Decompression

#2
On a similar note , the french guy Capt Jaques Custard did a dive in in lake Titicaca in south America in the 60`s.

Because of the altitude it buggered up the standard decopression stop times and depths.

Taint natural I say, if man were ment to go under water .................. :dwarf:
 
#3
swiss_navy said:
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Here are a few articles which may be of interest to Divers, and other members on the Forum, who have a specialist knowledge on this subject.

It is the account of a U-2 pilot on a high altitude reconnaissance flight over Afghanistan, who suffered a fault with his pressure suit and subsequent decompression.[/align]







http://www.usnews.com/articles/news/national/2007/09/20/a-u-2-pilots-dangerous-landing.html


Part1: http://www.chicoer.com/ci_4605854


Part2: http://www.chicoer.com/ci_4609423


Part3: http://www.chicoer.com/ci_4614592


http://jeremy.zawodny.com/blog/archives/006511.html

Decompression?? Would have thought that what he needed was recompression. But what the fcuk do I know.. Bergen walks away muttering about Isobaric Gas Counter-Diffusion and the advantages of using H / He / O2 tri-mixes in ultra-deep diving, tissue pulls, perfusion, diffusion and Buster Crabbe...

Decompression; the orderly elimination of inert gasses from body tissues :thumright:

Edited to add - The RAF carried out a successful intercept of a U2 at 88,000 ft using an English Electric Lightning F3. It shook the Seppos up just a little :thumright:

RM
 
#5
Having done the decompression chamber at Cranwell I can still remember the effects even thought it was decades ago. At a cabin altitude of 23000 ft we went off O2 and tried to do simple maths, total failure, even better was watching those suffering from hypoxia trying to do something about it, whilst we (the other half of the course) were still on O2. The result resemblies alcoholic inoxication. More dramatic was the explosive decompresion, in a simulated cabin failure you are taken from 23000 ft to about 40000 + in a second or so, loud noises and instant fog. The "best" bit however was on the way down, in order to conserve O2 we were ordered mask off at 10000ft. At this point we were aquainted with the effects of pressure difference on the human body in very unfortunate manner. All that gas in the intestines had been escaping all the time and the chambers atmosphere was unbelievable. :pukel:
 
#6
swiss_navy said:
Topstop said:
On a similar note , the french guy Capt Jaques Custard did a dive in in lake Titicaca in south America in the 60`s.

Because of the altitude it buggered up the standard decopression stop times and depths.

Taint natural I say, if man were ment to go under water .................. :dwarf:
There is some dispute over the true Nationality of Capt Jaques Custard - some claim that he was in fact Belgian - however, stand by to be corrected on that one.

On the 'altitude' theme, there is a proven technique to recover pilots who suffer from the effect of hypoxia - wind the altimeter down to zero - then step out.


Two USAF pilots did almost exactly that, according to the accident investigation, whilst suffering from hypoxia they decided to go for a walk, too bad there was aroung 20000ft of air underneath them and some very solid ground under that.

There are however some mistakes you only make once.
 
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