Bits for a Ham

sbkenn

Newbie
This seems like the best place to ask:
I own and live on an old Ham, Portisham, and am looking for a couple of original parts namely, Port prop, and, a very long shot, bronze anchors and chain. I understand that she was in a collision with a submarine at some stage and suspect that the prop was damaged, then replaced with a Manganese bronze one which is severely degraded now. The anchors and chain, I believe, were removed and sold prior to my buying the ship. It would be just the sort of thing that woman would do.
Any advice will be appreciated.

Shane
 

Wightsparker

War Hero
This seems like the best place to ask:
I own and live on an old Ham, Portisham, and am looking for a couple of original parts namely, Port prop, and, a very long shot, bronze anchors and chain. I understand that she was in a collision with a submarine at some stage and suspect that the prop was damaged, then replaced with a Manganese bronze one which is severely degraded now. The anchors and chain, I believe, were removed and sold prior to my buying the ship. It would be just the sort of thing that woman would do.
Any advice will be appreciated.

Shane

I presume you have researched the breakers' yards? Including vessels of the "Ley" and "Echo" classes?
 

sbkenn

Newbie
I presume you have researched the breakers' yards? Including vessels of the "Ley" and "Echo" classes?
Thanks, and periodically, yes. I have seen chain advertised, in very short lengths. No props or anchors though. I believe that there are 3 hams sunk of the gunnery range of S. Pembrokeshire, but have no idea how to go about getting permission to even survey, never mind recover anything from them. I would guess that diving would be prohibited in case of unexploded ordinance, but using an ROV might be permitted.
 

Wightsparker

War Hero
Thanks, and periodically, yes. I have seen chain advertised, in very short lengths. No props or anchors though. I believe that there are 3 hams sunk of the gunnery range of S. Pembrokeshire, but have no idea how to go about getting permission to even survey, never mind recover anything from them. I would guess that diving would be prohibited in case of unexploded ordinance, but using an ROV might be permitted.
What about those original shipbuilders which might still exist?
 

huwshpis

War Hero
Portisham was built by the Dorset Yacht Co, a company well-known to lawyers for its victory against the Home Office in a leading case in the law of torts. I don’t know if they still exist. The lead yard for the Ham class was Samuel White of Cowes, but they stopped building in 1963 and finally disappeared in 1981.
 

Wightsparker

War Hero
Might be worth contacting the Marine Society re spares. Found this bit courtesy of Google, but for some reason could not link to it.


Service history[edit]
In the late 1960s, two Ham-class minesweepers, HMS Powderham and HMS Yaxham were rebuilt as inshore survey vessels very similar to the Echos, although they could be identified by having an enclosed wheelhouse and a tripod mast. They were renamed HMS Waterwitch and Woodlark, respectively.

All ships were sold out of service in 1985. The Marine Society acquired two of the three vessels circa 1985 and converted them to training vessels. They were modified, from plans loaned by the Port of London Authority who had already purchased HMS Polsham in 1967 and converted her to a survey vessel, Maplin. The two vessels were renamed, Jonas Hanway and Earl of Romney, and were initially based and operated in conjunction with the Gravesend Sea School on the Thames at Denton. The third vessel is thought to have been included within the disposal package by the Ministry of Defence and acted as a spare parts source for the two operational vessels. Jonas Hanway sold 1999 and renamed HMS Egeria (A72), and As of 2010 under restoration.
 

dapperdunn

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Might be worth contacting the Marine Society re spares. Found this bit courtesy of Google, but for some reason could not link to it.


Service history[edit]
In the late 1960s, two Ham-class minesweepers, HMS Powderham and HMS Yaxham were rebuilt as inshore survey vessels very similar to the Echos, although they could be identified by having an enclosed wheelhouse and a tripod mast. They were renamed HMS Waterwitch and Woodlark, respectively.

All ships were sold out of service in 1985. The Marine Society acquired two of the three vessels circa 1985 and converted them to training vessels. They were modified, from plans loaned by the Port of London Authority who had already purchased HMS Polsham in 1967 and converted her to a survey vessel, Maplin. The two vessels were renamed, Jonas Hanway and Earl of Romney, and were initially based and operated in conjunction with the Gravesend Sea School on the Thames at Denton. The third vessel is thought to have been included within the disposal package by the Ministry of Defence and acted as a spare parts source for the two operational vessels. Jonas Hanway sold 1999 and renamed HMS Egeria (A72), and As of 2010 under restoration.
 

Similar threads


New Posts

Top