Black and white 1950s film clasics

Discussion in 'Films, Music, TV & All Things Artsy' started by jesse, Jul 18, 2011.

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  1. Sunday afternoon and pissing down,grey, windy and more November than July. So I passed the time with a trawl through Youtube.I'm a bit of a film buff[They can't get you for it] old and bold and the 1950s was my era and in many ways, music, hairstyle, clothing, I've stuck in a wonderful time warp. Anyway this trawl made me re realise just how many black and white great films were made in that time like ;- The man with the golden arm, Somebody up there likes me, A walk on the wild side, Champion, Ace in the hole, Picnic. Saturday night and Sunday morning came along in the early 60s as did Room at the top, A kind of loving,The L shaped room, and that one with Dora Brian and Rita Tusshingham [spelling?] Cannot recall the title F.F.S. The blackboard jungle, Knock on any door. All these,and the many I'll remember when I've posted,were gritty gutsy hard hitting well scripted and acted and all the more striking for being in black and white. They just do not make em like that any more. Fcuk I've missed From here to eternity. and just remembered the Dora Brian one was a Taste of honey. what are your favorites fron that era?
     
  2. Rita Tushingham was also in The Knack (1965) but don't forget Expresso Bongo (1959) and Alfie (1966). These gritty films contrasted starkly with the popular sugar-sweet Walt Disney classics of the day featuring Hayley Mills and the epic Hollywood musicals. Mind you, I hadn't long grown out of the ABC Minors (6d every Saturday morning) at the time.
     
  3. Winchester 73 (1950) James Stewart.
    Paths of Glory (1957) - Kirk Douglas.
    To Hell and Back (1955) - Audie Murphy.
    High Noon (1952) - Gary Cooper & Grace Kelly.
    Run Silent Run Deep (1958) - Clark Gable & Burt Lancaster.
    Brothers in Law (1957) - Terry Thomas & Ian Carmichael.
    Witness for the Prosecution (1957) - Charles Laughton. (One of my all time favourite films).

    SP.
     
  4. 12 Angry Men, 1957. No scenery, no women, no archive shots, no extras. Ninety two minutes all shot in one room, and a thoroughly gripping film. I watched it for the umpteenth time just a couple of weeks ago and am still able to lose myself in the plot. Vintage Henry Fonda.

    2BM
     
  5. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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    Everyone has their "15 minutes of fame".

    But Anthony Aloysius St John Hancock (RIP - late of 23 Railway Cuttings, East Cheam) had a whole H-h-h-alf hour.

    For the Younkers - In those days 'smut' referred only to those innocent little flecks of carbon, issued widely & liberally throughout the nation by courtesy of British Rail's steam locomotives

    These freebies were guaranteed to arrive at your eyeball/white front/stiff white collar long before the destination was ever reached, whether your carriage window was open or shut.

    For today's version of smut - See Witsend, and be sure to tell him that I sent you ... :wink:
     
  6. Jesse,

    Not quite the 50's (as it was released in 1960), but Psycho was a black and white classic ...

    As far as I can recall no-one was admitted once it had started (in Bedford there were always long queues & packed houses) and one was honour-bound not to reveal the plot. The soundtrack was just as hair-raising as the film itself. Hitchcock at his finest.

    Back to the '50s - there were usually two films per session, plus the Pathe Newreels and a cartoon - Then each performance culminated in the National Anthem, for which everyone stood to attention.

    It was only later that the end credits lasted almost as long as the film itself, and the imagination ran amok at the role of the 'Dolly Grip'. I suppose they would just be called 'fluffers' these days ...
     
  7. Mention of Expresso Bongo reminds me of another gritty drama of that era, Serious Charge.The vicar was accused of molesting smally boys . A taboo subject forthat time.
     

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