Drink Yachting.......... to be outlawed

#1
I thought a news item I've just encountered may be of interest to my fellow RNSA folk and others besides.

The Government are planning to extend the law prohibiting drinking whilst operating a yacht to gentlemen (ie amateur) yachties. The law, introduced in 2004, currently applies only to professionals.

I hope I have always behaved correctly (as crew, I should point out) by quaffing the wine and shellfish, etc only after mooring in late afternoon/early evening.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/low/uk_politics/6749253.stm
 
#2
I'd like to see that enforced during Cowes Week. Did I miss what the penalty will be? Can't exactly lose your licence. I agree with you, excessive alcohol only once secure alongside - but a stubby or 2 on a warm afternoon? Should be allowed.
 
#3
Let's hope that drinking and boating laws are never properly enforced in the US. It is one of life's small pleasures to watch the criminally incompetent and rat-arsed attempt to navigate the ICW. Usually at high speed.



Bummer :thumright:

RM
 
#4
Bergen said:
Let's hope that drinking and boating laws are never properly enforced in the US. It is one of life's small pleasures to watch the criminally incompetent and rat-arsed attempt to navigate the ICW. Usually at high speed.



Bummer :thumright:

RM
What had you been drinking Bergs??!! :wink: Obviously NOT Budweiser!
 
#5
Seems to me that in some countries any monkey with enough nuts can buy the most fearful of boats and take to the water.
A lot of other countries have compulsory training and insurance regimes, which must have cut down the annual attrition a bit.
Less dodgy decisions based on half a bottle will be welcome.
ps I'd change the first word of the name of that boat to 'Lifelong'.
 
#6
Always_a_Civvy said:
Bergen said:
Let's hope that drinking and boating laws are never properly enforced in the US. It is one of life's small pleasures to watch the criminally incompetent and rat-arsed attempt to navigate the ICW. Usually at high speed.



Bummer :thumright:

RM
What had you been drinking Bergs??!! :wink: Obviously NOT Budweiser!

If you ever saw the chemical factory on the outskirts of Houston where Bugslider is concocted then you wouldn't touch it with a barge-pole either AAC.

I try to stick with Mexican beer with lime and it must work 'cos I haven't caught Scurvy yet.



Bummer :thumright:

RM
 
#7
sussex2 said:
Seems to me that in some countries any monkey with enough nuts can buy the most fearful of boats and take to the water.
A lot of other countries have compulsory training and insurance regimes, which must have cut down the annual attrition a bit.
Less dodgy decisions based on half a bottle will be welcome.
ps I'd change the first word of the name of that boat to 'Lifelong'.
I think that it was changed to HMS Nottingham........but that's only a rumour :bball:
 
#8
Bergen said:
sussex2 said:
Seems to me that in some countries any monkey with enough nuts can buy the most fearful of boats and take to the water.
A lot of other countries have compulsory training and insurance regimes, which must have cut down the annual attrition a bit.
Less dodgy decisions based on half a bottle will be welcome.
ps I'd change the first word of the name of that boat to 'Lifelong'.
I think that it was changed to HMS Nottingham........but that's only a rumour :bball:
Que malo!
 
#9
I wonder if it will apply to narrowboats as well, since most are over 23ft (usually 68ft when full length), and although the limit on the cut is 4mph, most diesel powered boats can manage 7kts, eg on the Severn, Mersey, Trent etc. However, since there are pubs every few miles on most canals and anyone who has been on one can attest its practically illegal not to drink all day, leading to many "incidents" around locks and bridges, what are the chances of plod breathalysing punters in a new round of revenue capture? Canaldrifter beware of speed traps!! :nemo:
 

wet_blobby

War Hero
Moderator
#10
Ships_Cat said:
I wonder if it will apply to narrowboats as well, since most are over 23ft (usually 68ft when full length), and although the limit on the cut is 4mph, most diesel powered boats can manage 7kts, eg on the Severn, Mersey, Trent etc. However, since there are pubs every few miles on most canals and anyone who has been on one can attest its practically illegal not to drink all day, leading to many "incidents" around locks and bridges, what are the chances of plod breathalysing punters in a new round of revenue capture? Canaldrifter beware of speed traps!! :nemo:
I got done for speeding on the norfolk broads once...woops....boat full of booties sent there to "unwind" after a tour to NI...yeah right then, on the p1ss for 4 days then we jacked it in and went home, which is was we wanted to do in the first place.
 

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