eczema

Siddy

Newbie
thanks very much for the replies its just the doc didn't seem to think they'd pass me, I'll let you know how I get on cheers again!
 

Siddy

Newbie
Absolutely gutted, any opinions on whether I've got a case to appeal would be welcome
 

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Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Absolutely gutted, any opinions on whether I've got a case to appeal would be welcome
If you have the visible condition stated then I'm afraid it would be impossible to claim otherwise.

An appeal would only be considered if there was a medical history of several years symptom & treatment free. An appeal because you don't like the decision is unfortunately pointless.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
It's just the treatment stated isn't directly related to the condition I've been PMU for
There is no grounds for appeal if there's a visually apparent skin condition diagnosed as eczema. If you can prove it's not eczema with indisputable medical evidence, crack on...but if you claim it's an allergic reaction, that's a permanent bar.
 

Siddy

Newbie
Alright, thankyou very much Ninja for all the help/advice and good luck to everyone on here. Hope you get on better than I have!
 
Hi all

Does anybody know the definition of "chronic" in terms of the updated medical guidance for skin disorders?

I am a new applicant for the Navy Reserves who had already affirmed and passed all tests only to subsequently fail my entry medical on the basis of some very minor eczema I've had within the last 3 years. Absolutely gutted by it as you can imagine, particularly as given my age (35) this would almost certainly preclude me from entering the service and missing out on a lifelong ambition and amzing experience.

I have decided that I'm going to appeal the decision (for the sake of writing a letter I may as well and when I spoke to the CA post medical he said that it may be worth doing) so Im aware I cant appeal against the standard itself (albeit it seems ridiculous to me!) and have obtained details of my medical notes and confirmation from my Dr to include these along with a covering letter. I want to be able to say in the appeal that the condition is not "chronic" as per the new guidance (which does not give any specific dates on the activity of eczema, just that a precluding condition is "chronic eczema/dermatitis"). I have never been formally diagnosed with eczema, albeit somewhere in the notes there is mention of the word "eczema" :(.

Any advice here would be much appreciated.

Cheers
 
D

Deleted 24213

Guest
Normally you need to be TOTALLY free from eczema, for at least two years, before entry due to the fact that the service environment is one that would make eczema flare up, even if it's just a little!
 

nemesis1066

Lantern Swinger
Whilst writing a letter 'just for the sake of it' might sound like a good idea to you, if you have an active condition then you have no grounds for appeal. As a basic answer, if you have symptoms, confirmed by a medical professional, then an appeal is futile.

Chronic can mean many things - period of the symptoms, number of occurences or a mixture of the two. In the case of the rules and regulations, a single episode will result in a deferment until you are symptom free - the Service will not take that risk on you forma just in case it never happens again.

Sorry to be a downer, but it is what it is.
 
No that's OK nemesis..as it goes I realised that this may be completely futile a while ago and have partially come to terms with rejection and prepared to sit by for 3 years and try again if i still want it then.

I spent most of today drafting up a letter trying to explain away hard facts, which of course I cannot, but futile or not it doesn't feel right sitting here and not doing anything. So half of me thinks appeal and I can't be in a worse situ than am now anyway but the other half thinks just ride it out. I think I've resolved to try and arrange a meeting with the AFCO CA who was a pretty pragmatic guy and see what he thinks the chances are.
 
The problem is I no longer have any symptoms but I have had within the last 3 years. The guidance says "chronic" eczema but there is no guidance to say when I'm considered symptom free whereas previously there was...so I guess I'm wondering whether the service will take a hard line view on it or not?
 

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