Anyone joined ratings with a degree?

#5
Ill be joining (hopefully) as an MCD after my degree. Im hoping to get either a first or a 2:1 in sports science. Think of joining the RN in a positive way, for example, if youre wanting to do post grad study eventually then youll be able to save for the fees much more easily in the RN than on civi street.
If youre not interested in saving your money, then its good to know that, even if you join as a non diving/non submariner rating, your disposable income is probs still higher than many of your fellow graduating classmates will have. Many of your graduating classmates may not even have a job....
Even if you only did the minimum amount of service required after getting a degree, my bet is that your CV would be a lot more sought after than someone who didnt join the forces after uni, just because of all the opportunities youll get that they wont.
 
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(granny)

Banned
Book Reviewer
#6
Ok...so I am old and of another generation....but why, if you have the necessary educational qualifications, would you not try for a Commission ?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#8
There are dozens that join as Ratings/Other Ranks with a degree, usually because they don't have the full academic requirements for Officer or simply don't yet have the desire, experience or potential or perhaps ability to join as an officer directly. Many fail the Recruiting Test for Officer, which speaks volumes for degrees.

About a year or two back there was a Recruit Troop of 55 Marines, 17 of whom were graduates with an additional 12 qualified to apply for Officer from within the ranks. (Corps Commission).

For Officer specialisations that accept non-vocational degrees, such as Warfare, Aircrew, Logistics & Royal Marines, there is unfortunately the assumption by some that having a degree means they are naturally destined to be a commissioned officer, which is of course, complete nonsense. Why on earth the service offers nearly double the starting wage for a non-relevant degree defies any reasonable logic.

The intelligent graduate identifies that job satisfaction is probably better for some than a higher starting wage, particularly those that want to consolidate their theoretical academic qualifications with "hands-on" experience first, before attempting to manage those with the experience but not necessarily the qualifications.

There is a big switch taking place in education at present due to the cost of higher education, removal of EMA, increased tuition fees, etc. More people are preferring to join the workplace earlier, earn a wage & gain a degree & experience whilst working rather than racking-up a £40-50K debt learning theory. The end product is that a university graduate is very often going to be up to £100K worse-off (due to wages earned & student fees) with at least three years lost practical experience than their contemporaries who started a job, got a foundation degree simultaneously & topped it up to a full degree without debt. Universities are beginning to get desperate for 'bums on seats' to generate revenue but very often the degrees some currently offer only qualify the next bunch of tutors to perpetuate the cash cow.
 
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#9
Thanks for the quick reply.

What branches have they gone into SJRM? Anyone with 2:1? Is your pay increased?
Rick

Casting a glance over what you have written before, I see that you have asked about becoming a Training Management Officer on one occasion then an Officer in the Royal Naval Reserve on another. I get the impression that you are now considering applying as a Rating. You seem to be in a bit of a quandary as to the way to go which is right for you.

Could you tell us what you have in the way of qualifications at the moment? In which subject do you have a 2:1?

Do you have an idea as to which branch might appeal to you, based perhaps on previous jobs you have had or your interests?

How old are you?

Tell us a little more about yourself, so that we can perhaps guide you in a direction which might help you.
 

wave_dodger

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
I find this interesting. 19 years ago when I as a skooly I taught a class where an AEM with a maths degree helped me, recently I've been coaching a RAF Cpl with an ICS degree with his maths! Does make me wonder about the rigor behind education at the moment.

Anyway - degree or no degree, it makes no difference to a ratings initial salary. It may make said rating able to be accelerated to an UY, need to check that.

I always find it interesting that people equate degrees to the qualities expected of an Officer, and conversely some would say, not, of a rating.

Tees-Gal, what happens when after entry the Navy decides it doesn't need MCDs and instead might like to stick you on a fish boat, or a T23? You seem very sure of your future, the Navy seems to have the ability to do the exact opposite! You need to think wider, positive is good, but plan b,c and d will, I suggest, help you remain optimistic.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#11
One thing that is certainly apparent, is that besides the obvious benefit of 'life experience', nowadays a non-vocational degree is of questionable value in the workplace.
 

JW7121

Lantern Swinger
#12
Thanks for the quick reply.

What branches have they gone into SJRM? Anyone with 2:1? Is your pay increased?

I joined as a rating with a degree as a HM, and there was another lad on my course with a degree as well, but people go into all sorts of branches, it depends which branch appeals to the individual. And no, as a rating you dont get extra pay for having a degree.
 
