Armistice 2018

#2
I was told to wear a company lanyard, nobody has made comment on my pins, my SM lanyard hangs across my PC screen at work, 2018 pin added. I have managed to lose a few but do wear a poppy all year as remembrance Lanyard 2.jpg is a life time, not just a day.
 

huwshpis

Lantern Swinger
#5
How true, @Sumo.

I wear a poppy pin most of the time. My great-uncle was a perce in WWI (KRRC), went into the front line on day 4 of the Somme. At some point, he was captured by the Germans and released at the Armistice. He was clearly unwell at that point and was sent to a military hospital near Lyons, where he contracted Spanish flu and died in December 1918. He is buried in a CWGC cemetery in St-Germain-au-Pont-d'Or, and I managed to visit his grave in 2013. I may be the only member of the family to do so.

In WWII, my father and his brother were Merchant Navy officers serving in oil tankers, while my mother's two brothers were crabs. Father and his brother survived, although one of my father's ships (and the one fireman lost when she was torpedoed) is commemorated at the Merchant Navy War Memorial on Tower Hill, London, where I try to attend the memorial service every September. One crab uncle was based in Ceylon and survived the war, the other was trained as a bomb-aimer/navigator and killed on his first mission in December 1943. He is buried in Hanover Military Cemetery. I also visited his grave in 2013.

I have plenty of reasons to remember, but it all comes down to that little red flower..
 
#9
pinched from another site

In ocean wastes no poppies blow,

No crosses stand In ordered row,

There young hearts sleep ...beneath the wave...

The spirited, the good, the brave,

But stars a constant vigil keep,

For them who lie beneath the deep.

'Tis true you cannot kneel in prayer

On certain spot and think, "He's there."

But you can to the ocean go...

See whitecaps marching row on row;

Know one for him will always ride...

In and out ...with every tide.

And when your span of life is passed,

He'll meet you at the "Captain's Mast."

And they who mourn on distant shore

For sailors who'll come home no more,

Can dry their tears and pray for these

Who rest beneath the heaving seas...

For stars that shine and winds that blow

And white caps marching row on row.

And they can never lonely be

For when they lived...they chose the sea.

The poem is called 'In Waters Deep' and was written by Eileen Mahoney 2001
 
#10
I saw a boy marching, with medals on his chest,
He marched alongside Soldiers, marching six abreast,
He knew it was Remembrance Day, he walked along with pride,
And did his best to keep in step with the soldiers by his side.
And when the march was over, the boy looked rather tired;
A soldier said. "Whose medals son?" to which the boy replied,
"They belong to my Dad, but he didn't come back.
He died out in Afghanistan , up on a Helmand track".
The boy looked rather sad, and a tear came to his eye;
But the soldier said, "Don't worry son, I'll tell you why,"
He said, "Your dad marched with us today, all the bloomin way,
All us soldiers knew he was here, it's like that on Remembrance Day."
The boy looked rather puzzled - he didn't understand
But the soldier went on talking, and started to wave his hand,
"For this great land we live in, there's a price we have to pay,
To keep our Country free, and fly our flag today.
"Yes we all love fun and merriment in this country where we live,
But the price was that some soldier his precious life must give;
For you to go to school, my son, and worship God at will
Somebody had to pay the price, so our soldiers paid the bill.
"Your dad died for us my son, for all things good and true,
And I hope you can understand these words I've said to you".
The boy looked up at the soldier and after a little while,
His face changed expression, and he said with a beautiful smile,
"I know my dad marched here today, this our Remembrance Day,
I know he did, I know he did, all the bloomin way”
 
#14
There is a RN War Grave in The English Cemetery in the very centre of Malaga (and two RAF and one RAAF ones). It is the resting place of Lt Cdr Strickland from HMS Manchester and we lay a wreath on it. Every year there is a formal parade there, RBL, RAFA, RNA and lots of civvies - plus some puzzled Spanish! We used to get a RAF contingent from Gib, but the last few years they have been absent - politics and/or lack of manpower.
 
#16
This year we (RNA) will be parading in Huntingdon at 11am as per normal and then at 6pm in Godmanchester Church. Our local cadets are coming along this year after many years of being missed of the invites (Air Cadets only normally) , see below the message from the local vicar:

We're hoping that the silhouettes of 1st World War soldiers, each representing an individual named on the war memorial and that have been on display in front of people's homes all over Godmanchester, will be brought to the church that evening. If possible, we would like the cadets each to bring a silhouette into the church with them and place him in the pews. To that end, it would be good if we can have as many cadets present as possible, but I do know time is short and people have many commitments - we will be delighted to see any and all who can make it.

I'm usually a few sheets to the wind by the evening service as we normally spend all afternoon in the pub after the morning one, but the RNA are leading this year and if our cadet gets stage fright I may have to do the reading. A few quiet ones after the service in the local comrades club. Flying to Eindhoven next morning for a few days.
 

Similar threads

Top