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An amazing picture

Always_a_Civvy said:
USS Enterprise? Is that the same as the Starship Enterprise? Or worst still, the Herald of Free Enterprise... :? :roll:

You know how the US gets, They'll have a USS Scotty next :wink:
 
cheers for the heads-up Fish-M i'm a WAFU, if it came to me putting in wedges we'd be in the shit, the instructors on Whale Island could tell you! ( thanks for the cue cards at the window of the engine room guys) then again chances are it would be a weekend so we would be saved by the proper sailors whilst we rested. "partial CAG" :lol:
 
fishmiester said:
dunkers said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Barham_(1914)

As she rolled over to port, her magazines exploded and the ship quickly sank with the loss of over two-thirds of her crew.

Not sure why sea water would cause the boilers to explode? - would the compression caused by the water rushing in cause the boilers to burst, or something?

I'm not sure either, not being a stoker. Is it an urban myth then that boilers explode when the sea water hits them??
Rapid cooling etc

No, that's definately X and Y turret deep magazines cooking off. The four open fronted boilers wouldn't produce that kind of energy to explode like that. All you would see is clouds and clouds of steam. The tubes would probably rupture once in contact with cold seawater, but the speed that ship has capsized. I would wager that most of the engine and boiler room would be floooded with superheated steam anyway as most of the main engines come adrift and the auxiliaries come free from their seats. It would have been a grizly detah for those trapped below, and in total darkness, as well.

Levers
 
fishmiester said:
dunkers said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Barham_(1914)

As she rolled over to port, her magazines exploded and the ship quickly sank with the loss of over two-thirds of her crew.

Not sure why sea water would cause the boilers to explode? - would the compression caused by the water rushing in cause the boilers to burst, or something?

I'm not sure either, not being a stoker. Is it an urban myth then that boilers explode when the sea water hits them??
Rapid cooling etc

The PO Stoker on the computer next door says that the water going down the funnel hitting the furnace, because of the heat there is a flash off of steam, and he thinks hydrogen might form? He denies all knowledge now that he is a civvie! I have no idea, I am a lawyer!
 
Any physicists on RR who can solve this mystery... or superintelligent stokers? I'm a bit dubious about the generation of hydrogen at these relativly low temperatures though - superheated steam, yes, but hydrogen gas?

Come on you physicists!
 
Always_a_Civvy said:
Any physicists on RR who can solve this mystery... or superintelligent stokers? I'm a bit dubious about the generation of hydrogen at these relativly low temperatures though - superheated steam, yes, but hydrogen gas?

Come on you physicists!

You maybe right, the PO Stoker next door was not being very helpful when I told him what I was doing so perhaps he was talking b*ll*cks just to make me look an idiot!
 
fishmiester said:
Re The Barham

Is it really the Magazines blowing or is it when the sea water hits her boilers.

I have watched the film a couple of times and the explosion seens to occur just as the water rushes down the funnels??

I'm with the boiler explosion theory myself. Listen carefully to the video and you can hear the steam rushing out. No doubt a rush of cold sea water onto very hot boiler tubes could cause a crack with disastrous consequences. Bear in mind there would probably also have been fuel tanks under the boilers whose tank lids could have leaked as the ship turned slowly over. This could have also caused the explosion.
 
Probably a combination of boilers and magazine, the official view is the cause has never been determined,
See a brutal picture like that though, it certainly brings it home to you. (shudder)

...
 
Levers_Aligned said:
fishmiester said:
dunkers said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Barham_(1914)

As she rolled over to port, her magazines exploded and the ship quickly sank with the loss of over two-thirds of her crew.

Not sure why sea water would cause the boilers to explode? - would the compression caused by the water rushing in cause the boilers to burst, or something?

I'm not sure either, not being a stoker. Is it an urban myth then that boilers explode when the sea water hits them??
Rapid cooling etc

No, that's definately X and Y turret deep magazines cooking off. The four open fronted boilers wouldn't produce that kind of energy to explode like that. All you would see is clouds and clouds of steam. The tubes would probably rupture once in contact with cold seawater, but the speed that ship has capsized. I would wager that most of the engine and boiler room would be floooded with superheated steam anyway as most of the main engines come adrift and the auxiliaries come free from their seats. It would have been a grizly detah for those trapped below, and in total darkness, as well.

Levers

I take it you've never seen photographs of the devestation caused by a boiler explosion then.
 
Probably is a combo of mags plus boilers.

Hot steel boiler + cold sea water = thermal shock = material fracture

material fracture + high pressure = big bang.....
 

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