Direct entry aircrewman becoming a pilot? Dream or potential reality?

Discussion in 'The Fleet Air Arm' started by Kriztofa, Feb 21, 2015.

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  1. Hello. I have a big question. Okay so, to my knowledge, to transfer internally to (hopefully) become a pilot the maximum age is 26 whereas an observer has no age limit... However i have just seen in another thread that many aircrewman have gone on to become pilots... Is this true? Can you go on to become a pilot at aNy age or is 26 the cut off?

    Also one more quick one, FATs are coming up soon so can anyone tell me, is the aircrewman test significantly shorter than that of the observer, pilot, ATC? Someone on my previous thread claimed it is only 2-2.5 hours long. Can this be further verified? My joining instructions suggest I do the whole thing however it seems a generic document which has not been edited since direct entry was recently introduced.

    Hope someone can help.
  2. I would be surprised if you can become a pilot over the age of 26. The only UY/SUY aircrew I know (ie ex-ratings) are all Observers.

    There is a basic cost of training vs return of length of service going on. And to the best of my knowledge, we're not hugely short of young pilots.
  3. I did my FATs for pilot a few weeks ago. (I failed but still joining the FAA) there were 2 currently serving navy guys there, I only really got to speak to one of them in any great detail, he was going for observer and is curently an aircrewman, he was 29 (to the best of my knowledge). Also- on my POV to Yeoviltan, our host officer was an ex warfare officer who became an observer (unsure on age). Basically- in all my research, I've heard of plenty people transferring to observer but none to pilot!
  4. Well, as I said, there's a reason for that. Aircrewmen do some of an Observers' job (and do some stuff an Observer doesn't do, and vice versa), thus promoting them to Observer is a less risky proposition.

    The Warfare Officer who went pilot would have been under 26 on selection for Aircrew training.

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