of a very good bunch, there were others who would have wonTrafalgar, but probably not as descisively.

Peter
 

dubaipusser

Lantern Swinger
Hear Hear Peter. And a lot of exceptional achievements since then as well inspired by the example set by NELSON and the Fleet at Trafalgar and before.

Of interest is how many successes have been achieved despite 'improvements in communications' that have allowed our politicos to increasingly 'meddle' in matters that don't concern them.

When the politicians fail the military has to step in to put things right - shouldn't that be the cue for politicians to wind their necks in, provide support but otherwise 'shut up'?
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Muffler said:
Hardy was a big lad over 6` tall which was unusual for them days.

Tis said the final words were “Kiss me Loftyâ€.


……….

Actually the full quote was:

"Kiss me Lofty"
[slurp]
"Ere, no tongues - but I'll turn a blind eye to that!"
 
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