AIB Prep - What are the keys to success?

#1
Hi all,
I am due to attend my first AIB within the next two months and would appreciate if any current serving/recent AIB candidates could share their experiences and prep tips with me. I know there are many posts like this but I am hoping for some up to date information surrounding the AIB and to be able to gauge the level of prep I must reach before I attempt it. I understand that some people may have a problem with me asking this question as many have to undertake their AIB with only the help provided by their AFCO, however I'd appreciate anything that is provided as I value the knowledge that comes with the experiences I have yet had chance to take. Some helpful information follows:
Position applied for: Aircrew Officer Pilot
Current stage of process: Recieved AIB date, passed FAT

Thanks in advance!
 
#2
The AIB is a difficult thing to prep for. Having gone through and passed as an in-service candidate in 2009 and gone back as an observer in 2015 when two of my guys were due to attend, I think it’s very much a test of innate ability on the whole. Though there are things you can do to help better display your ability.

Fitness is an easy win, make sure you can smash the RNFT. You can practice psychometric testing so that you get faster, and therefore can answer more questions in the time given and get a higher mark, but if you struggle with them you’ll find it hard to get better. Not impossible, but still hard.

You can practice writing clear & concise instructions and ideas. Candidates no longer write an essay, but instead are asked to present their thoughts on the planning exercise in an informal written format.

The planning exercise itself is really difficult to prep for without actually doing one so I wouldn’t sweat that, just deal with it on the day.

The PLT’s are similar. My advice there is LISTEN to what you’re told.

The impression that I came away with on after sitting on a board as an observer and witnessing the marks being allocated was that the interview itself remains of paramount importance. I saw a candidate who up to that point had been on for a pass, if not a spectacular one, lose it there. I also saw another who to my mind was a sure fire failure go in and blow the board members away in the interview. They’ll want to know your motivation for joining. They’ll look for examples of when you’ve succeeded in something, and more importantly when you failed and how you dealt with it. When were you part of a team, when have you lead a team? The key is honesty. They will know if you’re giving rehearsed, false answers. By all means practice, but try and sound natural. And of course, as with any interview, don’t slouch and maintain eye contact with the person you’re talking to.

And one piece of advice I was given that I think stood me well was; remember it’s a cumalative score. You can screw up on one section and make it up in another. If you think you did screw up, forget it, it’s too late to change it. Start each new test as if it’s the first and throw yourself into it wholeheartedly.

Good luck.
 
#3
The best advice I can suggest is just be natural. I know it sounds simple but that really is a big part of it. There is space in the service for both extroverted and more introverted Officers.

Remember that during the tasks that you sit during the board the way in which you conduct yourself during the assessments carries far more weight than whether you are actually able to complete them. In the PLT for instance focus on being a clear communicator and giving out plenty of encouragement rather than getting yourself too stressed on whether your plan is all that effective or not.

Also remember that your fellow candidates are not your competitors, they are your teammates. All of you within your syndicate can be forwarded for selection at Dartmouth, so do your best to gel and get on with them. This will make your time at the board so much more pleasant.

If you don't mind me asking, when are you due to sit your AIB? I am also going for Aircrew Officer Pilot and am due to sit my AIB next month, would be interesting to see if we're due to sit the same board!

All the best!
 
#5
Sorry for the late reply, had a busy few weeks since I posted this. I appreciate the long and in depth reply, it’s helped me realise that my interview prep is a key area that can be refined beforehand whereas the others are very much tests of innate ability. Thank you so much, I’ll be sure to let you know how it goes!
The AIB is a difficult thing to prep for. Having gone through and passed as an in-service candidate in 2009 and gone back as an observer in 2015 when two of my guys were due to attend, I think it’s very much a test of innate ability on the whole. Though there are things you can do to help better display your ability.

Fitness is an easy win, make sure you can smash the RNFT. You can practice psychometric testing so that you get faster, and therefore can answer more questions in the time given and get a higher mark, but if you struggle with them you’ll find it hard to get better. Not impossible, but still hard.

You can practice writing clear & concise instructions and ideas. Candidates no longer write an essay, but instead are asked to present their thoughts on the planning exercise in an informal written format.

The planning exercise itself is really difficult to prep for without actually doing one so I wouldn’t sweat that, just deal with it on the day.

The PLT’s are similar. My advice there is LISTEN to what you’re told.

The impression that I came away with on after sitting on a board as an observer and witnessing the marks being allocated was that the interview itself remains of paramount importance. I saw a candidate who up to that point had been on for a pass, if not a spectacular one, lose it there. I also saw another who to my mind was a sure fire failure go in and blow the board members away in the interview. They’ll want to know your motivation for joining. They’ll look for examples of when you’ve succeeded in something, and more importantly when you failed and how you dealt with it. When were you part of a team, when have you lead a team? The key is honesty. They will know if you’re giving rehearsed, false answers. By all means practice, but try and sound natural. And of course, as with any interview, don’t slouch and maintain eye contact with the person you’re talking to.

And one piece of advice I was given that I think stood me well was; remember it’s a cumalative score. You can screw up on one section and make it up in another. If you think you did screw up, forget it, it’s too late to change it. Start each new test as if it’s the first and throw yourself into it wholeheartedly.

Good luck.
 

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