Decisions

#1
I know ultimately it is my decision but I have been given conflicting advice and I would like to hear some realistic opinions . I have tried to go down the WO route however, having had my interview I have been advised that I am too young at the moment. As a result I have been given two options go to Uni and come back in three years or go in as rating and work my way up inside the Navy. Initially, I have agreed to go in as a rating however, in retrospect and in light of doing further research on both this forum and through talking to ex members of the Navy they have suggested that it would be very difficult of virtually impossible to achieve officer through the rating route.

As previously mentioned I do not want someone to make my decision for me but I would appreciate a realistic picture of my chances.

Thanks
 
#2
To proceed to officer from the lower decks the onus is very much on the individual. It's not guaranteed of course otherwise everyone would be doing it. At present in the organisation for which I work, a WO has been selected for BRNC, two other officers came from the ranks, and a Commander has just left who also joined up as a JR. There are at least three other officers that I know of in this building who came through the ranks. Yes it's difficult, but I think it's incorrect to say that it is virtually impossible. The problem is that there are no guarantees. The final decision as you say is yours, the final decision of whether or not you can be officer is made by the interview board.
 
#3
I know ultimately it is my decision but I have been given conflicting advice and I would like to hear some realistic opinions . I have tried to go down the WO route however, having had my interview I have been advised that I am too young at the moment. As a result I have been given two options go to Uni and come back in three years or go in as rating and work my way up inside the Navy. Initially, I have agreed to go in as a rating however, in retrospect and in light of doing further research on both this forum and through talking to ex members of the Navy they have suggested that it would be very difficult of virtually impossible to achieve officer through the rating route.

As previously mentioned I do not want someone to make my decision for me but I would appreciate a realistic picture of my chances.

Thanks
I echo what Polto said. However, if you want to join up as an officer, join up as an officer.
 
#5
If you don't mind me asking, how old are you?

You only have to be 17 to apply to join as a Warfare Officer.

Going through the ranks is by no means guaranteed and it shouldn't be your sole motivation for joining as a rating. The jobs officers and ratings do is fairly different, especially in the Warfare departments.

If you want to be an Officer, don't take someone else's opinion. Get yourself to AIB and prove yourself.

Likewise, if you want to be a Rating, do it.
 
#7
I have been going through the Warfare officer route but did not reach the AIB as I was told I was too young, hope that clears up the confusion. Just turned 18.
 
#8
There are multiple 18-year old commissioned officers going through Warfare training as we speak.

You are not too young, that is patently false.

I suggest you return to the ACLO and have a proper, formal conversation about going through the AIB process - assuming you qualify medically and educationally.
 

Sumo

War Hero
#9
@Ninja_Stoker any helpful advice.
I am over 20 years a civy, but my shout is, if you want to be an officer then join as one if that is possible, if not possible for what ever reason then look at joining as a rating.
going through the ranks is possible but not guaranteed, there are many permutations that can get in your way.

Your focus (runs ashore, partners etc.)
your bosses, and their write-ups (do they like you, do they think your officer material?)
your drafts ( some places can put a lot of extra work onto officer candidates)
are but a few

As you say your choice in the end, do your research and good luck.
 
#10
Alfie - go in as an orifice! As said, it is very possible to go SD/GL from a rating, but lots of hoops to jump through. Even a (alleged ;)) personality clash with a superior can wreck an important (for you) write up.

If you have doubts about YOUR current ability join the Scouts or similar as an adult instructor, or even your local RNR unit.There you'll gain some life experiences and some leadership stuff, which will both look good and also help at AIB.

Don't worry about your actual role or work once in the RN - your Chiefs do all that for you...........
 

Dusty70

Lantern Swinger
#13
Going through the ranks is by no means guaranteed and it shouldn't be your sole motivation for joining as a rating. The jobs officers and ratings do is VASTLY different, especially in the Warfare departments.

Get your painting and decorating skills up to date
 
#14
Thanks again everyone much appreciated, I thought I might have had enough experience in my short life as I am CI at sea cadets and have worked part time at my local chippy so know how to mop a floor and peel potatoes. You have given me a lot to think about. Thanks again
 
#15
Thanks again everyone much appreciated, I thought I might have had enough experience in my short life as I am CI at sea cadets and have worked part time at my local chippy so know how to mop a floor and peel potatoes. You have given me a lot to think about. Thanks again
Part of the recruitment process, is do you have the skills and aptitude to be an officer, speak to your recruiter again, it may be you are not to young by age but by experience?
 
#16
If I can just reiterate what's been said here - if you want to be an Officer then join as an Officer. I say this as a serving Officer who was promoted from the ranks. There are lots of others who have followed the same route and it's a well trodden path, but it's certainly not guaranteed. Also, if you were to join as a Rating and were successful in achieving a commission in service then depending on the time it took you could find yourself at a disadvantage with regards to your ability to reach higher rank. Plus in the meantime you may find yourself doing a job you don't enjoy, which brings me to my second point.

There is a world of difference between the role of an Officer, regardless of specialisation, and that of a Rating. I really enjoy my job but I don't think it would have suited me at 18 when I joined, and indeed it was only when I found I was no longer enjoying my job as a Senior Rate maintainer that I considered it. Look very carefully at what you want to do. There is no shame in joining and serving an entire career as a Rating, it in no way implies an inferiority in comparison to an Officer they are just different jobs, with different skills and responsibilities. It may be that after some research you find a non-commissioned role that suits you, in which case go for it, it doesn't stop you applying for a commission later. But equally you may find nothing that appeals, and I'd say taking a job you aren't going to enjoy because it 'could' lead to a commission would be a mistake. If you are sure the Officer route is the one you want to take, then take it.
 

Dusty70

Lantern Swinger
#17
I agree with pompeyexpat - I was a PO and I was in my element - wouldn't have dreamt of doing anything else - and as a senior rate you make the on the spot operational decisions in the majority of times, the officers are accountable for them, so you (nearly) always make sure you have a trusting and respectful partnership with your officer(s)

when my time came to leave I did a management degree with my termination grant ? - while most of the others did HGV or brick laying as a backup !

I also moved myself away from naval areas as I would be competing with others of similar skills

I ended up as a very senior manager in the Department of Health and the NHS on a salary greater than that of an RN Captain and there were many ex officers accountable to me
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#19
The only thing to add, from my perspective of s simply that academic eligibility and suitability for role should not be confused. A degree does not an Officer make. Life experience, maturity, people skills & leadership potential are critical factors.

The ACLOs job is to manage expectations and advise career options, the choice is that of the individual.

You could indeed go to uni, rack up £50k + debt, gain a non-vocational degree, three years independent life experience and arrive better prepared for AIB.

Equally you could join as a rating now, earn £60k + income, gain three years independent life experience, travel & vocational work experience, together with leadership experience and then go for AIB without a degree. About 40% of Commissions in several branches are now via this route.

Horses for courses and due to the fact we're significantly overborne with Warfare Officers (check out how many ships there aren't), there's a long wait to join and we can afford to be much more selective.

Good luck to you.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top