basic navy training.

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by jme_t, Aug 27, 2014.

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  1. Hi there all

    went for a navy interview and failed it first time, though he did tell me to come back and do it again (the recruiter) so I needed to brush up on my basic navy training knowledge. I have seen the pre joining 8 week fitness programme and trying to get that in my head whilst following it.

    is that what they want you to remember? because technically it does say pre joining fitness programme and the only actual info i can find on training is the

    rope climbing
    weekends in dartmouth
    etc (this is what i saw on the navy site when searching for basic training)

  2. What job are you going for?
  3. mine clearance diver
  4. Seamanship subjects maybe. Boat handling, knots and splices, compass points, signalling, lookout duties, ships husbandry (Derusting and painting), general cleaning, uniforms and bits and pieces, collar, silks, lanyard. Personal hygeine, uniform upkeep, spit and polish, leave, discipline and punishments, fire fighting, damage control, NBC subjects. And that's just a bit On the other hand if you haven't been told by the recruiter, ask him. Have a couple of visits to your local sea cadet/RNR units and have a shufty round, but don't nick anything on the way out.

    Ah, post just appeared. Mine Clearance Diver? Scrub the above and get used to yellow dusters, Mr Muscle Window Cleaner and mirrors. But good luck :cool:
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator


    If you’ve applied to join the Royal Navy as a Rating and have passed our recruit test, fitness test, medical and interview, you will need to attend a four-day induction course. This will allow you to sample life in the Royal Navy and confirm that you are ready for entry.

    The course runs at our Acquaint Centres in two locations: HMS Collingwood in Hampshire and MOD Caledonia in Rosyth.

    The course is designed to give you an introduction to life and work in the Royal Navy, including:

    • Our initial training programme for Ratings at HMS Raleigh
    • Our ethos and values
    • Kit, drill, discipline, teamwork and personal responsibilities
    • The working environment of a surface warship or submarine
    • Fitness standards and healthy living
    • Weapon handling
    You will also have to successfully complete two fitness tests:
    • A 2.4km run completed on a track within specific times
    • Swim 50 metres in under four minutes wearing a swimming costume without touching the bottom or sides of the pool. You must enter and exit the pool unaided and without using steps
    You must pass these tests to confirm you are ready to enter the Royal Navy. At the same time it's an opportunity for you to experience life in the Royal Navy and be sure you're ready for the challenges ahead. Once you've passed, you'll be offered a place at HMS Raleigh.

    PRNC Video:

    Initial Naval Training (Ratings)

    HMS Raleigh's mission is to take individuals from civilian life and train them in the core maritime skills of the Royal Navy so that they are ready in all respects, to start their professional trade training ten weeks later.

    Recruits come from all over the UK and overseas. Ranging from 16- year-olds to 37-year-olds, they are all looking for a unique challenge.

    At HMS Raleigh trainees are placed in classes of about 30. Over the next action-packed and challenging 10 weeks, the team complete targeted training which will enable them to develop the Royal Navy's core values of Commitment, Courage, Discipline, Respect, Integrity and Loyalty.

    They will learn some basic skills, such as self discipline, teamwork and overcoming problems. In addition, they will be taught how to fire a SA80 assault rifle and other skills required of all sailors.

    Recruits are given a taste of how to operate as a team tackling floods and fires at sea and they will also have to pass a first aid course. Fitness is crucial and a progressive regime will test individuals' ability to, climb High Ropes and complete the assault and obstacle courses.

    Training is as practical and active as possible, using simulators and a decommissioned warship to give recruits a real taste of their future careers and the environments in which they will work and fight. The latest technology is used to make classroom learning interesting and interactive.

    INT is physically and mentally challenging with a focus on teamwork and individual development. Most recruits think it's rewarding, enjoyable and underpinned by a strong sense of military discipline, integrity and personal pride.

    In addition to the regular Service recruits, new recruits to the Royal Navy Reserve also undertake their exceptionally busy two week induction course on site.

    Standing on the parade ground at the end of training is a proud occasion for all involved - recruits, instructors and the families and friends watching in the stands.

    • Like Like x 1
  6. I had mine a couple of months ago for MCD. I made sure I knew what all of the fitness requierments were and have adapted my training to accomodate all of the tests etc. Just general reading of this site helped me a lot, the basic training is the same for everyone so reading up on how everyone found it was quite easy. Know everything about your role.


    Just learn that inside out
  7. Paul_492 how far along with your application are you?you got a date for your PEDA yet?
  8. I have just sent my eye test results back. I've been in America all summer so have only just got back and starting to sort it all. Waiting for my medical date in Doncaster.
  9. yeah thats about the same as me, just got to wait for a minor setback on my medical to clear then got my pjft and divers medical. have you been told any potential date for your peda?

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