All Chiefs and no Indians?

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Nippit

Guest
#1
Degree degradation: With too many university graduates and not enough jobs, many are finding themselves woefully underemployed.


Is this a problem in today's Armed Forces? Or likely to become one?
 
#4
Degree degradation: With too many university graduates and not enough jobs, many are finding themselves woefully underemployed.


Is this a problem in today's Armed Forces? Or likely to become one?
No problem, as the post war baby boomers retire, there will be shed loads of jobs, but that may require some to actually work, that may be the Armed Forces issue trying to convince those that can qualify to join, to work for a living, and not take a cushy number elsewhere.
 
N

Nippit

Guest
#5
No problem, as the post war baby boomers retire, there will be shed loads of jobs, but that may require some to actually work, that may be the Armed Forces issue trying to convince those that can qualify to join, to work for a living, and not take a cushy number elsewhere.
I'm sure that will be the case but those posts that "may require some actually to work" will the jobs that are vacant need someone with a first degree to fill them?
 
#6
I'm sure that will be the case but those posts that "may require some actually to work" will the jobs that are vacant need someone with a first degree to fill them?
Obviously a degree in geography says you can read and write, there are a lot of youngsters realising Uni was a good party, now they have to find work, some will have taken the right path and have work a plenty on offer some will find the good idea degree isn't worth much, so not over qualified just stayed in school to long.
 
N

Nippit

Guest
#7
Obviously a degree in geography says you can read and write, there are a lot of youngsters realising Uni was a good party, now they have to find work, some will have taken the right path and have work a plenty on offer some will find the good idea degree isn't worth much, so not over qualified just stayed in school to long.
You will know better than I do if the Armed Forces are suffering recruitment problems where applicants are over-qualified for the more mundane jobs. It must produce problems I would have thought. Apart from the Schoolies and the odd NS Meteorologist few had degrees in my day. They did have professional qualifications of course. My own brother who was an Engineer Officer ex CERA and an AMIMarE.
 
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#8
You will know better than I do if the Armed Forces are suffering recruitment problems where applicants are over-qualified for the more mundane jobs. It must produce problems I would have thought. Apart from the Schoolies and the odd NS Meteorologist few had degrees in my day. They did have professional qualifications of course. My own brother who was an Engineer Officer ex CERA and an AMIMarE.
I don't know what era you served but degrees were also uncommon in my day (stand fast medical men and engineers) even amongst the occifer core.
However now that every kid is actively encouraged to go to Uni and get a degree this level of qualification has almost become the standard. The fact that many of these degrees are about as much use as a cat flap on a submarine is irrelevant, it is a degree in the eyes of the holder and they expect to be paid top wack for possessing this useless bit of paper.
Looks like after trying to flog themselves to possible employers who realise the value of said degree they see sense and join the RN.
 
#10
I don't know what era you served but degrees were also uncommon in my day (stand fast medical men and engineers) even amongst the occifer core.
However now that every kid is actively encouraged to go to Uni and get a degree this level of qualification has almost become the standard. The fact that many of these degrees are about as much use as a cat flap on a submarine is irrelevant, it is a degree in the eyes of the holder and they expect to be paid top wack for possessing this useless bit of paper.
Looks like after trying to flog themselves to possible employers who realise the value of said degree they see sense and join the RN.
We had a catflap, most called it the torpedo loading hatch:D
 
N

Nippit

Guest
#11
I don't know what era you served but degrees were also uncommon in my day (stand fast medical men and engineers) even amongst the occifer core.
However now that every kid is actively encouraged to go to Uni and get a degree this level of qualification has almost become the standard. The fact that many of these degrees are about as much use as a cat flap on a submarine is irrelevant, it is a degree in the eyes of the holder and they expect to be paid top wack for possessing this useless bit of paper.
Looks like after trying to flog themselves to possible employers who realise the value of said degree they see sense and join the RN.
You are absolutely right. Some of the smaller ships I served on had the Cox'n as its doctor. Very good at their job they were too. Father figure, Master at Arms, Cox'n on the wheel at Action Stations and Doctor. Probably didn't even have an ET1. What strong characters they were. How would they have been improved with a First Class Degree in Media Studies, or a Double First in Logic. The CERA and Cmd Engineer probably had passed their School Cert and possibly with the HET under their belts.
 
#12
when had my first interviews. After leaving the mob, the directors interviewing had low level qualifications, but the advert was for degree, his explanation was, when he used to do the recruiting, junior manager, he looked for people of similar quals, after a time, ONC, HNC etc started to join, when they became the Recruiter they looked for same quals and so on when the degree applicants' started to join. At my current place a good Eng. Grad can start on about£30k, non required degree are taken into account but mainly show a education level, you will only be offered the role you apply for,may start a little of the bottom, but not far.
 
#13
You will know better than I do if the Armed Forces are suffering recruitment problems where applicants are over-qualified for the more mundane jobs. It must produce problems I would have thought. Apart from the Schoolies and the odd NS Meteorologist few had degrees in my day. They did have professional qualifications of course. My own brother who was an Engineer Officer ex CERA and an AMIMarE.
AMIMarE is not a qualification, it's an institute all tiffs are qualified to join at Associate Membership level. I never bothered as it's pretty pointless and a waste of money, unless you like post nominals on your letter heads.
 
#14
I don't know what era you served but degrees were also uncommon in my day (stand fast medical men and engineers) even amongst the occifer core.
However now that every kid is actively encouraged to go to Uni and get a degree this level of qualification has almost become the standard. The fact that many of these degrees are about as much use as a cat flap on a submarine is irrelevant, it is a degree in the eyes of the holder and they expect to be paid top wack for possessing this useless bit of paper.
Looks like after trying to flog themselves to possible employers who realise the value of said degree they see sense and join the RN.

Seems my decision to go Warfare Officer instead of uni is a good choice.

I have the power of foresight!
 
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Nippit

Guest
#15
AMIMarE is not a qualification, it's an institute all tiffs are qualified to join at Associate Membership level. I never bothered as it's pretty pointless and a waste of money, unless you like post nominals on your letter heads.
Seems to be called something new.
The only reason I knew anything about it was recently when I looked at some documents of his when he had left the Navy and was the Marine Superintendent in Hong Kong. Later papers show him as FiMarE. I've no idea that it wasn't a professional Qualification. Whatever it is it's now called something else.


The IMarEST is an international membership body and learned society that brings marine engineers, marine scientists and marine technologists together into one multi-disciplinary professional body.

The largest marine organisation of its kind, it spans 128 countries and works to promote the scientific development of marine engineering, science and technology, providing opportunities for the exchange of ideas and practices and upholding the status, standards and expertise of marine professionals worldwide.

Education is supported through Marine Learning Alliance Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of the IMarEST Group that delivers marine education and training courses primarily through distance e-learning.

The IMarEST is an NGO with consultative status at the International Maritime Organization (IMO), observer status at the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, International Hydrographic Organization, the London Convention/London Protocol (LC/LP) and the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) and it has special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC), which facilitates its access to other international intergovernmental meetings where its specialised marine expertise is of particular use, e.g., the United Nations meetings on Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the work of the International Seabed Authority on marine mining.

Licensed to award:

  • Chartered Scientist (CSci)
The Institute is also licensed by the Engineering Council to award Chartered Engineer, IEng and EngTech.

 

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