Dennis Hutchings

SONAR-BENDER

War Hero
I make no apologies for posting this:


This is Johnny Mercer’s piece for The Telegraph following the recent death of Dennis Hutchings.
---------------
My friend Dennis Hutchings died because our leaders are too cowardly to end witch-hunt trials
With no new evidence presented, the decision by Northern Ireland’s judicial system to drag a veteran through the courts was grotesque farce

In the end, he died alone, without any family, struggling to breathe and miles from home. He was determined to face down his accusers, but the farce that is the judicial system in Northern Ireland got their man in the end.
The trial killed him. The prosecution spent most of their time reading into the record “hearsay” historical evidence - there was no new evidence presented. It reminded me of the kangaroo courts we used to have in the barracks as young soldiers. Except this was no joke.

While many are united in the condemnation of these trials, they have to be witnessed in person for their full abhorrent nature to be truly appreciated. An old man - barely able to hear, dying in front of us, alone save for his dogged legal team led by Philip Barden - totally abandoned by his political masters that sent him to prevent civil war in Northern Ireland so many decades ago.

Things happened in Northern Ireland that should never have happened. People died who should never have died - the vast majority, of course, by republican and loyalist terrorists. But to think that these witch hunts are a way of correcting that is completely absurd.

Justice? We all want justice. But no one is quite brave enough to frame what justice might actually look like to the families some 50 years later. The investigations were appallingly bad; evidence was often collected in a way that is not lawful today. We let down many victims and security force personnel who died in the conflict. But the real question is what to do with the world as we find it, not as we would wish it to be.
My contempt for those who make a living off the back of the grievance industry in Northern Ireland knows no bounds.

Politicians have for years promised to end this grotesque spectacle. They’ve promised a lot - I’ll give them that. They know it’s not fair, they know it helps no one. They do care; the British public loathes how we treat our veterans in this country, and for secretaries of state and special advisers guided only by the latest opinion poll without any original ideas of their own, this makes them care.

But the harsh truth I’ve painfully realised of late is that they simply don’t care enough to actually do anything about it. Not once has the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland ever asked me what to do to sort this out; the Prime Minister can’t even be bothered to reply to my letters or make time to see me or others to discuss it.
Some complain that I call them cowards for not standing up for people like Dennis. But that is exactly what they have displayed - a political cowardice that cowers in the face of a bullying narrative that we should be ashamed of our veterans in this country. I simply will not accept it.

Rest easy, Dennis. I miss you, my friend. I’m proud of you.
 

SONAR-BENDER

War Hero
Dennis family have released the following information. The funeral service for Dennis will be held at St Andrews Church in Plymouth at 13.00hrs on Thursday 11 November 2021. The family will be honoured by any veterans and supporters who would like to attend. The service is open to all. More details will follow at a later date.
Minster Church of St. Andrew · Royal Parade, Plymouth PL1 2AD, United Kingdom

GOOGLE.COM
Minster Church of St. Andrew · Royal Parade, Plymouth PL1 2AD, United Kingdom
★★★★★ · Anglican church
 

legend

Midshipman
Well done SONAR-BENDER for highlighting this despicable injustice of Dennis Hutchings , like myself a former British soldier doing his job from a young age, a thankless job at times but unfortunately a job that had to be carried out by someone. Many of us regardless of which section of the Armed Forces we decided to join or for what reason ( in my case it was purely patriotic) , did so totally oblivious of the dangers involved and we just got on with the tasks in hand .
I have supported this particular case as well as other similar cases and kindly ask any serving or former serving members of HM Armed Forces or indeed anyone who cares about the future of our governmental justice system and also the future stability of our national culture and integrity to do the same .
RIP Dennis in your final RV
thanks
 

calam

Midshipman
I make no apologies for posting this:


This is Johnny Mercer’s piece for The Telegraph following the recent death of Dennis Hutchings.
---------------
My friend Dennis Hutchings died because our leaders are too cowardly to end witch-hunt trials
With no new evidence presented, the decision by Northern Ireland’s judicial system to drag a veteran through the courts was grotesque farce

In the end, he died alone, without any family, struggling to breathe and miles from home. He was determined to face down his accusers, but the farce that is the judicial system in Northern Ireland got their man in the end.
The trial killed him. The prosecution spent most of their time reading into the record “hearsay” historical evidence - there was no new evidence presented. It reminded me of the kangaroo courts we used to have in the barracks as young soldiers. Except this was no joke.

While many are united in the condemnation of these trials, they have to be witnessed in person for their full abhorrent nature to be truly appreciated. An old man - barely able to hear, dying in front of us, alone save for his dogged legal team led by Philip Barden - totally abandoned by his political masters that sent him to prevent civil war in Northern Ireland so many decades ago.

Things happened in Northern Ireland that should never have happened. People died who should never have died - the vast majority, of course, by republican and loyalist terrorists. But to think that these witch hunts are a way of correcting that is completely absurd.

Justice? We all want justice. But no one is quite brave enough to frame what justice might actually look like to the families some 50 years later. The investigations were appallingly bad; evidence was often collected in a way that is not lawful today. We let down many victims and security force personnel who died in the conflict. But the real question is what to do with the world as we find it, not as we would wish it to be.
My contempt for those who make a living off the back of the grievance industry in Northern Ireland knows no bounds.

Politicians have for years promised to end this grotesque spectacle. They’ve promised a lot - I’ll give them that. They know it’s not fair, they know it helps no one. They do care; the British public loathes how we treat our veterans in this country, and for secretaries of state and special advisers guided only by the latest opinion poll without any original ideas of their own, this makes them care.

But the harsh truth I’ve painfully realised of late is that they simply don’t care enough to actually do anything about it. Not once has the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland ever asked me what to do to sort this out; the Prime Minister can’t even be bothered to reply to my letters or make time to see me or others to discuss it.
Some complain that I call them cowards for not standing up for people like Dennis. But that is exactly what they have displayed - a political cowardice that cowers in the face of a bullying narrative that we should be ashamed of our veterans in this country. I simply will not accept it.

Rest easy, Dennis. I miss you, my friend. I’m proud of you.
This indeed a sorry state of affairs. But so far as the law is concerned , a British soldier shot an unarmed disabled man in the back during Internal security on British soil during peace time.
That Dennis was not responsible and was persecuted is manifestly unjust.
But someone fired the shot. If that soldier was given a direct order to do that then that must be investigated, but if he did it of his own volition then that is another matter.
 

Alfacharlie

War Hero
This indeed a sorry state of affairs. But so far as the law is concerned , a British soldier shot an unarmed disabled man in the back during Internal security on British soil during peace time.
That Dennis was not responsible and was persecuted is manifestly unjust.
But someone fired the shot. If that soldier was given a direct order to do that then that must be investigated, but if he did it of his own volition then that is another matter.
Cock
 

calam

Midshipman
In the 1920's Field Marshal Lord Ironside stated " For a soldier there is no more distasteful duty than that of aiding the civil power." Throughout the 20's and 30's The General Staff displayed a reluctance to commit the army to Internal Security duties.
Post WW2 that changed in Palestine when a large number of National Service soldiers in 1947/48 found themselves doing just that.The rules of engagement for Internal Security/ Riot Control where the Military is called in to aid the Civil Powers seem to have been drawn up then.
Lord Ironside would have been further appalled as I recall two or was it three British Sergeants being strung up by the rioters. I think an officer who cut them down was himself badly injured as the bodies had been booby- trapped.
The army in Northern Ireland were committed to the same "distasteful duty" that so appalled the General Staff post WW1.

It was asking too much of them.
 

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