Ceremonial Day coats for those below flag rank?

#1
Hello all

The current (June 2015) RN uniform regulations only allow Ceremonial Day Dress for those of Flag Rank; however, both the present Prince of Wales (whilst a Commander from at least 1979 and as a Captain) and the Duke of York (whilst a Commander) both wore this uniform on numerous occasions despite being below flag rank at the time.

The current dress regulations mention nothing about any commissioned officer, royal or non-royal, below flag rank being entitled to wear ceremonial day dress. Anyone know if any of the previous regulations did?
 
#2
More to the point; why was Ceremonial Day Dress, the 1959 'modernised' version of full dress which had been suspended but not abolished at the outbreak of war in 1939, restricted only to flag officers anyway; when full dress was allowed for sublieutenants and above (although its use was suspended 1916-1918 and it was restricted to levees and made compulsory only for those of the rank of commander and above afterwards)?
 
G

guestm

Guest
#3
Hello all

The current (June 2015) RN uniform regulations only allow Ceremonial Day Dress for those of Flag Rank; however, both the present Prince of Wales (whilst a Commander from at least 1979 and as a Captain) and the Duke of York (whilst a Commander) both wore this uniform on numerous occasions despite being below flag rank at the time.

The current dress regulations mention nothing about any commissioned officer, royal or non-royal, below flag rank being entitled to wear ceremonial day dress. Anyone know if any of the previous regulations did?
You should tell them they're out of the rig of the day. Let us know how you get on.
 

epsom salt

Lantern Swinger
#5
Hello all

The current (June 2015) RN uniform regulations only allow Ceremonial Day Dress for those of Flag Rank; however, both the present Prince of Wales (whilst a Commander from at least 1979 and as a Captain) and the Duke of York (whilst a Commander) both wore this uniform on numerous occasions despite being below flag rank at the time.

The current dress regulations mention nothing about any commissioned officer, royal or non-royal, below flag rank being entitled to wear ceremonial day dress. Anyone know if any of the previous regulations did?
1948 on Standard of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh A banner of the Coat of Arms of the Duke of Edinburgh, 1st quarter representing Denmark, 2nd quarter Greece, 3rd quarter the Mountbatten family, 4th quarter Edinburgh
2000 on Standard of HRH The Duke of Cambridge Banner of the Prince's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a three-point label, the centre label bearing an Escallop in reference to the arms of Diana, Princess of Wales
2002 on Standard of HRH Prince Henry of Wales (Prince Harry) Banner of the Prince's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label, the first, centre and fifth labels bearing an Escallop in reference to the arms of Diana, Princess of Wales
1978 on Standard of HRH The Duke of York Banner of the Duke's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a three-point label, the centre label bearing a blue anchor
2006 on Standard of HRH Princess Beatrice of York Banner of the Princess's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label with three bees in alternating points
2008 on Standard of HRH Princess Eugenie of York Banner of the Princess's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label with three thistle heads in alternating points
Standard of HRH The Earl of Wessex Banner of the Earl's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a three-point label, the centre label bearing a Tudor Rose
Standard of HRH The Princess Royal Banner of the Princess's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a three-point label, the first and third labels bearing a red cross, the centre label bearing a red heart.
1962 on Standard of HRH The Duke of Gloucester Banner of the Duke's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label, the first, third and fifth labels bearing a red cross, the second and fourth labels bearing a red lion.
Standard of HRH The Duke of Kent Banner of the Duke's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label, the first, third and fifth labels bearing a blue anchor, the second and fourth labels bearing a red cross.
Standard of HRH Prince Michael of Kent Banner of the Prince's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label, the first, third and fifth labels bearing a red cross, the second and fourth labels bearing a blue anchor.
1961 on Standard of HRH Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy Banner of the Princess's Coat of Arms, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom with a five-point label, the first and fifth labels bearing a red heart, the third label bearing a red cross, the second and fourth labels bearing a blue anchor.
Others[edit]
 
#6
Erm...the information on the standards of the members of the Royal Family, while interesting; I doesn't have anything to do with the question re. ceremonial dress
 
#11
I should imagine a royal such as the POW is allowed to wear whatever his mum says he can wear...
The present dress regs (June 2015) state on the subject: "Ceremonial Day Coats are worn by members of the Royal Family attaining flag rank, First Sea Lord, Admirals of the Fleet, full Admirals and the defence services secretary when a Naval Officer'-which explains why Prince William, despite being a Lieutenant RN, wears reefer jacket with sword and medals at the most formal occasions concerned with the Royal Navy despite being both a Royal and a Naval officer.
 

Purple_twiglet

War Hero
Moderator
#14
The present dress regs (June 2015) state on the subject: "Ceremonial Day Coats are worn by members of the Royal Family attaining flag rank, First Sea Lord, Admirals of the Fleet, full Admirals and the defence services secretary when a Naval Officer'-which explains why Prince William, despite being a Lieutenant RN, wears reefer jacket with sword and medals at the most formal occasions concerned with the Royal Navy despite being both a Royal and a Naval officer.
In the nicest possible way, why can this possibly matter. Its a uniform, they wear it as they wish. The world keeps on spinning and nothing changes. What is the problem we're trying to fix here exactly?
 

epsom salt

Lantern Swinger
#16
Erm...the information on the standards of the members of the Royal Family, while interesting; I doesn't have anything to do with the question re. ceremonial dress
One rule for the Highfalutin and another for the Hoi Polloi---It was ever thus.
Steer clear of the UK Armed Forces if you find such Protocol reprehensible.
 
#17
In the nicest possible way, why can this possibly matter. Its a uniform, they wear it as they wish. The world keeps on spinning and nothing changes. What is the problem we're trying to fix here exactly?
No problem; and it's not something that keeps me awake at night; it's just one of those historical curiosities which I find interesting. Granted, others may not, but that's not my concern.

Anyway; back to the question...
 

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