Bodybuilding in the Navy?

#23
The biggest issue you will have as I've never had a problem with diet control while away on deployment is getting your various stacks of supplements shipped to you and then when you do its working out which 20% of them won't get you busted at CDT thesedays as you can get the boot for a high testosterone level!!

Si vis pacem, para bellum.

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Guns

War Hero
Moderator
#24
The issue for the Navy with bodybuilders who go to excess is they become a liability for damage control/firefighting. Basic stuff of not fitting in the gear to those with massive lats etc not being able to do simple tasks as their muscle formation restricts them from lifting above the shoulder level to hit wedges etc.

I understand the RM has the same issue but again functional related to load carry and CV issues.

The RN is moving towards functional fitness, RNFT now has strength load carrying and PT classes are moving towards circuit training like CrossFit etc. Bodybuilding, while fine for those that wish to partake does often mean that you have an individual who is less fit (CV wise) or not even able to perform certain generic tasks (DC/FF).

Plus there becomes that fine line over supplements and the affects they have. What if you can't get your supplements and end up buying local on deployment - how sure are you they are legal. And obviously steroids can be an issue.

That is not to say it is not possible, there are RN personnel who compete but they tend not to be on the very large/well defined side as training is harder to achieve with the equipment and time limitations.

For the OP it is possible but you must understand that the Navy has many restrictions that may stop you.
 

2cool

Lantern Swinger
#26
After reading guns post really I think the best way for you to continue bodybuilding would be to scrap all supplements, they're a waste of money anyway unless your taking illegal substances (which work but are not worth it for some many reasons).
 
#27
Strength load carry if your unit has the right equipment which my shiny tri-service one doesn't so they just sack it off.

Si vis pacem, para bellum

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 

FireMonkey

Lantern Swinger
#28
The RN is moving towards functional fitness, RNFT now has strength load carrying and PT classes are moving towards circuit training like CrossFit etc. Bodybuilding, while fine for those that wish to partake does often mean that you have an individual who is less fit (CV wise) or not even able to perform certain generic tasks (DC/FF).
I moved froma regular gym to a crossfit gym a couple of weeks ago and all I can say is that it really is the way to go. The mix of high intensity cardio and strength training is in my opinion far, far superior to the "bodybuilder" model of pick up heavy thing-put it down-rest-repeat for developing fitter athletes.
 
#31
Keep in shape, tone up and keep fit, ok, but I've never understood these blokes who want to look like a condom full of walnuts, arms bowed out like they are carrying rolls of invisible carpet, oiled up posing in front of a mirror, who are they lurking goooood for, if its self gratification, jack has different methods
 
#36
The issue for the Navy with bodybuilders who go to excess is they become a liability for damage control/firefighting. Basic stuff of not fitting in the gear to those with massive lats etc not being able to do simple tasks as their muscle formation restricts them from lifting above the shoulder level to hit wedges etc.

I understand the RM has the same issue but again functional related to load carry and CV issues.

The RN is moving towards functional fitness, RNFT now has strength load carrying and PT classes are moving towards circuit training like CrossFit etc. Bodybuilding, while fine for those that wish to partake does often mean that you have an individual who is less fit (CV wise) or not even able to perform certain generic tasks (DC/FF).

Plus there becomes that fine line over supplements and the affects they have. What if you can't get your supplements and end up buying local on deployment - how sure are you they are legal. And obviously steroids can be an issue.

That is not to say it is not possible, there are RN personnel who compete but they tend not to be on the very large/well defined side as training is harder to achieve with the equipment and time limitations.

For the OP it is possible but you must understand that the Navy has many restrictions that may stop you.
I'm sorry, were you talking about bodybuilding or field gun? ;)
 
#37
When he says body building I thing he means muscle rather than mass
No difference really I used to have a big powerful upper body, l let the training slip and so did my chest by about 2 foot scales still say the same, so all those years in a gym working up a sweat, should have spent more time working on plnt lifting
 

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