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Another Newbie question from Powder, Regarding RN Degree

Powder

Lantern Swinger
http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/careers/upload/pdf/AW2_CNR_FAAMAA_4_3MB.pdf

This is probably going to come out gramatically horrible buttttt....

I am 17 and am applying as a Pilot for the FAA. I hope to do a degree with the RN. I am getting a bit confused about when exactly I will be doing it and how long it will be and where it is?

On page 16/17 on the MAS .PDF manual it says the following;
List of venues (north to south)
• RNAS Culdrose, Cornwall
• RNAS Yeovilton, Somerset
• RAF Wittering, Cambridgeshire
• DHFS Shawbury, Shropshire
• RAF Valley, Anglesey

Presumably I will be able to study Military aviation studies (foundation degree) and then go onto an honours and masters at one of these venues?
I won't be able to do my degree at BRNC in Dartmouth?


Also, if you look at the Pilot Pipeline on page 4/17, where exactly would the degree be placed? Would the degree be done first, and then when that is completed and the student has graduated, then he/she begins Flying Grading and the DO course?
And finally, How long is the initial foundation degree of MAS? What are the options to choose from for the Honours and Masters programs, how long are they? If you choose to do these, would you then start at BRNC afterwards, or begin BRNC whilst studying for the masters for example.

This is really, really confusing the hell out of me, and if it is explained simply, it will be VERY much appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Powder
 

airborne_artist

Lantern Swinger
The ordinary degree is awarded on successful completion of flying training (not just to wings, but the completion of conversion to type, I'm fairly sure).

The RN then (I think) will pay the OU for you to self-study to take the degree to Honours level, which is about another 2.5 years, minimum, though bear in mind that you'll be a tad busy on your first squadron at that time.
 

Powder

Lantern Swinger
Thanks both of you. This is something like I was looking for;
http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/operati...he-west-country/*/changeNav/3533/noRedirect/1

It says that the foundation degree program begins after the 3 terms at BRNC and the DO course. Then you can pick up the honours and masters whenever you are training?
Surely it must be really hard to complete flight training / sorties and be studying for a degree at the same time?

So if I got into doing this degree program, it would begin after I have done officer training, DO course and 1 week of survival training at BRNC.
 

airborne_artist

Lantern Swinger
While the degree is good, you have to look at the fact that it's not from Cambridge, Oxford or Harvard. If you are a pilot you may well want to carry on flying when you leave, in which case a degree makes no odds, it's licences, interviews and check rides in the sim that get you a job.

For observers it's a bit different, as they may well go into a civilian role that's nothing to do with the military or aviation (though lots seem to end up in the defence industry). In that case a degree is good, though by the time you are 30 odd, of less interest than your professional skillset.

However, you have to bear in mind that despite all the glossy brochures, some people do not complete flying training. They find it's not for them, or they get chopped, or they get a medical cat that stops them flying. Some may go to the Fleet, but many leave. With a half-finished degree that they can't pick up elsewhere.

So, if you are bright enough to get a degree there's nothing to stop you getting good A levels, get on to a good, relevant degree course (Physics/IT/engineering, perhaps) and joining as a grad. The £28k will rapidly pay off your loan, and if you bang out you've got a good degree to make your way in Civvy Street.

It's just my opinion, so take it as that. But bear in mind I've a) been there, and b) have a daughter who wants to go there too. She's taking option B, as you would expect.
 

Powder

Lantern Swinger
airborne_artist said:
While the degree is good, you have to look at the fact that it's not from Cambridge, Oxford or Harvard. If you are a pilot you may well want to carry on flying when you leave, in which case a degree makes no odds, it's licences, interviews and check rides in the sim that get you a job.

For observers it's a bit different, as they may well go into a civilian role that's nothing to do with the military or aviation (though lots seem to end up in the defence industry). In that case a degree is good, though by the time you are 30 odd, of less interest than your professional skillset.

However, you have to bear in mind that despite all the glossy brochures, some people do not complete flying training. They find it's not for them, or they get chopped, or they get a medical cat that stops them flying. Some may go to the Fleet, but many leave. With a half-finished degree that they can't pick up elsewhere.

