A Three Badges View of 21st Century

watton

Midshipman
La jardin, wouldn`t be good old gardens? would it. There has many a fun filled Tuesday night been spent supping copious amounts of lager, chasing the local talant and hoping yuo are going to make it for turn too the next day. And of course there was grab a granny on thursday to look forward to.
 

buffer01

Lantern Swinger
Gardens! Pah! Do you remember Club 15 in Ilchester, the 393? Mother and daughter trapping teams. At least you could bring the totty onto camp by getting her to jump the ridiculously low fence at the end of 27/09. In fact, one of the soup dragons from the Colonel is still doing that, with the next generation. What a trooper, but Ging-grr birds do try harder!

I agree with Nutty though, young Jack is more worried about their looks than bagging n sh*gging. You look in the car parks of any shore base and you'll find that Jack has got a better car than the CO. They've got no money to go ashore after they've tried to insure their Scooby Doo (Insert any hair dressers car that pre-pubescant boys cream over).
Now, who can remeber Tarpaulin Musters in the spider blocks for enough for beers in the Mens bar and panty pad pizza's from the automat?
 

diesel

War Hero
Talking about automat's. does anyone remember ' Nasty Nash ' and the ' Shit in the Pie ' incident. Dolphin circa '77 ?
 

Geoff_Wessex

Lantern Swinger
diesel said:
Talking about automat's. does anyone remember ' Nasty Nash ' and the ' Shit in the Pie ' incident. Dolphin circa '77 ?

You must mean Jan Nash - RO and later a grocer who managed to blag a draft to Hong Kong. Jan - one of SM Command's finest - once left a neat deposit on the dais at HMS Mercury on a Thursday evening, i.e. night before Friday Divisons.

(Edited to add another)....

I was in the Automat at Faslane, late at night, 1971, chatting (burbling) to a Wren, who was feeling the worse for wear. She felt queasy and wanted me to take her to the heads, so I did - however, as I was also topped up (on Pernod, I seem to remember), I could only think of taking said lady to the only heads I knew - the mens one in the basement. Anyway, along come the Naval Patrol, spot two pairs of shoes in trap 3 and think the worst. To cut a long story short, I spent a night in cells and eventually got 28 days DQs (suspended - phew!)
 
D

Deleted 493

Guest
Nutty said:
THE DEMISE OF JACK TAR.

And so a culture dies

Unless you serving Sprogs can tell us different?

Nutty

I do disagree, Nutty. In almost thirty years of continuous service I have monitored change from without and within. Sure, today's Jack and Split are different creatures, but they have the same belief systems that the 'old navy' had. Yes, it may be modified. Yes, they listen to their iPods, don't like the music you liked and wear 'product' on their hair. From what I remember, that is what they used to call Brylcreem, isn't it? Everyone bangs on about 'pink and fluffy' these days without stopping to examine what the **** that implies. Regulations come and go...they stopped giving people the lash before we were all sailors, yet the Roll On The Rodney generation still broke the rules, went over the wall and returned for more. It's all about evolution. That is the human element. Change is another aspect, and that is a physical phenomenon, brought about by too much management swappage and great ideas club barbeques. But the human side of it, the core element of the sailor, his selfish, benevolent, loving, hating, fighting, ******* principles have nevere changed, and never will, no matter how much counselling, stress management, political correctness and other such dogshit the lords and masters can inject into the bloodstream.

I've heard it said that the navy died when the tot stopped. I've also heard that about many other milestones...the end of the Falklands, the Strategic Defence Review, Wrens At Sea, the victory of Duncan Lustig Prean and the legalisation of homosexuality in the forces. Quite simply it is bollocks. We remain matelots, everything mentioned above and proud of it. Time may change what we look like, but it doesn't change who we are.

Levers
 
Levers_Aligned said:
Nutty said:
THE DEMISE OF JACK TAR.

And so a culture dies

Unless you serving Sprogs can tell us different?