#13
Rick

Casting a glance over what you have written before, I see that you have asked about becoming a Training Management Officer on one occasion then an Officer in the Royal Naval Reserve on another. I get the impression that you are now considering applying as a Rating. You seem to be in a bit of a quandary as to the way to go which is right for you.

Could you tell us what you have in the way of qualifications at the moment? In which subject do you have a 2:1?

Do you have an idea as to which branch might appeal to you, based perhaps on previous jobs you have had or your interests?

How old are you?

Tell us a little more about yourself, so that we can perhaps guide you in a direction which might help you.
Hi Soleil,

Really interested in joining. I've just finished my degree in product design and currently retaking my Maths GCSE. The intention was to join the RNR but I'm considering full time. I've just turned 24.

I'm interested in the CIS branch.

If I was to join as a rating, how long would it take to be considered for UY?

Thanks
Rick
 
#14
There are dozens that join as Ratings/Other Ranks with a degree, usually because they don't have the full academic requirements for Officer or simply don't yet have the desire, experience or potential or perhaps ability to join as an officer directly. Many fail the Recruiting Test for Officer, which speaks volumes for degrees.

About a year or two back there was a Recruit Troop of 55 Marines, 17 of whom were graduates with an additional 12 qualified to apply for Officer from within the ranks. (Corps Commission).

For Officer specialisations that accept non-vocational degrees, such as Warfare, Aircrew, Logistics & Royal Marines, there is unfortunately the assumption by some that having a degree means they are naturally destined to be a commissioned officer, which is of course, complete nonsense. Why on earth the service offers nearly double the starting wage for a non-relevant degree defies any reasonable logic.

The intelligent graduate identifies that job satisfaction is probably better for some than a higher starting wage, particularly those that want to consolidate their theoretical academic qualifications with "hands-on" experience first, before attempting to manage those with the experience but not necessarily the qualifications.

There is a big switch taking place in education at present due to the cost of higher education, removal of EMA, increased tuition fees, etc. More people are preferring to join the workplace earlier, earn a wage & gain a degree & experience whilst working rather than racking-up a £40-50K debt learning theory. The end product is that a university graduate is very often going to be up to £100K worse-off (due to wages earned & student fees) with at least three years lost practical experience than their contemporaries who started a job, got a foundation degree simultaneously & topped it up to a full degree without debt. Universities are beginning to get desperate for 'bums on seats' to generate revenue but very often the degrees some currently offer only qualify the next bunch of tutors to perpetuate the cash cow.
Completely agree with you there, I often feel my degree was a waste of time.. I'm still stuck in a shop I've worked in for 6 years..
 

(granny)

Banned
Book Reviewer
#20
There are dozens that join as Ratings/Other Ranks with a degree, usually because they don't have the full academic requirements for Officer or simply don't yet have the desire, experience or potential or perhaps ability to join as an officer directly. Many fail the Recruiting Test for Officer, which speaks volumes for degrees.

About a year or two back there was a Recruit Troop of 55 Marines, 17 of whom were graduates with an additional 12 qualified to apply for Officer from within the ranks. (Corps Commission).

For Officer specialisations that accept non-vocational degrees, such as Warfare, Aircrew, Logistics & Royal Marines, there is unfortunately the assumption by some that having a degree means they are naturally destined to be a commissioned officer, which is of course, complete nonsense. Why on earth the service offers nearly double the starting wage for a non-relevant degree defies any reasonable logic.

The intelligent graduate identifies that job satisfaction is probably better for some than a higher starting wage, particularly those that want to consolidate their theoretical academic qualifications with "hands-on" experience first, before attempting to manage those with the experience but not necessarily the qualifications.

There is a big switch taking place in education at present due to the cost of higher education, removal of EMA, increased tuition fees, etc. More people are preferring to join the workplace earlier, earn a wage & gain a degree & experience whilst working rather than racking-up a £40-50K debt learning theory. The end product is that a university graduate is very often going to be up to £100K worse-off (due to wages earned & student fees) with at least three years lost practical experience than their contemporaries who started a job, got a foundation degree simultaneously & topped it up to a full degree without debt. Universities are beginning to get desperate for 'bums on seats' to generate revenue but very often the degrees some currently offer only qualify the next bunch of tutors to perpetuate the cash cow.
Many thanks...the old saying is true....you can teach an old dog new 'tricks' things. I'm obliged.
 
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