Navy Net - Royal Navy Community

Register a free account today to join our community
Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site, connect with other members through your own private inbox and will receive smaller adverts!

Divisional System

I spent a year as a DO before being relieved of it due to taking on another role within unit, and as such I'd like to throw in my few pence.

I think I was a good DO, and I did it by being in almost every week (I miss maybe two or three drill nights a year). Every report was in on time, every advancment opportunity was pursued, every rating was spoken to regularly, employers were telephoned and placated/filled in (in the non-violent sense), birthdays acknowledged (surpringsly effective), paperwork filed, the whole shebang; the secret is graft.

I didn't do JODMAC as it was removed just as I got to it (and as such my time at BRNC didn't contain any DO training as they anticipated me doing it in JODMAC - another example of the sheer genius of synchronicity frequently found in the RNR), but I did take a copy of BR1992 home and read it. It took a couple of hours and some iniative to really get to grips with it. Essentially, any DO can be a good DO in the RNR by just putting in the time and asking the Chief Writer/PSI/experienced DOs.

I accept that some people simply cannot put the time in, and I know that some people choose not to put the time in, leaving the unit with the added problem that the best people for the top jobs in unit are also the best people to be the DOs. My replacement is rarely in, but the DO in charge of the other half of that branch has simply taken on all their colleague's duties as well. He doesn't like it, but he's doing it, because that's what officers are damned well supposed to do, effectively giving him a division of over 15 people.

In summary, the problem isn't the lack of JODMAC, the unavailablity of training or lack of access to BR1992; it's graft (and initiative) and the lack of it from people who chose to become officers and chose to take on these extra duties.

On a side note, every unit gets the same number of PSIs, meaning the amount of help one can reasonably expect from a PSI is much smaller at the big units that at the little units; roll on regionalisation!
 
Uncle_Albert said:
I spent a year as a DO before being relieved of it due to taking on another role within unit, and as such I'd like to throw in my few pence.

I think I was a good DO, and I did it by being in almost every week (I miss maybe two or three drill nights a year). Every report was in on time, every advancment opportunity was pursued, every rating was spoken to regularly, employers were telephoned and placated/filled in (in the non-violent sense), birthdays acknowledged (surpringsly effective), paperwork filed, the whole shebang; the secret is graft.

I didn't do JODMAC as it was removed just as I got to it (and as such my time at BRNC didn't contain any DO training as they anticipated me doing it in JODMAC - another example of the sheer genius of synchronicity frequently found in the RNR), but I did take a copy of BR1992 home and read it. It took a couple of hours and some iniative to really get to grips with it. Essentially, any DO can be a good DO in the RNR by just putting in the time and asking the Chief Writer/PSI/experienced DOs.

I accept that some people simply cannot put the time in, and I know that some people choose not to put the time in, leaving the unit with the added problem that the best people for the top jobs in unit are also the best people to be the DOs. My replacement is rarely in, but the DO in charge of the other half of that branch has simply taken on all their colleague's duties as well. He doesn't like it, but he's doing it, because that's what officers are damned well supposed to do, effectively giving him a division of over 15 people.

In summary, the problem isn't the lack of JODMAC, the unavailablity of training or lack of access to BR1992; it's graft (and initiative) and the lack of it from people who chose to become officers and chose to take on these extra duties.

On a side note, every unit gets the same number of PSIs, meaning the amount of help one can reasonably expect from a PSI is much smaller at the big units that at the little units; roll on regionalisation!

Good post, well put. It's not just DO duties either - it applies across much of what the RNR does. To be fair to some people though - they leave the drill night with plenty of (unpaid) work to do, and well meaning to do it for the following weeks, and tiresome things like work and family get int he way!

It's easier for larger units I guess, where you have a greater pool of manpower, but it still ends up with the same people (the reliable, regular attendees) doing much of the work.
 
It would be a lot easier for DOs if the information like QRRN, RNR Regs, BR1992, etc. were available online.

The Army has got a lot of their regulations online at Army Electronic Library, but unfortunately they seem to have used a system that only works with Microsoft Internet Explorer.
 
Uncle_Albert said:
.....I didn't do JODMAC as it was removed just as I got to it (and as such my time at BRNC didn't contain any DO training as they anticipated me doing it in JODMAC - another example of the sheer genius of synchronicity.......

..........In summary, the problem isn't the lack of JODMAC, the unavailablity of training or lack of access to BR1992; it's graft (and initiative) and the lack of it from people who chose to become officers and chose to take on these extra duties.
I agree and disagree, yes the key is having dedicated people who put the time in, but they also require training so we are all singing from the same hymn sheet. In the dim and distant past before the introduction of the BRNC course, ASLT's attended RNAC (RN Acquaint Course) at RNSLAM. This was essentially an RNRised DO's Course with additional leadership and General Info included, (for example you spent an evening as 2OOD on a ship, and Evening as 2OOD in NELSON, an evening with the provost, driving around the fleshpots of Pompy etc. The middle weekend was taken up with Sea survival and firefighting) I have not attended the BRNC course, but talking to Subbies who have it does not seem to have any of this. The good ones will try hard to find out for themselves, the rest will not bother.
 
Some good points in here, but the regulars need to remember that RNRUs are not operational units, merely geographical centres for a national element of the Service. The role is somewhere between that of a training establishment and that of an operation establishment. That's why it is hard for DOs to also look after training, as much training is conducted nationally, and there is not always functional/task management by DOs due to the differing branch structure.

RNR DOs do not have an easy job - it is performed on top of their operational role (and as for all reservists on top of at least 1 civilian job as well). As DOs are people managers their work can not be scheduled into a neat 2-hour slot once a week as people issues arise at all times of the week. Find me a DO who does not receive many e-mails and phone calls on their division outside RNR time and I would question whether they are doing a good job.

I wish everyone would stop talking about paperwork too. Yes, the paperwork needs to be done, and needs to be done well, but a good DO does not let admin become the bulk of their job. It is all very managable if you know how, and with support from the usually excellent PSIs. This is a Unit admin issue and if it's not working should be fed up the chain of command.

DOs exist (amongst other things) to manage careers, provide pastoral care and guidance and provide 2 way communication between ratings and the command. They have a huge duty of professional management.

Maybe the issue is that with 2 weeks continuous training swallowing a year of reservists' operational work, the focus is very much on specialist training and DOs are not getting the management training they need. That is something that can be addressed nationally and within RNRUs by developing the training and support for DOs within the Unit.

This is a two-way street though. Just as there is no excuse for a DO not to know who is in their division, there is no excuse for a rating not to know who their DO is. If you want more from the system then ask for it - don't just expect it to happen by magic. Your DO will probably be very glad to hear from you!
 

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top