Bike Advice

#1
Hi all,

I will be returning to the UK in the autumn and will be looking for a bike to take me from Pompey (hopefully, but it will probably be Guzz knowing Drafty) to Nottingham most weekends all year round.

I have only recenlty passed my test (overseas but can transfer onto UK driving licence) and have a short (29") inside leg.

Any recommendations on what bike would be greatly appreciated.



'CYGNUS INTER ANATES'
Who said Tri-Service works?
 
#2
I used to commute Pompey to Guzz on a Honda CBR 600F. Goes well, good in the wet and reasonably comfortable. I took it to Nottingham once for curry and sex. Did Warwick services (M40) to Pompey without a fuel stop (124 miles).
I'm sure there are many others and advice will be numerous, but it worked for me.
 
#4
[I used to commute Pompey to Guzz on a Honda CBR 600F. Goes well, good in the wet and reasonably comfortable. I took it to Nottingham once for curry and sex. Did Warwick services (M40) to Pompey without a fuel stop (124 miles).
I'm sure there are many others and advice will be numerous, but it worked for me.]

Cheers mate, have been looking at them, the Thundercat and SV650S. Am a little concerned that a VTWIN will rattle the nuts off me over distance though. Looks like honda reliability will win out though.
 

FlagWagger

GCM
Book Reviewer
#5
sat_steam_x_conn said:
Hi all,

I will be returning to the UK in the autumn and will be looking for a bike to take me from Pompey (hopefully, but it will probably be Guzz knowing Drafty) to Nottingham most weekends all year round.

I have only recenlty passed my test (overseas but can transfer onto UK driving licence) and have a short (29") inside leg.

Any recommendations on what bike would be greatly appreciated.
I used to ride a Suzuki SV650S, a cracking bike with great handling, enough power to enjoy but not too much (it was my first post-test bike) and suitable for those with shorter legs.

If you're relatively new to biking, and are going to be doing long distances on the UK roads, I'd strongly recommend taking some additional advanced training - I came late to biking and found the IAM was a great way to build up the skills needed to maximise safety.

Cheers

Flags who recently moved countries and lost my bike licence as a result :(
 
#6
Concur with above SV650 is a good first post test bike
If you are weekending on a regular basis by bike, ensure you have some decent riding kit that's waterproof. You wont go far wrong with Hein Gericke gear, the cheaper Frank Thomas stuff is best avoided
heated grips are a must for winter and the the Oxford Cold Killers range are worth investing in
Best of luck shippers, I weekended Guzz-Gosport on my FJ1200 for 3 years all weathers
 

McHammock

Lantern Swinger
#7
Suzuki 600 Bandit (get the faired version) good grown up "starter" bike.
Concur with:
Heine Gericke - see Ride magazine for best buy kit.
Heated grips

Get a Scottoiler - triples the life of chain/sprockets
 
#8
I never needed heated grips, even in mid winter.
I just used glove liners, the silk ones.
Also never bothered with scottoilers either. Good chain wax and actually looking after the bike works much better ;)
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#9
Concur with all previous. Commuted from Guzz-Pompey every weekend whilst on Bulwark a couple of years ago, on a Ducati Monster S4. If only for the small tank I could've done the journey in less than 2.5 hours... :wink:

I wore a two-piece second-hand Frank Thomas, with a all-in-one Heine Gericke thermal body sock under my Ron Hills and Norgy top. Heated grips AND inner gloves were a must ('white knuckle' is not good for clutch control!), and I also invested in a decent set or ear plugs. Not the foam ones from bike shops, but some plastic ribbed ones (ooerr!) which I bought from HMV (used for festival/gig goers). Also if night riding, it is worth investing in some visor anti-glare spray, as headlights from oncoming traffic can be distracting on minor A and B roads. Also worth carrying a small tool kit with spare spark plugs and the number of your insurance company/roadside assistance service!

Finally it is worth doing the journey in day and night, to get used to the route. Driving the distance in a car is no problem, but on a bike it is much harder, physically. Until you're used to the route, take your time and ride safely, but be satisfied in the knowledge that you'll soon easily be able to overtake all vehicles stuck in traffic! :lol:
 
#10
Living in Hants and having Family in east Cornwall. I know every turn, corner, over taking spot on the feckin road, from Southampton to Guzz, but always took the Launceston route when it fully opened.

Bike, well my fj900 was opk, but the Trumpet Trophy 900 better, BUT its got a high inseem, like 32 inches, so if your a short arse, dip out. So what bike, mmmmmmm go to several dealers and check em out, then buy online on biketrader or better still Ebay. Bought my Trumpet Trophy 1200 from a guy in NJ. In the UK, I had a HG full wetsuit waterprrof gloves, and if I knew it would rain, put thick wooly socks on, then fet in a plazzie bag , then into me boots. Towel around my neck and I was as snug as a bug and bone dry......

Here its the heat.....uncomfortable from now til Oct, especially if you have a full face helmet, but if you wish, you can of course ride helmet free!
 
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