Nutty

I do disagree, Nutty. In almost thirty years of continuous service I have monitored change from without and within. Sure, today's Jack and Split are different creatures, but they have the same belief systems that the 'old navy' had. Yes, it may be modified. Yes, they listen to their iPods, don't like the music you liked and wear 'product' on their hair. From what I remember, that is what they used to call Brylcreem, isn't it? Everyone bangs on about 'pink and fluffy' these days without stopping to examine what the **** that implies. Regulations come and go...they stopped giving people the lash before we were all sailors, yet the Roll On The Rodney generation still broke the rules, went over the wall and returned for more. It's all about evolution. That is the human element. Change is another aspect, and that is a physical phenomenon, brought about by too much management swappage and great ideas club barbeques. But the human side of it, the core element of the sailor, his selfish, benevolent, loving, hating, fighting, ******* principles have nevere changed, and never will, no matter how much counselling, stress management, political correctness and other such dogshit the lords and masters can inject into the bloodstream.

I've heard it said that the navy died when the tot stopped. I've also heard that about many other milestones...the end of the Falklands, the Strategic Defence Review, Wrens At Sea, the victory of Duncan Lustig Prean and the legalisation of homosexuality in the forces. Quite simply it is bollocks. We remain matelots, everything mentioned above and proud of it. Time may change what we look like, but it doesn't change who we are.

Levers


Levers

I am not going to disagree with you. As I requested I wanted to hear how the modern Matelot saw himself and life. Us Cold War Warriors can only see from the outside and have to guess what is going on. As I first stated I heve seen two sides in my recent travels. Thanks for your positive imput

Nutty
 
Levers_Aligned said:
I do disagree, Nutty. In almost thirty years of continuous service I have monitored change from without and within. Sure, today's Jack and Split are different creatures, but they have the same belief systems that the 'old navy' had. Yes, it may be modified. Yes, they listen to their iPods, don't like the music you liked and wear 'product' on their hair. From what I remember, that is what they used to call Brylcreem, isn't it? Everyone bangs on about 'pink and fluffy' these days without stopping to examine what the **** that implies. Regulations come and go...they stopped giving people the lash before we were all sailors, yet the Roll On The Rodney generation still broke the rules, went over the wall and returned for more. It's all about evolution. That is the human element. Change is another aspect, and that is a physical phenomenon, brought about by too much management swappage and great ideas club barbeques. But the human side of it, the core element of the sailor, his selfish, benevolent, loving, hating, fighting, ******* principles have nevere changed, and never will, no matter how much counselling, stress management, political correctness and other such dogshit the lords and masters can inject into the bloodstream.

I've heard it said that the navy died when the tot stopped. I've also heard that about many other milestones...the end of the Falklands, the Strategic Defence Review, Wrens At Sea, the victory of Duncan Lustig Prean and the legalisation of homosexuality in the forces. Quite simply it is bollocks. We remain matelots, everything mentioned above and proud of it. Time may change what we look like, but it doesn't change who we are.

Levers

Despite having been out for 30 years now I am sure you are right. I served with guys who had been through the war and they were of course saying that it wasn't the same as when they joined, it has always been like that.

Peter
 

dt018a9667

War Hero
Nutty said:
THE DEMISE OF JACK TAR.

