Engineer Officer roles - any STEM degree now considered?

#1
During a quick glance at the AE, ME and WE pages on the official site today, I note that:

"All Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) degrees will be considered"

When did this change? It always used to be that you needed at least a BSc/BEng with significant maths content (maths/physics/engineering) to fulfil the requirements for the accrediting body for chartership.

Does this mean Joe Bloggs with a 2:2 Marine Biology degree could hypothetically be an RN engineer? Or is there some form of degree assessment, with maths content still being a requirement? @Ninja_Stoker
 
#4
Engineers by trade should be able to do sums, the Engineering Institutes insist that must have a level of competency at maths, stands to reason that RN engineers should also be competent at maths.
 
#5
Engineers by trade should be able to do sums, the Engineering Institutes insist that must have a level of competency at maths, stands to reason that RN engineers should also be competent at maths.
Which was curious when on Mech's course we were being 'taught' Level 3 (quite advanced) by a geography graduate. After complaints, we eventually got Taff the Graph. Still hate maths though.
 

Seadog

War Hero
Moderator
#6
For the OP, a marine biology degree will not meet the educational requirements for IEng or CEng. Which is what -I reckon - Sumo is saying.
 
#7
Agreed.

My issue is the info on the website WAS clear (i.e. degrees accredited by engineering council only) until very recently, and is now ambiguous - as, I'm sure you know, STEM encompasses all sorts of subjects from astronomy to my rather ridiculous example of Marine Biology.

So, I wondered if there had been a recent policy change to the educational criteria to warrant any change on the website, otherwise what was the point in doing so?

From the Engineering Council:

"Applicants who do not have exemplifying qualifications may demonstrate the required knowledge and understanding in other ways, but must clearly demonstrate they have achieved the same level of knowledge and understanding as those with exemplifying qualifications. Ways to demonstrate this include:
• Taking further qualifications, in whole or in part, as specified by the institution to which they are applying
• Completing appropriate work-based or experiential learning
• Writing a technical report, based on their experience, and demonstrating their knowledge and understanding of engineering principles "

From the above, it seems plausible the RN could provide this, which is why I didn't want to discount the possibility. If it is the case that the engineering recruitment net has been expanded (a la schoolies' degree requirement a few years ago) then we need to communicate this properly to STEM graduates.
 
#8
I've been searching the forums trying to find an answer to this myself, having also seen the bit on the website. I rang the AFCO today and they don't seem to know.

I'm really interested in the Weapon Engineer role. Sadly the closest thing I've done to "engineering" at degree level is genetic engineering (biochemistry). I assumed I would have to be an engineering graduate but now it mentions all STEM degrees.

Would also be interested to know what the level of comms/sensors/weapons theory is on SEMC(WE), I've heard a few people say that officers don't do much engineering and don't use much of the stuff from their (engineering) degree. Can anyone clarify?

Cheers
 
#9
I've been searching the forums trying to find an answer to this myself, having also seen the bit on the website. I rang the AFCO today and they don't seem to know.

I'm really interested in the Weapon Engineer role. Sadly the closest thing I've done to "engineering" at degree level is genetic engineering (biochemistry). I assumed I would have to be an engineering graduate but now it mentions all STEM degrees.

Would also be interested to know what the level of comms/sensors/weapons theory is on SEMC(WE), I've heard a few people say that officers don't do much engineering and don't use much of the stuff from their (engineering) degree. Can anyone clarify?

Cheers
BR3 says the following:

**********************************************************************************************************************

c. Engineer. All degrees which are accredited by the Engineering Council at CEng or IEng level are acceptable for entry into the Royal Navy as an Engineer Officer. Notwithstanding this, the following preferences exist for subject matter:

(1) WE/WESM. UK-recognised first degree in Electrical/Electronic Engineering, Computer Science, network or systems architecture disciplines; also candidates with broader engineering, communications and telecommunications that are accredited by the IET, accredited to CEng or IEng level.

(2) ME/MESM. UK-recognised first degree in Mechanical or Marine Engineering accredited to CEng or IEng level.

(3) AE. UK-recognised first degree accredited to CEng or IEng level in Electrical, Electronic or Mechanical Engineering or an Aeronautically related degree similarly accredited. However, if the number of applicants exceeds the places available, primacy will normally be afforded to those holding aeronautically related qualifications.

(4) E(TM). UK-recognised honours degree in any subject.

(5) For WE/WESM, ME/MESM and AE the route to Incorporated or Charted status is clearly defined. Provided that the degree studied is recognised by the Engineering Council, the Royal Navy’s training package for Engineer Officers meets their requirements for corporate membership.

*********************************************************************************************************************

I know of someone who joined as a WEO with a degree in Physics.

The ultimate decider as to what is acceptable as a degree for the purposes of joining as an Officer is the AIB. Your best bet is probably to get in touch with the ACLO who covers your area and ask him/her to consult the AIB to verify whether your particular degree would be accepted.
 

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