So, if you are bright enough to get a degree there's nothing to stop you getting good A levels, get on to a good, relevant degree course (Physics/IT/engineering, perhaps) and joining as a grad. The £28k will rapidly pay off your loan, and if you bang out you've got a good degree to make your way in Civvy Street.

It's just my opinion, so take it as that. But bear in mind I've a) been there, and b) have a daughter who wants to go there too. She's taking option B, as you would expect.
If I make it through, then after I leave, I plan on flying commercial. I know its a lot to do with licenses/interviews/ and time in simulators, but I have also spoken to a lot of commercial airline pilots (and recruiters for BA) and they have all said it is very, very rare to get a job commercially without a degree (even if it isnt relevent). I don't wish to do a degree in something I am not interested in, and I think that doing it in the RN is good because I can do it in my own time and its fully paid for.
I just want to fly the best planes in the world and get paid to do it! :lol:

I have several good backup plans, that if the RN doesnt work out for some reason, I can do instead.
 

captainobvious

Lantern Swinger
if you want to fly the best planes in the world, join the RAF, the FAA doesn't have much in the way of cutting edge technology.
 

R077

MIA
I hope I'm not going barmy, I do remember a certain cheeky post earlier in the thread that appears to have gone walkabout.. I personally thought it was better left in. :lol:

EDIT: mixed up threads, disregard.
 

Powder

Lantern Swinger
captainobvious said:
if you want to fly the best planes in the world, join the RAF, the FAA doesn't have much in the way of cutting edge technology.
I considerd that, but I prefer the lifestyle of the Navy more so, and when the F35s enter service :twisted: :lol:
 

R077

MIA
Powder said:
captainobvious said:
if you want to fly the best planes in the world, join the RAF, the FAA doesn't have much in the way of cutting edge technology.
I considerd that, but I prefer the lifestyle of the Navy more so, and when the F35s enter service :twisted: :lol:

Why would you want to join the Chairforce?
 

captainobvious

Lantern Swinger
I wouldn't want to base my entire career on the possibility that the RN will get F35, especially if you're in the process of applying now.
 

cadetsmum

Lantern Swinger
airborne_artist said:
While the degree is good, you have to look at the fact that it's not from Cambridge, Oxford or Harvard. .....

...... With a half-finished degree that they can't pick up elsewhere.

.

Whilst I agree that the OU is not in the same league as Cambridge/Oxford/Havard it is a well respect University, even if it's not a bricks and mortar University.......just have a look at the various league tables.

Many of the programmes, especially on the BBC, are made in conjunction with the OU.

One of the reasons people who come from the Ou with degrees are so well respected is that they've not only had to study/revise/submit regular assignments but they've had to juggle working/family commitments as well....so yes it is harder than going to a conventional Uni.

The advantage of doing a degree with the OU though is that I would imagine that if the OP, for example, started such a degree via the RN but left before completing it, he could still complete the Ou degree.
 

Powder

Lantern Swinger
captainobvious said:
I wouldn't want to base my entire career on the possibility that the RN will get F35, especially if you're in the process of applying now.
When did I say that I was only joining the RN for the F35... That is just a pro. Heck, I will be lucky to end up flying heli's.

Cadetsmum - That is what I was thinking. I won't be able to go to Oxbridge/Harvard anway, and a degree is a degree. It will also give me something extra to work on and will get hopefully quite a bit back in return.
 

airborne_artist

Lantern Swinger
Whilst I agree that the OU is not in the same league as Cambridge/Oxford/Havard it is a well respect University, even if it's not a bricks and mortar University.......just have a look at the various league tables.

The OU may be able to transfer the credits earned to a new course, but it's not something to bank on.
 

cadetsmum

Lantern Swinger
The OU don't do convential courses in the sense of a bricks and mortar Uni - basically you have to do courses of sufficient level to get a degree.

So for an OU degree you have to courses that total 360 points (each OU course is allocated usually either 30 or 60 points depending on work level) and for an honours degree 120 of those points have to be at level 3 (there are 3 levels to OU courses and to get a degree in any event, 240 have to be at level 2 or above)

For 'named' degrees you have to do certain courses - other wise students have free reign over their course choice.

I would be very surprised if you couldn't take the courses done via the RN and complete your OU degree on civiee street if necessary.
 
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