AET's

#1
Good morning guys/girls and whatever else you want to be called nowadays in this gender neutral world we live in.

Are there any AET's that use this forum?

Wondered if they wouldn't mind answering a few questions.
 
#3
Yes

There are some around here.
Well here are a few questions I'd love to ask.

What sort of tasks do you complete on a day to day basis?
Do you get a choice of which aircraft you wish to work on?
How much do you actually travel?
What is the pay like? When not at sea and when at sea.
What is the tea like onboard?
 

redmonkey

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
#4
You see aircraft in and out of the flight line, carry out servicing before and after flight, help fixing any snags that might crop up and carry out routine servicing.

You do get the chance to choose which aircraft type you want to work on although the requirements of the RN may upset your plan.
The travel side of things can vary depending on which aircraft type or ship you are attached to and what trips are coming up. You may be lucky and get to travel around the world on a carrier at some stage or you might spend time going from Norway to Jordan and places in between. Have a look on Navy news as they sometimes list where squadrons are or what they have been upto.

Your pay is as listed in some of the material from the AFCO or you can find it on line with a quick search.
At sea you get a bonus which is dependent on how many days separation you have (call them sea days but can be counted from else where if you deploy on land )

I have milk and one sugar in my tea thank you.
 
#5
I didn't leave all that long ago so I'll also give you a few answers:

What sort of tasks do you complete on a day to day basis?

- Servicing, **** loads of servicing. This mainly involves checking and replenishing fluids, cleaning windows, pumping up tires, cleaning up after the booties who've dragged half of Salisbury plains into the cab and generally making the helicopter look presentable so if the AEO accidentally finds himself in the hangar he has slightly less to complain about.

- Aircraft moves, which is when a chockhead attempts to tow the aircraft out of the hangar and you have to make sure he doesn't wang a blade on the hangar door. It also includes carrying chocks so that if the aircraft has to be stopped quickly you can chuck them under the wheels.

- Servicing.

- Maintenance/repair tasks. If maintenance is due or something has gone wrong with the aircraft then you have to fix it. Normally a Leading Hand takes charge of the job and a couple of lads will be on the job doing the leg work in the way of taking panels off to get access to components, removing/replacing components, wirelocking, wirelocking it again because the first time wasn't good enough, watching the leading hand wirelock it because you are a useless bastard.

- Marshalling. Which is standing out in front of the aircraft giving directions to the pilot as they start up/taxi off/taxi in/shut down. Note: Pilots normally just do their own thing anyway.

- More servicing.

Do you get a choice of which aircraft you wish to work on?

- Yes and no. You express your preference in Phase 2 training however this is purely a preference and the needs of the service come first. If when you get your drafts in Phase 2 you aren't happy with your draft and you can find an oppo who wants to swap, then you can normally swap with no issues.

How much do you actually travel?

- Depends on you aircraft type and it's also luck of the draw. Some lads end up on 6-9 monthers at sea. Some lads haven't been on a ship since the Gosport ferry.

What is the pay like? When not at sea and when at sea.

-Okay. Okayer. You're not gonna be a millionaire as an AET but if you aren't completely reckless with your money you can save a decent bit.

What is the tea like onboard?

- Cups of? Fine. To eat? Not bad. It's the scran that is served ashore that you have to worry about. Utter shite, so learn to cook for yourself.

Any other questions, ask away.
 
#6
I didn't leave all that long ago so I'll also give you a few answers:

What sort of tasks do you complete on a day to day basis?

- Servicing, **** loads of servicing. This mainly involves checking and replenishing fluids, cleaning windows, pumping up tires, cleaning up after the booties who've dragged half of Salisbury plains into the cab and generally making the helicopter look presentable so if the AEO accidentally finds himself in the hangar he has slightly less to complain about.

- Aircraft moves, which is when a chockhead attempts to tow the aircraft out of the hangar and you have to make sure he doesn't wang a blade on the hangar door. It also includes carrying chocks so that if the aircraft has to be stopped quickly you can chuck them under the wheels.

- Servicing.

- Maintenance/repair tasks. If maintenance is due or something has gone wrong with the aircraft then you have to fix it. Normally a Leading Hand takes charge of the job and a couple of lads will be on the job doing the leg work in the way of taking panels off to get access to components, removing/replacing components, wirelocking, wirelocking it again because the first time wasn't good enough, watching the leading hand wirelock it because you are a useless bastard.

- Marshalling. Which is standing out in front of the aircraft giving directions to the pilot as they start up/taxi off/taxi in/shut down. Note: Pilots normally just do their own thing anyway.

- More servicing.

Do you get a choice of which aircraft you wish to work on?

- Yes and no. You express your preference in Phase 2 training however this is purely a preference and the needs of the service come first. If when you get your drafts in Phase 2 you aren't happy with your draft and you can find an oppo who wants to swap, then you can normally swap with no issues.

How much do you actually travel?

- Depends on you aircraft type and it's also luck of the draw. Some lads end up on 6-9 monthers at sea. Some lads haven't been on a ship since the Gosport ferry.

What is the pay like? When not at sea and when at sea.

-Okay. Okayer. You're not gonna be a millionaire as an AET but if you aren't completely reckless with your money you can save a decent bit.

What is the tea like onboard?

- Cups of? Fine. To eat? Not bad. It's the scran that is served ashore that you have to worry about. Utter shite, so learn to cook for yourself.

Any other questions, ask away.
Thanks for taking the time to write such a detailed answer. Legend.

I'm sure I may have more questions to ask in the future.
 

redmonkey

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
#9
Your work may also depend on you. If you are keen and eager to learn you will be involved in the more interesting jobs.
If you try and sit in the crew room all the time and do as little as possible you will find yourself doing the gash jobs

You do get what you put in to the job.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#11
Personal experience?
Inasmuch as I've processed individuals joining the Navy in a gender different to that stated on their original birth certificate and worked with other service personnel who now have different gender to that in which they originally joined.

The rights and wrongs or psychiatric condition and medical suitability of those individuals is fortunately decided by those supposedly qualified to make that decision, paid far, far more than me :)

Equally, I'm chuffed the topic arose in a WAFU thread...
 

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