Advice Please!

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by ShaunSheep18, Jul 10, 2012.

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  1. Hi All, around 2 and a half years ago I applied for the Royal Navy and I failed the medical due to being colour-blind. However over the past year I applied for the Army and I passed selection and everything even though Im partially colour-blind. However, I feel that the Royal Navy would be more for me and im thinking of applying again, is there a chance that this time it wont hinder my application, as there are a vast range of jobs surely there must be a job that I can do? Any help/advice welcome.


    Thanks

    Shaun
     
  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    There are different grades of colour perception.

    Depending on the recruiting test score & the medical standards for entry in the chosen branch, there are a range of jobs available (usually RM, RN Logistics or some RN Engineering specialisations) which can accept a lower standard. The lowest acceptable grade for entry is Colour Perception grade 4 (CP4) and the various colour perception tests are listed here, on the RM Forum:Eyesight - the facts about mince pies

    Those graded CP5 are unfortunately ineligible for Naval Service.
     
  3. Cheers for the help! its been odd as when I went for Naval medical and did the eye test, they graded me a CP5 :( however the Army graded me level 4. so im slightly confused!

    Thanks
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    To be graded CP5 for the Naval Service an applicant would need to either fail to correctly identify different coloured stationery tabs or fail to correctly match and connect a set number of different coloured wires within a defined timescale.

    Colour perception rarely changes, but the standard of the person conducting the tests may vary. If in doubt, speak to your RN AFCO staff to enquire whether a re-test is possible.
     

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