CPOs going from square rig to fore-and-aft rig

#1
Chiefs wore 'square rig' of jumper and bell-bottoms from the introduction of the new rate in the early 1850s to 1879, when they were put in 'fore-and-aft' rig of peaked cap, 'long jacket' and straight trousers.

So my question is; what was that about? Why not just leave them in square rig?
 
#2
Chiefs wore 'square rig' of jumper and bell-bottoms from the introduction of the new rate in the early 1850s to 1879, when they were put in 'fore-and-aft' rig of peaked cap, 'long jacket' and straight trousers.

So my question is; what was that about? Why not just leave them in square rig?
It's only when Shropshire made wool from poor Welsh Sheep farmers became available at a price that the Admiralty thought appropriate that Slops (Shopshire)
cloth was made available to fulfil the Make Do and Mend periods that Captains considered sufficient for the crew to make their own uniforms.
That's how it started and why those uniform and other store-rooms are called Slops to this day.
 
#4
Chiefs wore 'square rig' of jumper and bell-bottoms from the introduction of the new rate in the early 1850s to 1879, when they were put in 'fore-and-aft' rig of peaked cap, 'long jacket' and straight trousers.

So my question is; what was that about? Why not just leave them in square rig?
Because their wives needed to make sure that they weren't mistaken for a junior rates's wife.
 
#6
Tempted to answer without a reference but I believe suchlike was the result of an endeavour to recognise the differential 'twixt those of experience and seniority and those lesser.

Since those times the privileges and perquisites grudgingly afforded to Chuffs & Puffs were slow in coming and, once achieved, vigorously guarded.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top