The traditional male sailor was not defined by his looks. He was defined by his attitude; his name was Jack Tar.He was a happy go lucky sort of a bloke; he took the good times with the bad. He didn't cry victimisation, bastardisation, discrimination or for his mum when things didn't go his way. He took responsibility for his own, sometimes, self-destructive actions.He loved a laugh at anything or anybody. Rank, gender, race, creed or behaviour, it didn't matter to Jack, he would take the piss out of anyone, including himself. If someone took it out of him he didn't get offended; it was a natural part of life. If he offended someone else, so be it. Free from many of the rules of polite society, Jack's manners were somewhat rough.His ability to swear was legendary. He would stand up for his mates. Jack was extravagant with his support to those he thought needed it. He may have been right or wrong, but that didn’t' t matter. Jack's mate was one of the luckiest people alive.Jack loved women. He loved to chase them to the ends of the earth and sometimes he even caught one. (Less often than he would have you believe though) His tales of the chase and its conclusion win or lose, is the stuff of legends.Jack's favourite drink was beer, and he could drink it like a fish. His actions when inebriated would, on occasion, land him in trouble. But, he took it on the chin, did his punishment and then went and did it all again.Jack loved his job. He took an immense pride in what he did. His radar was always the best in the fleet. His engines always worked better than anyone else's. His eyes could spot a contact before anyone else’s and shoot at it first. It was a matter of personal pride. Jack was the consummate professional when he was at work and sober. He was a bit like a mischievous child. He had a gleam in his eye and a larger than life outlook.He was as rough as guts. You had to be pig headed and thick skinned to survive. He worked hard and played hard. His masters tut-tutted at some of his more exuberant expressions of joie de vivre, and the occasional bout of number 9’s or stoppage let him know where his limits were.The late 20th Century and on has seen the demise of Jack. The workplace no longer echoes with ribald comment and bawdy tales. Someone is sure to take offence. Where as, those stories of daring do and ingenuity in the face of adversity, usually whilst pissed, lack the audacity of the past. A wicked sense of humour is now a liability, rather than a necessity. Jack has been socially engineered out of existence. What was once normal is now offensive. Denting someone else’s over inflated opinion of their own self worth is now a crime.

And so a culture dies

Unless you serving Sprogs can tell us different?

Nutty



Oh for the old times when life was simple
 

silverfox

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Nutty

3 years ago I was the XO in a 42 off the coast of Iraq with a Ship's Company of whom 90% were at sea for the first time in their current rate, and having just manned up after refit, all the youngsters were in their very first draft - a true baptism of fire.

Almost without exception, and there will always be the odd OD and skate from both our eras, I found them to be as enjoyable to work with as they were when I had my first ship as a mid. I had minimal EO/PC incidents and the sense of humour and fun certainly kept me on my toes. I think the difference nowadays is that the outside world's perception of the Navy has changed and therefore Jack and Jill don't know themselves how valuable they are and what a difficult but worthwhile job they do. It is only when you get alongside and the local RNA or other such bunch of worthies get hold of them that they get a little injection of self esteem.

Any changes in attitude etc that we see are, unfortunately, a product of society as a whole. Incidentally I am now in a Joint HQ and you think we have snags - I've seen modern squaddies.....
 

Geoff_Wessex

Lantern Swinger
Splendid to hear all that, Silverfox. Sadly, there are many of us on here who left in the 80s, pre-females at sea, pre-end of Cold War. We don't get much contact with the modern navy, don't understand the new organisations, uniforms, conditions of service etc. I know there used to be an RN Presentation Team who went around talking to invited ex-officers, but some of us (not officers) are just as interested in the navy and many have done even longer service.

I'd really like to know how the organisation - particularly communications - works at sea (and ashore) now and just can't see through the fog of MOD PR and dodgy 'TV documentaries'. I was a CRS on a 42 and my radio equipment was old even for 1988 (ICS2 for those interested). Before I left the RN (1991) I heard things about 'SAMHADS' and 'DMPS' - automated MCOs, really, but never saw how it operated for real, or how the manpower was tasked. Now I gather that the RS/CY position is covered by one person and I have loads of questions about RN comms and the latest training methods etc - after 25 years you don't just switch off and as I also had stints in Training Design, I'd love to know more. I suppose the best method would be to collar an RO (if I can recognise one) at Navy Days - any other suggestions
 

silverfox

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Geoff - where does one start. in a nutshell we went from Ts and Gs to OM(C)s via cross trained guys as part of Warfare Branch development (designed to man the 23s) Now the wheel has turned full circle and we are back with a sort of WEM replacement - although being out here in BiH means my experience is limited. I'm sure someone better qualified than I can help - or the RN website itself. As far as comms, well in my 42 we had a 1024K modem (bit of an upgrade from a CDMA...) and could do all the stuff that the CVS of which I was GWO(C) could do a mere 5 years earlier. The CVS' took CLX to sea and we achieved that miracle of a paperless signal dist - apart from CO of course - my CCY would have fallen on his highlighter and we would have had to prise the COs signal board from the fingers of his cold dead hand... For the latest info I suggest getting in touch with the Comms training section which is now part of the Maritime Warfare School in HMS COLLINGWOOD.
 

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