Did you know Lt Cdr David Barry Knowles, 1967?

Top Cat

Newbie
Hey, chaps/chapesses
I'm after some help from the older amongst you, please.
Lt Cdr David Barry Knowles, known as Barry, was lost in an air accident in 1967 when his Sea Vixen crashed near Belfast. I don't particularly need details of the accident but his daughter is a friend of mine and a recent Facebook post touched me.
Barry died not long after she was born, and she has no memory of what he was like as a man or as a dad.
So that's what I'm after - any memories from those who served with him. Barry the bloke; Barry the mate, the oppo; Barry the pilot. Any photos also much appreciated. If I get enough gen I'll make a memory book for her.
Many thanks!

TC
 
D

Deleted 108567

Guest
This accident was in the 1960's .Sadly , back then, not much fuss was made of the likes of David Knowles coming to grief in badly maintained aircraft. The Royal Navy was at a low ebb ,.
Compared to today, it was an uphill task to order the ship's company to wear their medals at such events as Sunday Divisions. They all hated it.
These days, wearing medals with uniform, anytime ,anywhere seems commonplace.
It's a different world.
 

Dusty70

War Hero
This accident was in the 1960's .Sadly , back then, not much fuss was made of the likes of David Knowles coming to grief in badly maintained aircraft. The Royal Navy was at a low ebb ,.
Compared to today, it was an uphill task to order the ship's company to wear their medals at such events as Sunday Divisions. They all hated it.
These days, wearing medals with uniform, anytime ,anywhere seems commonplace.
It's a different world.
'Poorly maintained aircraft' - the proof for that statement

'hated wearing medals at Sunday Divisions' ? I think it was more likely the Divisions themselves if you were knackered after 6 days work and deserved either a lie in or leave...........................

where do you get this crap from ?.............................................
 

slim

War Hero
This accident was in the 1960's .Sadly , back then, not much fuss was made of the likes of David Knowles coming to grief in badly maintained aircraft. The Royal Navy was at a low ebb ,.
Compared to today, it was an uphill task to order the ship's company to wear their medals at such events as Sunday Divisions. They all hated it.
These days, wearing medals with uniform, anytime ,anywhere seems commonplace.
It's a different world.
Who the **** are you to blame "badly maintained aircraft"
Aviation in the 60s relied on the aircraft being correctly maintained.
Life flying from a carrier was far riskier in the 60s and many aircrew died in flying accidents.
If any Sea Vixen maintainers are still around may I invite them to have a fkn word in yer shell like, ********!
 
D

Deleted 108567

Guest
Who the **** are you to blame "badly maintained aircraft"
Aviation in the 60s relied on the aircraft being correctly maintained.
Life flying from a carrier was far riskier in the 60s and many aircrew died in flying accidents.
If any Sea Vixen maintainers are still around may I invite them to have a fkn word in yer shell like, ********!
Something was wrong in the 50' and 60's aircraft accident-wise.
Given that maintenance was first class it must have been the aircraft or aircrew who were responsible for the large number of post WW2 RN accidents,
I seem to remember when the name of the naval air mechanic was printed alongside the pilots on aircraft presumably attempting to quell the increasing numbers of losses or to name those responsible.
 

slim

War Hero
Something was wrong in the 50' and 60's aircraft accident-wise.
Given that maintenance was first class it must have been the aircraft or aircrew who were responsible for the large number of post WW2 RN accidents,
I seem to remember when the name of the naval air mechanic was printed alongside the pilots on aircraft presumably attempting to quell the increasing numbers of losses or to name those responsible.
Rumtub
You are a gobshite who knows sweet FA about naval aviation in the 60s.
There were three names of Plane captains written on the aircraft underneath the aircrews names.
Three because at sea squadrons worked three watches,
Plane captains were very proud of their aircraft and anyone stating that a cab was poorly maintained would have been presented with a fat lip.
In the 60s flying from a carrier was an extremely dangerous occupation, the MK1 Buccaneer had Gyron Junior engines which were basically not powerful enough for the job in hand. Hardly the maintainers fault.
The flight deck of a carrier was the most dangerous place in the world, especially if you did not know what you were doing.
Like motor racing flying from carriers is now far safer due entirely to lessons learned in the last 60 years!
Now get back in yer box where you belong!
 
D

Deleted 108567

Guest
Rumtub
You are a gobshite who knows sweet FA about naval aviation in the 60s.
There were three names of Plane captains written on the aircraft underneath the aircrews names.
Three because at sea squadrons worked three watches,
Plane captains were very proud of their aircraft and anyone stating that a cab was poorly maintained would have been presented with a fat lip.
In the 60s flying from a carrier was an extremely dangerous occupation, the MK1 Buccaneer had Gyron Junior engines which were basically not powerful enough for the job in hand. Hardly the maintainers fault.
The flight deck of a carrier was the most dangerous place in the world, especially if you did not know what you were doing.
Like motor racing flying from carriers is now far safer due entirely to lessons learned in the last 60 years!
Now get back in yer box where you belong!
Perhaps I know a little more of it that I will acquaint you of.
That the aircraft you were servicing were singularly useless- with that i will agree.
But of the maintainers?
From the little I saw ,they appeared to be equipped with screw drivers with a broad blades for opening aircraft inspection panels. To do what? They called their screw drivers GS 's
Call the CAA?
 

slim

War Hero
Perhaps I know a little more of it that I will acquaint you of.
That the aircraft you were servicing were singularly useless- with that i will agree.
But of the maintainers?
From the little I saw ,they appeared to be equipped with screw drivers with a broad blades for opening aircraft inspection panels. To do what? They called their screw drivers GS 's
Call the CAA?
FFS you ignorant imbecile.
Panels that were frequently opened were normally secured by Dzus fasteners.
These required a half turn to either open or close.
The GS (general Service) screwdriver had a broad tip which fitted the head of a Dzus fastener nicely.
F.Y.I.
Every aircraft had it's own toolbox and every tool was identified by coloured tape and etching as belonging to that tool box. Maintainers had a line Pouch and tools were also marked in a similar fashion.
A lost tool grounded an aircraft until that tool had been found.
If a tool could not be found then the aircraft did not fly until an ALL trades tool search had been carried out to try and find the tool or at least ensure that it was not inside the cab.
I left aviation in 1985 and vowed never to work on another aircraft.
Standards were such that I relished the thought of working on naval weapons which allowed far more leeway.
 

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