Am new

Countyroadkopite

Midshipman
Rumrat said:
Countyroadkopite said:
Thanks white-mafia am on it :wink: . rumrat that had alot of effort cheers for that , I take it your from manchester then fella , apart from the usual football politics you lot arnt that bad , worked in and around manchester most of my painting life good crack .mainly with the city crowd for some reason thou :lol:

I am a man u sado, :oops: but only lived in Salford for two years.
I'm Australian by birth, English by choice. :D :wink:
A ozzy living in england seriously why ?I would love to live over there . My uncle moved to perth 15 years ago built a lovely house with a pool and all the trimming's was made up with himself and guess who moved in 1 year later and has lived there driving him crazy ever since ......... A MAN UNITED FAN :lol: sodds law
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
white_mafia said:
soleil said:
Countyroadkopite said:
soleil said:
Do you know where the term "Scouse" comes from, by the way, CountyRoadKopite?
From


Scouse was brought to Liverpool by Northern European sailors, it was originally called Labskause. This was finally shortened to Skause and over time the spelling changed to the more Anglicised version we have today, Scouse.

The people who ate Scouse were all generally sailors and their families and eventually all sailors within Liverpool were referred to as Scousers. Time has now taken its turn and everyone from the region of Liverpool is known as a Scouser. Or a Tosser if thats how you see us :lol:

Yes; spot on. I had known for ages that the word "Scouse" came from a foodstuff, but had never thought any more about it until I was in Hamburg. There is a church in the port called St Michaelis Kirche (which sits on a hill and is traditionally the point sailors always look out for when coming up the River Elbe into Hamburg); just by the church, there is a restaurant serving traditional Hamburg dishes and I had dinner there one evening. The speciality of the house is a dish called Labskaus, made from corned beef, potatoes, onion, herring and beetroot and served with a slice of gherkin, a rollmop and a fried egg; it's very nice.

On the menu, it tells you about the history of the dish. It said that the dish was a favourite of the sailors of Hamburg, especially as it could be made on board the sailing ships they crewed, as salted beef, potatoes and beetroot could be stored and preserved on their ships. One of the regular routes for them was Hamburg to Liverpool; they took their favourite food with them and shared it with the local sailors there, who took to it and adopted it. This was a couple of centuries ago. Over the next century, Liverpudlians made it their regional dish, changed the recipe a bit and shortened its name from Labskaus to Skaus, then Scouse, making it their own and thus becoming known as Scousers.

I'll bet you made for the same attractions in Hamburg as I did Sol.

I went to a nice shopping mall called the Eros Centre when I was last there.
 

soleil

War Hero
white_mafia said:
soleil said:
Countyroadkopite said:
soleil said:
Do you know where the term "Scouse" comes from, by the way, CountyRoadKopite?
From


Scouse was brought to Liverpool by Northern European sailors, it was originally called Labskause. This was finally shortened to Skause and over time the spelling changed to the more Anglicised version we have today, Scouse.

The people who ate Scouse were all generally sailors and their families and eventually all sailors within Liverpool were referred to as Scousers. Time has now taken its turn and everyone from the region of Liverpool is known as a Scouser. Or a Tosser if thats how you see us :lol:

Yes; spot on. I had known for ages that the word "Scouse" came from a foodstuff, but had never thought any more about it until I was in Hamburg. There is a church in the port called St Michaelis Kirche (which sits on a hill and is traditionally the point sailors always look out for when coming up the River Elbe into Hamburg); just by the church, there is a restaurant serving traditional Hamburg dishes and I had dinner there one evening. The speciality of the house is a dish called Labskaus, made from corned beef, potatoes, onion, herring and beetroot and served with a slice of gherkin, a rollmop and a fried egg; it's very nice.

On the menu, it tells you about the history of the dish. It said that the dish was a favourite of the sailors of Hamburg, especially as it could be made on board the sailing ships they crewed, as salted beef, potatoes and beetroot could be stored and preserved on their ships. One of the regular routes for them was Hamburg to Liverpool; they took their favourite food with them and shared it with the local sailors there, who took to it and adopted it. This was a couple of centuries ago. Over the next century, Liverpudlians made it their regional dish, changed the recipe a bit and shortened its name from Labskaus to Skaus, then Scouse, making it their own and thus becoming known as Scousers.

I'll bet you made for the same attractions in Hamburg as I did Sol.


I'm not so sure about that myself, white_mafia!! :lol:
 

Andy_Cap

War Hero
white_mafia said:
Countyroadkopite said:
soleil said:
Do you know where the term "Scouse" comes from, by the way, CountyRoadKopite?
From


Scouse was brought to Liverpool by Northern European sailors, it was originally called Labskause. This was finally shortened to Skause and over time the spelling changed to the more Anglicised version we have today, Scouse.

The people who ate Scouse were all generally sailors and their families and eventually all sailors within Liverpool were referred to as Scousers. Time has now taken its turn and everyone from the region of Liverpool is known as a Scouser. Or a Tosser if thats how you see us :lol:

Not tossers at all. Originally from the Black Country (Coventry) known for its coal and industrial might - now known as the Black Country for its mosques and complete absence of white people.

Also fond of other regional accents - Geordie, Brissul, Janner, - its what once put the Great in Britain.

<Coventry Black Country ??? No way. No way at all.
 

Guzzler

War Hero
Countyroadkopite said:
Certainly do mate its named after a hill in africa were many scouser's died fighting during the boar war :wink:
Anyway thanks guys :D

If that's the case why do so many other teams have 'kops'? And why wasn't Anfield even the first?
 

JonnoJonno

Banned
Guzzler said:
Countyroadkopite said:
Certainly do mate its named after a hill in africa were many scouser's died fighting during the boar war :wink:
Anyway thanks guys :D

If that's the case why do so many other teams have 'kops'? And why wasn't Anfield even the first?

The other teams use 'kops' to celebrate that so many dirty Scousers died.
 

soleil

War Hero
Guzzler said:
Countyroadkopite said:
Certainly do mate its named after a hill in africa were many scouser's died fighting during the boar war :wink:
Anyway thanks guys :D

If that's the case why do so many other teams have 'kops'? And why wasn't Anfield even the first?

Anfield's was the first stand to be officially named "The Kop" (in 1928).

Apparently, the first time the word was ever used in this context was by a journalist watching Woolwich Arsenal in 1904 - he thought that fans standing on a bank of earth reminded him of soldiers standing on a hill at the Battle Of Spion Kop, but the name wasn't used by the club for any part of their ground, in the way that Liverpool did.

It was just two years later that the Sports Ed of the Liverpool Echo mentioned that the new embankment at Anfield was being called "Spion Kop" and this time, the name was adopted by the club.

I get the impression that the name became common in the early 20th century for stands with a certain look - one tier and terraced and usually behind the goal. Football reporting (immensely popular) in the newspapers (massive circulations) would have informed readers about Liverpool's Kop and the word must have slipped into common parlance and thus been used to name stands at other clubs.
 
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