After initial officer training

MenInSlacks

Midshipman
Hello all,

The thing that killed the cat is bugging me again so I thought I'd post about it here.

While it'll be a while for me (hoping all goes to plan), I was just curious as to what happens to RNR officers once they've completed the initial training element? Only been told very vaguely and having trouble finding anything on the new RN site.

I'm hoping to attend the AOP 2017 and then go on to specialise as a warfare officer.

Cheers for any help,

MenInSlacks
 

CmdKeen

Lantern Swinger
If you're doing AOP 17 then it won't be that long until you're out of initial training - the expectation is you'll have passed Fleet Board within a year.

You join a specialisation, essentially choosing a specific role, each has a presentation of Defence Connect and during AOP you may get visits and talks about them, and I'm sure the reserve staff will try and get some recruiting in. Factors to consider include when their major training opportunities occur and how frequently and any bottlenecks in the process, whether you want a sea going role or not, whether you like the idea of being on a battle staff, and mobilisation opportunities, frequency and how long it takes to be potentially mobilised. Whilst it is possible to switch specialisations this is definitely an important decision to make - once you're a midshipman speak to the officers at your unit to find out the pros and cons of each, and perhaps try to make an acquaint weekend or two. A visit to a Triton Warrior weekend is an opportunity to meet with several specialisations.

At the same time you undertake Phase 2 training - the Junior Officer's Leadership Course (JOLC1) and the Divisional Officer's Course (DO) - you have to do these before undertaking anything more than weekend training with your specialisation. There are RNR versions of both courses - which DO's course you do probably doesn't really matter. I would massively recommend the RNR version of JOLC1, it is one of the best courses I've ever attended and the time spent on how to be a junior officer in unit is invaluable and not something you'll get with the RN course.

Phase 3 is getting stuck into becoming minimally useful in your specialisation, usually a 2 week training course followed by participating in a major exercise like Joint Warrior. This is the moment you'll suddenly realise it is all very real, that you are a commissioned officer being entrusted with a modicum of responsibility and interacting with regulars from the RN and NATO forces - hopefully you'll thrive.

There is also unit life which varies massively by unit and the size of their wardroom. Units with fewer officers tend to entrust significant responsibility on junior officers, especially upper yardies or those with a bit more life experience. You'll start picking up unit jobs, being responsible for the development of ratings and being pinged to organise various things. Do learn to manage your commitment, don't assume that just because 24 days is bounty that we magically plan to only ever give you 24 days worth of work - your specialisation and unit will both quite happily give you more than 24 days of stuff to do!



Your unit will have a YOTO (Young Officer Training Officer) whose job is to get you post AOP through all the above.
 

MenInSlacks

Midshipman
Thank you for your incredibly helpful reply! :)

With the JOCI1 and DO courses are these across several weekends or across weeks or such? Because if possible I would prefer to do the course all at once so it's not a stop start process.

Also I definitely intend to go far above the minimum time commitment whenever I can! :) That's if they can put up with me ;)
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
If you're doing AOP 17 then it won't be that long until you're out of initial training - the expectation is you'll have passed Fleet Board within a year.

You join a specialisation, essentially choosing a specific role, each has a presentation of Defence Connect and during AOP you may get visits and talks about them, and I'm sure the reserve staff will try and get some recruiting in. Factors to consider include when their major training opportunities occur and how frequently and any bottlenecks in the process, whether you want a sea going role or not, whether you like the idea of being on a battle staff, and mobilisation opportunities, frequency and how long it takes to be potentially mobilised. Whilst it is possible to switch specialisations this is definitely an important decision to make - once you're a midshipman speak to the officers at your unit to find out the pros and cons of each, and perhaps try to make an acquaint weekend or two. A visit to a Triton Warrior weekend is an opportunity to meet with several specialisations.

At the same time you undertake Phase 2 training - the Junior Officer's Leadership Course (JOLC1) and the Divisional Officer's Course (DO) - you have to do these before undertaking anything more than weekend training with your specialisation. There are RNR versions of both courses - which DO's course you do probably doesn't really matter. I would massively recommend the RNR version of JOLC1, it is one of the best courses I've ever attended and the time spent on how to be a junior officer in unit is invaluable and not something you'll get with the RN course.

Phase 3 is getting stuck into becoming minimally useful in your specialisation, usually a 2 week training course followed by participating in a major exercise like Joint Warrior. This is the moment you'll suddenly realise it is all very real, that you are a commissioned officer being entrusted with a modicum of responsibility and interacting with regulars from the RN and NATO forces - hopefully you'll thrive.

There is also unit life which varies massively by unit and the size of their wardroom. Units with fewer officers tend to entrust significant responsibility on junior officers, especially upper yardies or those with a bit more life experience. You'll start picking up unit jobs, being responsible for the development of ratings and being pinged to organise various things. Do learn to manage your commitment, don't assume that just because 24 days is bounty that we magically plan to only ever give you 24 days worth of work - your specialisation and unit will both quite happily give you more than 24 days of stuff to do!



Your unit will have a YOTO (Young Officer Training Officer) whose job is to get you post AOP through all the above.
Excellent - I've been trying to find out precisely this. Thank you!

I wonder if there's any chance we can get this on the RN website? Appreciate that the RNR Officer pipeline is pretty much being established as we speak, but information internally as well as from the applicants perspective is scant. Truth is, we're providing more accurate info unofficially than is available through official sources ;)
 

CmdKeen

Lantern Swinger
Thank you for your incredibly helpful reply! :)

With the JOCI1 and DO courses are these across several weekends or across weeks or such? Because if possible I would prefer to do the course all at once so it's not a stop start process.

Also I definitely intend to go far above the minimum time commitment whenever I can! :) That's if they can put up with me ;)
The RNR DO's course is a Sat to Friday condensed version of the RN 2 week course. There are a few RNR specific bits tacked on so it is worth doing.

The RN JOLC1 is a week long course, the RNR one is two weekends a month apart where you have to attend both parts - it definitely isn't stop start.

Ninja - I'll prod our recruiting officer to ask re the RN website. The official version of this should be available in CMRTMs and the Phase 1 pipeline is detailed in the INT(O) task book - both are available on Defence Connect and presumably DII somewhere.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top