Aircrewman?!?!

Discussion in 'The Fleet Air Arm' started by seanie88, Apr 16, 2009.

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  1. Right I know that what i'm asking has probably already been answered in depth.

    But I can't find it so i though i'd ask again :)

    what's actually involved and how hard is it to transfer into aircrewman ?
    i just want to know about getting into it form a diffrent branch and what i will need to do to help myself get there so things; like how smart do you have to be for example, do you need a certain level on the naval entry test's that you have to do for leadership corses and passing out off raleigh??

    any help would be great

    many thanks

    Sean :)
     
  2. Waspie - (doug) will give you the best answer as he was an underslung load for years :lol:
     
  3. Thanks for that!!!!

    I was an aircrewie. However that was some 17 years ago now.

    The branch has changed out of all context to the knowledge I have. (I learned that on here). :?

    However it would be safe to say you have to be well motivated and have an aptitude to accept change at the drop of a hat. In aviation, nothing goes as planned.

    Applying is the easy bit. Simply fill in a request form and the ball will be set in motion.

    The upper age is 26. No idea what academic quals, it used to be NAMET 3 - 3, but I am informed NAMET has gone!!! You need to be passed for Leading Hand as you will get your hook if you don't already have it at. (At some stage during or on completion of training.)

    Aircrewmen are employed in the navy to operate the sensors on ASW helicopters. Thats Sonar passive and active.

    In the Junglie, (Commando), role, they will learn all about things green. How the marines and army are set up, troops, platoon sizes etc. map reading at low level will be taught. It's not all GPS.

    You will also be required to attend a ground school and learn all about the particular helicopter you will be flying, their systems, operation and parameters.

    I will not kid you, it is a hard slog and you can be removed at any stage if you are not cutting it. (It has been known for qualified crewmen to be returned to previous trade for poor performance.)

    Training doesn't stop after initial training, every six months to a year you will be tested by what we called 'trappers' Rotary Wing Standards Flight, they will check you out on the ground and in the air.

    Only when you have done a tour on ASW or Junglie will you be able to apply for the glamour units - sorry - Search and Rescue.!!!!

    All in all if you pass and get the coveted wings on your arm you are entering probably one of the most satisfying jobs in the world.

    Hopefully a current serving Aircrewman will be along and give you the up to date info. One last thing, don't expect people to fall over to help you , a lot of the work is up to you, or it was 17 years ago.
     
  4. BR 1066 and your DO are the first port of call.
     
  5. Excellent thanks a lot that’s answered a lot of my questions :)

    And thanks for the link that’s actually the one I was looking for :) but I can't be to meticulous at work :-(

    I am very serious about becoming a ‘crewie’ but its fairly hard to find information on them via the RN home page.

    And my AFCO said I was better off joining and transferring across than waiting for the possibility of it becoming a straight entry branch.

    Thanks again for all your help.

    Sean.
     
  6. Sean, you will not find a great deal on formal Navy sites. The Aircrewman branch is at this moment in time a 'sideways' transfer from within all trades within the RN. There is talk about going direct entry in the future. With that I would assume they will up the anti regards ed quals, as a bonus I would also assume that Petty Officer would be the minimum rank so as to fall in line with the crabs. Must add, they are my personal views based on rumour and chats with colleagues within.

    Don't know what trade you are, but some trades have distinct advantages. Example, if a sonar operator then you will be streets ahead if you get selected. To my knowledge current trades have no bearing on selection. But if successful then as a sonar op you will have base knowledge a lot of others won't have. Example me! I was an aircraft engineer and found the sonar and oceanography a total learning curve. My oppo, a fish head sonar rate pissed it.

    If I was you and you are serious and it's not to escape from your current trade. Make it known immediately to your DO. Get the ball rolling now. It isn't a five minute thing. Alternatively if your not a serving matelot, then you are looking at a few years from joining as you have to have passed for Leading Hand, that depending on trade can take a few years.

