colour problem

Discussion in 'The Corps' started by matt_b, May 3, 2008.

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  1. i believe to join the royal marines you need a cp3 this is what i have been told. If i can remember correctly i have a cp4 because of a red and green colour deficiancy. I have researched and found something called a lantern test that pilots use if they have the same problem to pass the colour test. Does anyone know if this is true and if i can use it to join the royal marines ? any help will be gratefull. thanks
     
  2. Bugger, been had again, thought this was about predjudice. :w00t:
     
  3. mate go and ask ur AFCO (armed forces careers office) they will know the official answer as a pose to us spinning second hand scran que dits to you
     
  4. I dont mind the chinks and the Indians but i don't much like Pakistanis either mate.
     
  5. mattb:

    I hope by your inquiry that you are not proposing to try and cheat your way into passing the colour tests?

    I've seen many recruits over the years sadly turned away because of a physical limitation. Of course they are upset, and of course it is disheartening to them to be refused entry to a vocation of their first choice. One feels for them but one also knows that the standards for the medical side of the entrance is necessary and there for a reason.

    We have on many of the sites that have armed forces recruiting questions, seen suggestions that if a medical issue has arisen that it might be a good idea to withhold that info, or attempt to cheat/hide a way through it.

    The consequences of a such an action should a potential recruits try and hide a limitation is larger in scope than just the individual applying being found out. That is the part that I had the most difficulty in dealing with once that limitation had been discovered. In some cases it was restricted to the individual and didn't cost any lives or assets. I had no problem prosecuting the individual and arranging their quick return to civvy street.

    In cases where the limitation caused a loss of life or asset, I left the guilt of the action of the individual to weigh on their conscience for putting others at risk because of a selfish act to hide a physical limitation. In the end, they still lost their job, found they were released and given a DD designation on their papers. Hardly worth it in the end as they still found themselves on the out.

    I want you to read this attached legal decision that was heard here in Canada. It explains quite nicely why certain physical limitations are supported by legislation to be barred from gaining certain employment. It also explains the lantern test you have inquired about.

    http://www.chrt-tcdp.gc.ca/search/view_html.asp?doid=42&lg=_e&isruling=0

    Perhaps after reading it, you will accept that the RM has a certain level of physical ability and it is there for a reason. Perhaps acknowledging that your colour blindness will barr you from entry, you might consider other types of service to your country that your colour blindness will have no bearing upon.

    We all have and will face some level of disappointment in our lives over being told we aren't suitable. The mark of strong person is to rise above that and focus on other choices instead of trying to cheat our way into what we think is our only goal. I hope you do the same.
     
  6. Same here, where's the fun these days.
     
  7. Well it is in a far fetched kind of way. I suspect that someone, at some point will cry foul that rejecting colour blindness in the RM is prejudiced.
     
  8. Matt,

    If you have difficulty distinguishing between red and green, might I suggest you join the Parachute Regiment, as the colour of their berets are just about the only difference between the two.
     
  9. haha i wondered when THAT joke was gonna arise its head!
     

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