Did anyone see The Trap... (Sun 18.3.07) BBC2 at 2100?

Did anyone see The Trap: What Happened To Our Dreams of Freedom on Sunday evening at 2100 on BBC2? It was about how Blair took forward John Major's idea of the supremacy of the market into areas previously thought unsuitable and how it has perversely blocked the ability of people to improve their lives. Essentially the programme looked at how game theory, first used in defence behavour modelling had come to dominate economic, social and even scientific thinking from the 1970s to today and how this was now beginning to unravel as facts (what many of us might call common sense) showed that humans do not behave as genetically programmed automatons.

At the end of the programme, they looked at the latest behavoural research by economists to test their game theory model of human behaviour maximising effort for self gain (what economists call rational behaviour) and the resulting data showed that only two groups of people actually think and behave rationally......... economists and... wait for it....

...psychopaths! :shock: :grin: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Steve you know I am very fond of you, but sometimes I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about!

I did however watch 2 episodes of Grey's Anatomy on Sunday whilst eating an illicit Easter Egg.
Illicitly devouring nutty... nutty and more nutty! You're almost as bad as Ken!

Rosie, here's what the BBC press release had to say about the first programme in the series (the one last night was the second in the series).

BBC Press Release said:
Individual freedom is the dream of our age. It's what our leaders promise to give us, it defines how we think of ourselves and, repeatedly, we have gone to war to impose freedom around the world. But if you step back and look at what freedom actually means for us today, it's a strange and limited kind of freedom.

Politicians promised to liberate us from the old dead hand of bureaucracy, but they have created an evermore controlling system of social management, driven by targets and numbers. Governments committed to freedom of choice have presided over a rise in inequality and a dramatic collapse in social mobility. And abroad, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the attempt to enforce freedom has led to bloody mayhem and the rise of an authoritarian anti-democratic Islamism. This, in turn, has helped inspire terrorist attacks in Britain. In response, the Government has dismantled long-standing laws designed to protect our freedom.

The Trap is a series of three films by Bafta-winning producer Adam Curtis that explains the origins of our contemporary, narrow idea of freedom.

It shows how a simplistic model of human beings as self-seeking, almost robotic, creatures led to today's idea of freedom. This model was derived from ideas and techniques developed by nuclear strategists during the Cold War to control the behaviour of the Soviet enemy.

Mathematicians such as John Nash developed paranoid game theories whose equations required people to be seen as selfish and isolated creatures, constantly monitoring each other suspiciously – always intent on their own advantage.

This model was then developed by genetic biologists, anthropologists, radical psychiatrists and free market economists, and has come to dominate both political thinking since the Seventies and the way people think about themselves as human beings.

However, within this simplistic idea lay the seeds of new forms of control. And what people have forgotten is that there are other ideas of freedom. We are, says Curtis, in a trap of our own making that controls us, deprives us of meaning and causes death and chaos abroad.
More here...
Always_a_Civvy said:
It shows how a simplistic model of human beings as self-seeking, almost robotic, creatures led to today's idea of freedom.

That probably explains some of the US mentality and their seemingly overwhelming urge to stick the epithet 'Freedom' onto everything from burgers to SUVs. Can you recall a Bush speech that hasn't involved the use of the word at least once?

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