    Also be advised the medical is very stringent. On my intake for want of a better word, one chap came out with five appointments to see specialists for conditions the docs found during the medical. They will check everything. Measure every inch of fat on you and then only if 100% will you be passed medically fit to proceed to training. Then there is selection where your mental agility will be tested. Ending in an in depth interview that will suss out if you re what the service wants.

    Like I said previously you can be returned to parent trade at any time.
    In my day your attitude came into it too. You have to be able to accept criticism, you will get that a lot after flights, even after training. Every flight has a debrief, you have an input too, it's not you that goes under the spotlight. An inability to accept criticism could have an adverse effect.

    However, as I said in a previous post, if/when you are successful, the real world aircrewman is the most fantastic job going.

    Pilots = Taxi drivers. Back seaters do all the work. :lol:

    If you have any questions and don't want to appear a dawk on the boards - PM me, I am sad enough to be on here most days.
     
  7. I'm pretty certain that the "Crewies" can be killicks, the RM guys on the Junglies are mostly Corporals at start of the course.

    Bloody back seat drivers... :D :D :D
     
  8. killicks, ?? Have no idea what this means :) as i've not actually strated basic yet :)
     
  9. Seanie

    A killick is a Leading Hand. Comes from a Gaelic word for Anchor.
     
  10. Thank you :)
     
  11. If you had read my post you will see I said you had to be passed for killick to apply. Because you get your hook or confirmed in the rate at the end of training. (In my day)! :wink:
     
  12. b] Because you get your hook or confirmed in the rate at the end of training. (In my day)! :wink:[/quote]

    That's right, you get your hook at the end of OCP. That's the very end of all your training. So you have to join up, do basic, do your trade training, do some sea time, do your task books, pass for killick. Then you can apply for the acmn branch (which could get turned down), get the manning clearance, pass grading, pass medical, pass survival, pass BAC, pass ACP, pass OCP............and then you will be a killick! If your very quick and lucky you could be a crewie in about 5-6 years after joining up.

    Now take a step towards the crabs approach. Join up, do basic, get promoted to SGT (yes a PO) and then go straight into ground school and flying training. The perks are there straight from the beginning.

    Now we all know that the Navy approach produces a better product (in some cases) but lets be honest, if you have the aptitude and the ability, do yourself a favour and join the bloody crabs. And believe me, that is painful to say!
     
  13. And I thought that a killick was a type of anchor as well :D
     
  14. That's right, you get your hook at the end of OCP. That's the very end of all your training. So you have to join up, do basic, do your trade training, do some sea time, do your task books, pass for killick. Then you can apply for the acmn branch (which could get turned down), get the manning clearance, pass grading, pass medical, pass survival, pass BAC, pass ACP, pass OCP............and then you will be a killick! If your very quick and lucky you could be a crewie in about 5-6 years after joining up.

    Now take a step towards the crabs approach. Join up, do basic, get promoted to SGT (yes a PO) and then go straight into ground school and flying training. The perks are there straight from the beginning.

    Now we all know that the Navy approach produces a better product (in some cases) but lets be honest, if you have the aptitude and the ability, do yourself a favour and join the bloody crabs. And believe me, that is painful to say![/quote]


    Very true.

    I hadn't even heard of aircrewmen before I got to my first squadron as a aircraft mechanic. I was too busy getting qualified in my current trade before I even started asking about crewies.

    I suppose if your passion is flying then the crab route would be quicker. I'm not going to say better just quicker. And a senior rank/rate to boot. Worth a moments thought!

    But a crab, achhhh spit!!!! :? :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  15. I'm a Pinger Crewie and still doing it and have done for 12 years. If you need more help let me know!! = If you wait for direct entry you'll be waiting ages!! however if you join as something else you may not get manning clearance to go crewman?? I wont lie either - it is a hard course and its 2 years of hard slog to finally get through. I do believe the benefits of crewman life out weigh fish head life massively
     
  16. Nice username. Almost as original as mine!!!!! :lol: :lol: You ACA?
     

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