AIB - Q101 Form

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by SDMackie, Jul 12, 2011.

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  1. Hey guys.

    Firstly i'd just like to say that these forums are a gold mine of information. I've been lurking around for a while now reading up on AIB hints, tips and advice and they're invaluable, particularly now that my AIB is in sight.

    However, I have been unable to find an answer to the question i'm about to ask.

    The AIB is now requiring Q101 forms to be submitted by email, and whilst I can see the logic in this I am unsure as to how much detail I should go into. I realise that this is what they base the interview on, but I am mindful of being too detailed in my examples of teamwork and leadership etc. Is it better to include enough information for them to base questions on, but leave enough out so that you have little nuggets of information to include?

    I realise this might be a silly question, so I thank you for your responses!

    Yours Aye,

  2. Tell them nothing, let them work for the information.

    Plus I have no idea what your on about but someone who's just done AIB may have a sensible answer.

    edited to add welcome to the site BTW :-D
  3. Hi Scott,

    Personally, I just put as much information as I possibly could. I had to hand-write mine and send it in as I didn't have the appropriate software on my computer to type my responses into each section, so wrote in very small letters :p

    When it came to the interview, the questions asked didn't reflect specifically on what I had written. It was more, "Please describe a time when you set yourself a challenge. How did you overcome it?". In otherwords, the questions asked in person were very similar to the questions asked on my Q101. So my answers pretty much fell back on what I had already put in, plus a little bit more detail in some cases.

    I would say just put as much as you can, because there will inevitably be more detail that you can add in person.

    Also, I may have passed my AIB despite my score on interview, rather than because of it. So wait for a second opinion before taking any action.

    P.s. Welcome to RR!
  4. Magda

    Magda War Hero Book Reviewer

    Give as much information as you can, is what I'd say. Some who have been for their AIB said their q101 wasn't referred to that much in the interview - mine was! By all three members of the Board. So it is worth making sure you write down good but HONEST answers to the questions and be as specific as you can.

    They will ask you some reasonably easy questions in the interview (Have you ever witnessed racism? Why do you want to join?), and some difficult ones. I was asked - politely! - by the Commander: "So you studied *insert degree here* at University. Why do you want to be a Logistics Officer? They're not really linked, are they?" Be prepared to have your carefully thought through and cultivated answers in the q101 ripped asunder =-)

    That aside, have fun ;-)

    (It's not that bad. My big tip is BE HONEST. They can sense a liar a mile off.)
  5. Just give them your full name and location as you've done on here and then let them search Facebook.
    Personal security, a concept unknown to numpties.:slow:
  6. Hey.

    Thanks for the responses guys! I suppose it was much easier back before you were to email the 101s in due to the fact you were limited in space! But thanks for your responses!

    And NZ_Bootneck - point taken! =P
  7. I was pretty detailed in my Q101 but mostly used different examples in my interview, it lets you get an extra example in for things if you do have multiple examples. Obviously you can give the Q101 answer again as well, and they'll probe further if they want to on it. But you don't have to repeat verbatim the answer of the form.

    As for length I filled some of the boxes with typed text, the answers you give in the Q101 can be more detailed than you'll probably get an opportunity to give in interview. They are pretty quick at cutting you off if they've heard enough / want to move on, which can be annoying if you've not gotten to the good bit of your example!
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