Advice

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Stormus, Jul 2, 2008.

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  1. Hi all,im hoping to join the Royal Marines in January and im looking for some advice please,

    OK I had EIA when i was about 13ish and never had a really bad attack just some nights couldnt breathe comfortably and got out of breath quickly when i was running so had some inhalers for a while gradually coming off them and im four years clear in december.Stopped taking my inhalers when i was about 15-16 but then started again to help me with my gym work dont no why i guess it was more of a mental thing.went to the doctors 2 years ago and he said id have to wait another two years but was quite surprised to see my lung cap was 650 now its about 700 and ive been training for the last 16 mths for the RM's and have about 6mths left.im 23 now 5ft 8 weigh about 14st by jan that will be 12.5-13st and can do 3 miles in about 21.5 mins and sit up,press up tests at max with about 9 pull ups.the last week or so ive noticed my breathing has been a bit flemy and a cough now and again helps,about the same time i started using my red powerbreathe again and the pollen count is quite high round here this time of year and i do have mild hayfever which can block up my nose a little,also when i start to run or train on the crosstrainer sometimes my breathing can struggle and take 1-2 miles to settle then it feels like i can breathe better then ever and after a run my lung cap always seems alittle higher than before,sprinting can get me out of breath quite quickly but i wonder if im not warming up properly or could it have something to do with hayfever then after a while exercising my lungs just clear it out?
    also i did smoke now and again at the weekends down the pub but stopped completely on new years eve and ive given up beer aswell.

    any advice would be grately appreciated
     
  2. Advice: around the letters on your keyboard there are little dots and dashes, they're called punctuation. Punctuation makes reading large blocks of text easier, please use it more often.
     
  3. Hi all,im hoping to join the Royal Marines in January and im looking for some advice please,

    OK,I had EIA when I was about 13'ish and never had a really bad attack just some nights could'nt breathe comfortably,got out of breath quickly when i was running so had some inhalers for a while gradually coming off them and im four years clear in December.Stopped taking my inhalers when I was about 15-16 but then started again to help me with my gym work,don't no why I guess it was more of a mental thing.Went to the doctors 2 years ago and he said i'd have to wait another two years but was quite surprised to see my lung cap was 650,now it's about 700 and i've been training for the last 16 mths for the RM's and have about 6mths left.
    I'm 23 now,5ft 8,weigh about 14st,by jan that will be 12.5-13st and can do 3 miles in about 21.5 mins and sit up,press up tests at max with about 9 pull ups.
    The last week or so i've noticed my breathing has been a bit flemy and a cough now and again helps,about the same time I started using my red powerbreathe again and the pollen count is quite high round here this time of year.I do have mild hayfever which can block up my nose a little,also when i start to run or train on the crosstrainer sometimes my breathing can struggle and take 1-2 miles to settle then it feels like I can breathe better then ever,after a run my lung cap always seems alittle higher than before,sprinting can get me out of breath quite quickly but I wonder if im not warming up properly or could it have something to do with hayfever then after a while exercising my lungs just clear it out?
    Also I did smoke now and again at the weekends down the pub but stopped completely on new years eve and i've given up beer aswell.

    Any advice would be grately appreciated
     
  4. Dont smoke.

    Dont drink.

    Can breathe.

    Have you considered how miserable you are?
     
  5. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    "Angrydoc" may have more to say on the issue and is best placed to advise, but there has been a huge increase of candidates such as yourself leading to a backlog of individuals waiting for a specialiast medical to assess their suitability for service.

    In the vast majority of cases, it is quite simply stated that you need to be 4 years clear of the symptoms or treatment for asthma. End of.

    For those considered borderline by the Medical Examiner (not the individual), a variation in the assessment of wheezing diatheses in potential entrants to the RN/RM will now be followed where determined by the Medical Examiner at your AFCO.

    The assessment of potential recruits requiring further investigation is now to include a respiratory questionnaire completed by their GP and a 4 week peak flow diary. Cases with a diurnal variation less than a set level are generally considered fit for entry and those with a variation greater than the set level considered unfit. Borderline cases or where concerns are raised from the clinical assessment, the respiratory questionnaire or the peak flow diary are to be referred to for further consideration via a specialist medical.

    Ultimately your Medical Examiner will advise you whether you fulfil the criteria to be further assessed or whether you are to be considered fit or unfit for service.

    Hope that helps & good luck.
     
  6. LOL,

    Its just I want my fitness to be as high as possible for when I join hopefully to give me the best chance of completing the training.I believe it to be a great career,very rewarding and a chance to see the world and make some great friends.It will be worth it.
     
  7. I think sometimes it is too easy to diagnose a breathing problem as asthma, give the kid an inhaler and it goes away.

    I had what was diagnosed as an asthma attack before I joined (5 years) and at the medical I had to relate the whole thing to the quack who pronounced that it had been misdiagnosed so no problem
     
  8. Thx for the advice
     
  9. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    I categorically agree.

    The problem from a GP's perspective is that anyone suffering breathing difficulties understandably seeks a rapid cure. The cause could be a whole range of ailments, but the quick-acting treatment is the one associated with asthma.

    If a GP doesn't give one and the condition deteriorates, then he/she would be had-up for gross misconduct at least. The patient then carries their "comfort blanket" just in case, renewing it routinely.

    Understandably perhaps, all parties must tread with extreme care as tragically, people can and do die of this condition, hence the very cautious service approach.
     
  10. Without doubt real asthma is a potentially very serious condition, and some versions are seriously affected by stress so very dangerous if the job naturally has a heavy stress element. The problem is to ensure that the wheat and chaff are effectively separated, and considering the problems there are in recruiting at least for some aspects of the services using simple tick box assessment seems wasteful
     

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