"Bomb Sight: Mapping the WW2 Bomb Census"

Discussion in 'History' started by sgtpepperband, Dec 7, 2012.

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  1. sgtpepperband

    sgtpepperband War Hero Moderator Book Reviewer

    The Bomb Sight project is mapping the London WW2 bomb census between 7/10/1940 and 06/06/1941. Previously available only by viewing in the Reading Room at The National Archives, Bomb Sight is making the maps available to citizen researchers, academics and students. They will be able to explore where the bombs fell and to discover memories and photographs from the period.

    The project has scanned original 1940s bomb census maps, geo-referenced the maps and digitally captured the geographical locations of all the falling bombs recorded on the original map. The data has then been integrated into 2 different types of applications:

    Web-Mapping Application

    [Coming soon] Android Mobile Phone Application with Augmented Reality
  2. Pure porn!!!
  3. Thanks SPB, read about that in today's Wail. Very interesting for those of us who experienced the London blitz at first hand. A few years ago whilst idling away my time at the London Metropolitan Archives, I discovered a drawer full of maps, covering Greater London, that portrayed the extent of bomb damage to individual buildings. Set out like the Booth poverty maps of the 1880s, a direct hit/complete destruction was coloured black, badly damaged requiring demolition dark blue, through the complete range of colours to yellow, indicating undamaged. Needless to say, black was the most popular shade. It never ceases to amaze me how any of us survived.

    The house in which we spent the 1940/41 era is still standing, occupied and looking very smart, having been thoroughly rejuvenated by a housing association. The one in which we sheltered from the V1s and V2s was demolished as unsafe, but not until the late 1960s!

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