Did a sub sink this trawler ?

#5
oooo ooooo this is a good game 'random speculation'


Lets see, my contribution...


I think, right, that the missing freighter, the Maltese Flagged, Russian crewed one carrying 'timber' was sunk by a SSN because MI6 had information that it was carrying nuclear weapons, and SF couldn't land on it and take it over! I'm not sure which country to blame though. Maybe the French, seeing as it has an Algeria connection...
 
#6
notafourknotfudgepacker said:
This saga has been going on for years - it's complete bollocks that a UK SSN was involved. However a load of "legal experts" and "rent a nuclear expert.co.uk" will make loads of money out of it.
Considering every time this happens the finger is pointed at the submarine fleet I would have thought this could degenerate into a simple "cut and paste" media exercise. No doubt the resident South West "Naval Expert" M**e C******ly will give everyone the benefit of his knowledge :roll:

Glad no porpoises were killed or the surface fleet would get blamed for that
 
#9
Bergen said:
ANTARES

PESCADO
OK so it has happened before but it is certainly not the only reason fishing boatys sink, in fact it is one of the least common causes of fishing boats sinking, but the military haters and compensation lawyers enjoy making up stories every time a fishing boat sinks.

Now which one are you, a miltary hater or a compensation lawyer?
 
#10
It happens...

Atlantic 12/01/82: The Royal Navy nuclear-powered attack
submarine HMS Spartan caught in the nets of the English
trawler Algrie off Land's End, Cornwall, U.K., in the Celtic
Sea. As the trawler is dragged forward the fishermen radio to
shore, and several minutes later the submarine surfaces with the
nets and tackle laying across the vessel. The nets, costing
7-8,000 pounds sterling, are cut free, and the submarine
continues on its patrol.

Interesting information at this site... http://lists.peacelink.it/armamenti/msg00252.html

Of course RN never gets compensated when it
s the other way round... :D



Atlantic 06/10/85: The Royal Navy nuclear-powered ballistic
missile submarine HMS Resolution is struck by the U.S. yacht
Proud Mary off Cape Canaveral, Florida, in the early morning.
The submarine suffers minor damage, but the yacht has to be
towed back to port.The Resolution on its way to test-fire one of
her Polaris missiles on the U.S. Navy's Atlantic Test Range
after undergoing amajor refit in Rosyth naval shipyard,
Scotland.
 
#11
99% of the time the reason a trawler goes over is they snag their nets and the skipper won't cut them free… bit of a chop and you start pulling hard on a snagged net to try and free it and gravity meets mr bouyancy with predictable results.
 
#14
I`ve seen it happen ..off Bournemouth …a small fishing boat with 1 owner crew suddenly started going fast astern …it was immediately swamped and the skipper jumped clear ..this was in the 80s when I kept a boat at Poole…I don`t know what came of the incident but I have always thought it must have been a submarine…

Of course I don`t believe for a moment it was one of ours

……..
 
#15
It seems that all their 'experts' have said is that the damage seems to have been caused by a sub. Why does it particularly have to be British?
 
#16
Look….
A sub is an out of town post office …
It describes an inferior item…or something subline..
Or a standin for your duty..
It is wot you bum off your oppo when you are short of cash….


But it is never EVER used in the Andrew to describe a feckin BOAT….

Not in front of submariners anyway…


…
 
#17
WreckerL said:
As this really winds me up and Bergan hasn't done his research and resorted to tabloid style false accusations I thought I'd stick this in ref. the Pescado

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/pescado-disaster-blamed-on-owner-1199850.html

If you bother to read it Bergan, it had nothing to do with the RN but a greedy owner sending an unseaworthy boat out and cutting every available corner

rant over
Oh dear another expert.

I put both names up to illustrate that one was a real submarine incident and one wasn't.

FYI I led the salvage of both vessels. Lifted the Pescado from just off the Manacles with the Seaway Harrier with the D&C police forensic team onboard and ended up months later in Bristol Crown Court giving expert witness testimony against both the owner and the manager of the Pescado for six charges of manslaughter.

RM
 

witsend

MIA
Book Reviewer
#18
Bergen said:
Oh dear another expert.

I put both names up to illustrate that one was a real submarine incident and one wasn't.

FYI I led the salvage of both vessels. Lifted the Pescado from just off the Manacles with the Seaway Harrier with the D&C police forensic team onboard and ended up months later in Bristol Crown Court giving expert witness testimony against both the owner and the manager of the Pescado for six charges of manslaughter.

RM
:roll: Why not say that in the first place.
 
#19
witsend said:
Bergen said:
Oh dear another expert.

I put both names up to illustrate that one was a real submarine incident and one wasn't.

FYI I led the salvage of both vessels. Lifted the Pescado from just off the Manacles with the Seaway Harrier with the D&C police forensic team onboard and ended up months later in Bristol Crown Court giving expert witness testimony against both the owner and the manager of the Pescado for six charges of manslaughter.

RM
:roll: Why not say that in the first place.
No, not an expert or claiming to be in my post, just an experienced submariner so get off your high horse. Just posting 2 names of sunken trawlers and nothing else implies (to me) that you were insinuating they were both the result of submarine accidents. I hope your testimony was less ambiguous!!
 

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