Abbreviations!

#1
Hello,

I'm currently ploughing my task book, and have some questions on abbreviations that I've never heard of wondered if anyone out there could help us out! I've listed them below.

CTT
CACREX
MMSFEX
SSD
SCXA
WPM
ORM
ORS
WASB
HTAS
DFA
DCO

Cheers Shippers!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#3
Welcome.

If you are at Collingwood & still in training then you would normally start your taskbook when you get your first ship.

One can only assume you have yet to set foot on a ship yet as many of those abbreviations would be painfully apparent. Not much point telling you what they stand for if you don't know what they actually mean in the context of your branch and your position within the watch and station bill. Keen is good, but it's best to walk before you run.

Good luck.
 
#4
SCXA = South Coast exercise area
ORM = Ops Room Manager
ORD = Ops Room Supervisor
HTAS = Hands to Harbour Stations
DCO = Damage Control Officer
I'm guessing you're a dabber?
 
#7
Hello,

I'm currently ploughing my task book, and have some questions on abbreviations that I've never heard of wondered if anyone out there could help us out! I've listed them below.

CTT - Command Team Training.
CACREX - Doesn'tstand for anything, but it is an engineering check of your above water sensors and comms.
MMSFEX - Main Machinery Space Fire Exercise.
SSD - Special Sea Dutymen.
SCXA - South Coast Exercise Areas.
WPM - Weekly Planning Meeting.
ORM - Ops Room Manager.
ORS - Ops Room Supervisor.
WASB - Watch and Station Bill.
HTAS - Hands to Action Stations.
DFA - Duty First Aider.
DCO - Duty Commanding Officer/Damage Control Officer. (Depends on the context).

Cheers Shippers!
Answers in the quote.
 
#8
Welcome.

If you are at Collingwood & still in training then you would normally start your taskbook when you get your first ship.

One can only assume you have yet to set foot on a ship yet as many of those abbreviations would be painfully apparent. Not much point telling you what they stand for if you don't know what they actually mean in the context of your branch and your position within the watch and station bill. Keen is good, but it's best to walk before you run.

Good luck.
Being an old fart, what is a task book.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#9
I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the most well known & impossibly long Naval abbreviation, known to all:

HOOTROTDCOTUDCASDAHACBRNS3CYHTHSSSDCU.
 

redmonkey

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
#13
I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the most well known & impossibly long Naval abbreviation, known to all:

HOOTROTDCOTUDCASDAHACBRNS3CYHTHSSSDCU.
I've only ever seen that with HTHS at the start instead of near the end.

Sent from my HTC Desire using Navy Net - Rum Ration mobile app
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#17
I've only ever seen that with HTHS at the start instead of near the end.
If you've only served on the one ship, this is entirely feasible as the sequence, content and timings can be staggered rather than implemented in one instance.

I've seen the sequence varied many times with SSDs piped well after HTHS and twitchy Commanding Officers pipe 3Y after spotting a ship on the radar plot.

Best of all are ships closing-up to Action Stations or shifting into AWD unnecessarily. I well remember wearing full AWD on Armilla for a RAS and watching the RFA crew wearing shorts & teeshirts. 12 hours later all hell broke loose when the US shot down a civilian airliner.

On the other hand - Sheffield in 1982 was in defence watches with half the ships company in bed during in "relaxed" 2Y during the "working day" when a missile slammed into it.
 
#18
HTHS and SSDs are an interesting mix.

Technically, "Harbour Stations" means the dabbers getting the ropes and wires ready to come alongside. If this is a long job, then it could be easily done before "Special Sea Dutymen". On the other hand, Specials is required when you're placing the ship in navigationally constrained or dangerous waters, typically meaning you need to be ready for a collision or grounding quite quickly, hence the people ready and in place for a machy breakdown or immediate slip of the anchor: a long pilotage might mean you need those people well before you're going to require ropes and wires handled.

<swings lamp> The pilotage into Bermuda takes forever (you go 2/3rds of the way around the island dodging reefs), but the coming alongside is a piece of piss. Hence, SSDs for about 4 hours and Harbour Stations for all of 30 minutes.

And now I'll stop doing my Ops/Mate of the Upper Deck bit.....
 

redmonkey

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
#19
Ninja, guess that carriers all use the same routine. I have a few years on them. RFAs don't seem to bother and I cannot remember what the Ocean does.

Sent from my HTC Desire using Navy Net - Rum Ration mobile app
 

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