Do I bother?

#21
My ex and I have just broken away after five years - turns out she was "banging out a watch" with some dole dosser.

I hope this helps!

But seriously, If it feels right then do it. If It's meant to be you'll make it work! Even if that does mean traversing the width of the country every weekend to see eachother.
 
#22
My ex and I have just broken away after five years - turns out she was "banging out a watch" with some dole dosser.

I hope this helps!

But seriously, If it feels right then do it. If It's meant to be you'll make it work! Even if that does mean traversing the width of the country every weekend to see eachother.
That's pretty shit sorry to hear that. Well I guess I've got nothing to loose been thinking about it a lot today I guess I can't control anything that may happen in the future but enjoy what I have now. Thank you all for your opinions it's definitely helped me and lol at some of the comments :)
 
#23
My ex and I have just broken away after five years - turns out she was "banging out a watch" with some dole dosser.

I hope this helps!

But seriously, If it feels right then do it. If It's meant to be you'll make it work! Even if that does mean traversing the width of the country every weekend to see eachother.
The term used to be-- Turn of leave out of watch with substitute
 
#25
I met my now leader when in Dolphin, both mid 30s. Her dad had told her to have nothing to do with matelots - submariners were never mentioned! Obviously lots of time away (for me) on patrol then came out and got a job that involved time away on trials all over the place. Got married after 10 years (didn't want to rush into anything!) then I ended up working Monday to Friday in Bristol.

We survived and now see each other 24/7.


Mind you, the cheap alcohol out here helps!!
 
#26
Met the 2nd wife in a wine bar after drinking 3 bottles of red. Still together 26 years later and I no longer drink because I no longer have any money to spend on alcohol, personal hygiene items, clothes, clean underwear, electronic gadgets, cigarettes, haircuts, kebabs etc etc etc.
The first words of Italian that I learnt were,
"Si Caro!"
 
#35
No it wasn't, it's always been going out of watch!
You're wrong I'm afraid.
Stephen Roskill's Naval policy between the Wars refers.
Mutiny in the Royal Navy ADM 178/135
"Both the Norfolk's RofP (ADM 178/110/ and Wincott's own account say that he obtained a "turn of leave out of watch with substitute" to enable him to go ashore two days running. Turn of leave out of watch without substitute was another option but more difficult to achieve. This was the procedure until 1960 at least.

RoP stands for Report of Proceedings
 
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#36
Robert2's post refers to the infamous Invergordon Mutiny and he probably intended to cloud & confuse the issue so a few words of explanation might be in order:

Wincott's aim on obtaining shore leave was not 'for dipping his wick out of watch' but to incite disobedience following the announcement of drastic service pay cuts (effectively 25% for some)

<<By 1931 Britain, in common with the other major industrial nations, was in the grip of an economic crisis. The National government, a coalition led by Ramsay Macdonald, had to find ways of cutting expenditure and, among a number of unpopular measures, decided to reduce the pay of all military personnel...

...Able Seaman Leonard Wincott
was serving on HMS Norfolk at the time of the mutiny. He became one of the men’s leaders and was the author of their manifesto, which stated that they would refuse to serve under the new rate of pay unless they received a written guarantee that their pay would be revised. Of his involvement, he said: “Had I not made the first move someone else would have done so. The men wanted a speaker who would express their resentment at the cuts. What I emphasised was the need to strike”. Despite the Prime Minister’s statement that there would be no victimisation following the mutiny, Wincott and other leading participants were discharged from the Navy on November 3rd 1931, immediately after the General Election.

Wincott was born in Leicester in 1907 and joined the Royal Navy in 1920. He was said to be a clever man who could speak nine languages. After his discharge from the Navy he became a workers’ hero in Britain and it is thought that this is when his involvement with the Communist Party started. He was unable to find work and by the mid 1930s had left the country to fight against General Franco in Spain. By 1938 he was living in Leningrad and later became a Soviet citizen.>>

http://www.invergordon.info/TheMutiny
 
#39
Robert2's post refers to the infamous Invergordon Mutiny and he probably intended to cloud & confuse the issue so a few words of explanation might be in order:

Wincott's aim on obtaining shore leave was not 'for dipping his wick out of watch' but to incite disobedience following the announcement of drastic service pay cuts (effectively 25% for some)

<<By 1931 Britain, in common with the other major industrial nations, was in the grip of an economic crisis. The National government, a coalition led by Ramsay Macdonald, had to find ways of cutting expenditure and, among a number of unpopular measures, decided to reduce the pay of all military personnel...

...Able Seaman Leonard Wincott
was serving on HMS Norfolk at the time of the mutiny. He became one of the men’s leaders and was the author of their manifesto, which stated that they would refuse to serve under the new rate of pay unless they received a written guarantee that their pay would be revised. Of his involvement, he said: “Had I not made the first move someone else would have done so. The men wanted a speaker who would express their resentment at the cuts. What I emphasised was the need to strike”. Despite the Prime Minister’s statement that there would be no victimisation following the mutiny, Wincott and other leading participants were discharged from the Navy on November 3rd 1931, immediately after the General Election.

Wincott was born in Leicester in 1907 and joined the Royal Navy in 1920. He was said to be a clever man who could speak nine languages. After his discharge from the Navy he became a workers’ hero in Britain and it is thought that this is when his involvement with the Communist Party started. He was unable to find work and by the mid 1930s had left the country to fight against General Franco in Spain. By 1938 he was living in Leningrad and later became a Soviet citizen.>>

http://www.invergordon.info/TheMutiny
Thank you for that. My father, who was at Invergordon during the mutiny was respected by the crew of his ship and persuaded the rebellious ones to stand down.
 
#40
You're wrong I'm afraid.
Stephen Roskill's Naval policy between the Wars refers.
Mutiny in the Royal Navy ADM 178/135
"Both the Norfolk's RofP (ADM 178/110/ and Wincott's own account say that he obtained a "turn of leave out of watch with substitute" to enable him to go ashore two days running. Turn of leave out of watch without substitute was another option but more difficult to achieve. This was the procedure until 1960 at least.

RoP stands for Report of Proceedings
Leave out of watch with substitute was, and still is, the wording on a request form for a request for someone, with their consent, to do your duty for you. Fag stamps were always a good, but illegal, currency, as were tots.

Nothing to do with extra marital illicit relationships.
 

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