A Three Badges View of 21st Century

Geoff_Wessex

Lantern Swinger
Thanks for that, Silverfox - much appreciated. CLX is presumably 'son of DMPS', and that was certainly the way the wind was blowing when I left 15 years back. It all made good sense - though we were hard pressed to keep our Part of Ship clean even back then, so with, presumably, a reduced complement all round in the Warfare Branch, I expect your job as XO meant getting blood from a stone.

Ah NOSTALGIA - it's a thing of the past
 

creakin

Badgeman
to silverfox and geoff wessex

It is interesting reading your last two threads. However I left in 92 as a killick sparker of 15 yrs, and some of these comms acronyms I have never heard of even when I was serving. I can imagine technology moves on very quickly, but what happens when it all falls over, back to a morse broadcast(if they still teach morse that is!)

Do they still learn the morse code?
 

Geoff_Wessex

Lantern Swinger
creakin said:
to silverfox and geoff wessex

Do they still learn the morse code?

Can't remember when they stopped training it, but Morse had just about disappeared from all naval circuits except some of the old Commonwealth Ship Shore stations (like Halifax, and then only on the answering freq) by about 1988. I'm fairly sure they weren't training it by 1990, but I could be wrong.

I know where you're coming from about keeping Morse as an option - loss of satellites, jamming etc - but we're (sorry. they) about as far removed from being Morse operators as the seamen are at hoisting sails. Mind you, did you know that a CRS (aka CPOTel, or CPO Comms[gawd]) is a "Master Seaman" in the Canadian Navy?
 

sidon55

Lantern Swinger
It is amazing how quickly modernization of equipment onboard has come. I left in '59 and having been aboard some of the modern ships it is eye opening. The crews of my time could never imagine these changes and now the crews are more technitians than sailors. Win't ne long before you will have to have a Uni degree just to tie up the ship
 
D

Deleted 493

Guest
sidon55 said:
It is amazing how quickly modernization of equipment onboard has come. I left in '59 and having been aboard some of the modern ships it is eye opening. The crews of my time could never imagine these changes and now the crews are more technitians than sailors. Win't ne long before you will have to have a Uni degree just to tie up the ship

Many a true word said in jest, sidon55. The new Engineering Technician branch (ET) is designed to rear-load the skills up to degree level to aid training and retention. The changing pace of technology in warfare is the main driver for this. These days we need fast moving diagnosticians and the skill-sets behind them to enable a quick fix and return to service of weapons systems and engineering assets. As many of these are now processor-dependent (and sometimes very versatile for repairs), it's a case of requiring the old-style tiffs to shape up or ship out...the new breed are on their way through. There will always be step-changes in training and enabling sailors. Post war, we have had the missile age, gas turbines, laser/optical sights, computers, deisel-electric power and now we stand on another threshold with the AESP, or All Electric Ship Principle. Keeping matelots ahead of that is a big task.

Levers
 
Levers_Aligned said:
Many a true word said in jest, sidon55. The new Engineering Technician branch (ET) is designed to rear-load the skills up to degree level to aid training and retention. The changing pace of technology in warfare is the main driver for this. These days we need fast moving diagnosticians and the skill-sets behind them to enable a quick fix and return to service of weapons systems and engineering assets. As many of these are now processor-dependent (and sometimes very versatile for repairs), it's a case of requiring the old-style tiffs to shape up or ship out...the new breed are on their way through. There will always be step-changes in training and enabling sailors. Post war, we have had the missile age, gas turbines, laser/optical sights, computers, deisel-electric power and now we stand on another threshold with the AESP, or All Electric Ship Principle. Keeping matelots ahead of that is a big task.

Levers

As some one involved in new weapons system development I can assure you it will not get any easier. Some of te new ideas coming through now will make todays gear look just as pedestrian as the dear old Mk 8 torpedo.

Peter
 
Lasting as long is perhaps the difficult bit, tecnology moves on at quite horifying pace at times, but sometimes the technology des not allow you to move that far forward for some time so nothing much changes in the field. I know of equipment which has been in service for 30 years that is still supported because the cross over between cost of maintenance and cost of replacement has not yet happened.

As to reliability once the initial teething problems are solved most gear today is far more reliable than the stuff it replaced.

Peter
 

dunkers

War Hero
Remember the powers that be WANT you to believe that it's all PC, and anyway the PC stuff is all you hear about from the "outside". Still the same on the inside I hope, it's what i aspire to anyway :D
 

johne

War Hero
Nutty said:
THE DEMISE OF JACK TAR.

The traditional male sailor was not defined by his looks. He was defined by his attitude; his name was Jack Tar.He was a happy go lucky sort of a bloke; he took the good times with the bad. He didn't cry victimisation, bastardisation, discrimination or for his mum when things didn't go his way. He took responsibility for his own, sometimes, self-destructive actions.He loved a laugh at anything or anybody. Rank, gender, race, creed or behaviour, it didn't matter to Jack, he would take the piss out of anyone, including himself. If someone took it out of him he didn't get offended; it was a natural part of life. If he offended someone else, so be it. Free from many of the rules of polite society, Jack's manners were somewhat rough.His ability to swear was legendary. He would stand up for his mates. Jack was extravagant with his support to those he thought needed it. He may have been right or wrong, but that didn’t' t matter. NutyJack's mate was one of the luckiest people alive.Jack loved women. ThHe loved to chase them to the ends of the earth and sometimes he even caught one. (Less often than he would have you believe though) His tales of the chase and its conclusion win or lose, is the stuff of legends.Jack's favourite drink was beer, and he could drink it like a fish. His actions when inebriated would, on occasion, land him in trouble. But, he took it on the chin, did his punishment and then went and did it all again.Jack loved his job. He took an immense pride in what he did. His radar was always the best in the fleet. His engines always worked better than anyone else's. His eyes could spot a contact before anyone else’s and shoot at it first. It was a matter of personal pride. Jack was the consummate professional when he was at work and sober. He was a bit like a mischievous child. He had a gleam in his eye and a larger than life outlook.He was as rough as guts. You had to be pig headed and thick skinned to survive. He worked hard and played hard. His masters tut-tutted at some of his more exuberant expressions of joie de vivre, and the occasional bout of number 9’s or stoppage let him know where his limits were.The late 20th Century and on has seen the demise of Jack. The workplace no longer echoes with ribald comment and bawdy tales. Someone is sure to take offence. Where as, those stories of daring do and ingenuity in the face of adversity, usually whilst pissed, lack the audacity of the past. A wicked sense of humour is now a liability, rather than a necessity. Jack has been socially engineered out of existence. What was once normal is now offensive. Denting someone else’s over inflated opinion of their own self worth is now a crime.

And so a culture dies

Unless you serving Sprogs can tell us different?

Nutty
That was the best ever referance to Jack I have ever read. I Know its true.
 
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