"A New Approach To Royal Naval Reserve Officer Initial Naval Training"

Uncle_Albert

War Hero
Interesting to see the new chaps fiddling around with rifles. One of the things I've always liked about the RNR is that it's quite possible to go decades without ever having to weapons train. I recall a few years ago there were rumours that everyone would have to be qualified, but that died a quick death. Presumably there's not the time on the RNR BRNC course to become qualified, so I can only imagine this is more of an introductory familiarisation lesson.

Does anyone happen to know of the intent with regards to weapons training in the RNR? I expect it'll be business as usual (i.e. branches that need it doing it, branches that don't not, and a half-day and a handful of rounds for those not qualified who are mobilising somewhere interesting*), but with the current push to radically increase the size of the RNR, maybe that's going to change again.

* Yes, I'm taking the piss somewhat - I've no idea what weapons training people unqualified who are being mobilised to interesting places get.
 
The current, and well thought out plan, is for every JR to conduct a 1 week basic rifle course, and a 1 week "sea safe sailor" course. Thus, in future years, when called upon to go somewhere that requires the ability to be fully weapon trained, the basic, very basic, skills will have already been taught. This does seem to make sense, as Force Protection is an increasing issue, and we, as a military service, should be able to do this ourselves, without having to rely on Royal, or the Army. The RAF have this approach for many years now. Once the basic course has been completed, unless the branch requires you to be fully trained in he rifle, there will be no need to remain in date etc.
im sure many people can pick holes in this policy, but at least it is well thought out, with sound reasoning.
Standing by to be corrected by many incoming posts
:)
 

CmdKeen

Lantern Swinger
The reason for the rifle course at BRNC is to allow you to go to Okehampton with the regulars in the second week. They go down to Raleigh now for a week of NMT100, whereas the RNR course do up to the WHT along with everything else in week 1 at the college.

You don't get shown how to clean the weapon though. Which makes for an interesting experience after the blank firing fun and games. The rifle is mainly there for lugging around for a full week, and then holding over your head when someone inevitably leaves it loafing. The fire and manoeuvre is too enjoyable and will probably be canned in favour of something less pleasurable.

There is talk of running an RNR type MARL pre-fleetboard which would potentially involve more weapons stuff again.
 

Bisley

War Hero
Core maritime skills will meen you will need to be in date for a wht as per crab air etc not sure if the rnr will follow this but should do ad all one happy family :angel8:"

Or will the finest fighting branch in the girl guides try to big themselves up as the only ones in the rnr to play with there weapons:clap:
 

Uncle_Albert

War Hero
Core maritime skills will meen you will need to be in date for a wht as per crab air etc
Despite the clue in the name, I suspect the majority of the RNR have no need for core maritime skills[SUP]1[/SUP], or at least no need to stay current beyond an initial familiarisation.

[SUB]1. I am taking "core maritime skills" to mean being able to do something useful on a vessel directly related to that vessel, rather than, for example, being part of an HQ or some such which is located on a vessel for convenience. Everyone obviously does need to know how to not be a hazard to the vessel and crew whilst on board and how to conduct oneself in an emergency.[/SUB]
 

Bisley

War Hero
Despite the clue in the name, I suspect the majority of the RNR have no need for core maritime skills[SUP]1[/SUP], or at least no need to stay current beyond an initial familiarisation.

[SUB]1. I am taking "core maritime skills" to mean being able to do something useful on a vessel directly related to that vessel, rather than, for example, being part of an HQ or some such which is located on a vessel for convenience. Everyone obviously does need to know how to not be a hazard to the vessel and crew whilst on board and how to conduct oneself in an emergency.[/SUB]
This is the problem with the RNR you can't pick and choose what you want to follow. CMS are not
choice of the RNR it is obligatory training as dictated by the RN.
 

Uncle_Albert

War Hero
This is the problem with the RNR you can't pick and choose what you want to follow. CMS are not
choice of the RNR it is obligatory training as dictated by the RN.
Heard it before. Like that time it was decided everyone in the RNR should know how to operate a rifle. That died a swift death.

Are you saying the problem is that they can't pick and choose (i.e. you're saying they should be able to pick and choose), or are you saying the problem is that they want to pick and choose?
 
Last edited:

Purple_twiglet

War Hero
Moderator
The problem is to my own mind that for years the RNR quietly did its own thing for RNR Officer Training - until the 1980s RNR Officers didnt even do BRNC. Then BRNC became a very soft 2 week course where the first week was about loafing with the odd lecture, a mild spot of leadership on the following week with a dumbed down ACE and a sense that the college neither knew, nor cared about what the RNR was or what it could do to help.

Current approach seems more enlightened and certainly more rigorous, and if it helps create a better part time officer then that works for me. The aim should be to install a set of values and ethos that lets a junior officer know what it means to dig deep and work hard when tired.

Will this work in the medium term - possibly, although it may be better to focus on why so many officers resign so quickly after fleet board, and try to improve retention there, otherwise this will have been for nought.
 

Green_and_Blue

Badgeman
There are 200 more photos of this course on the RNR Facebook page. (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.221371898003733.1073741825.204165829724340&type=3)

I am interested in learning a few more details about the RNR Officers courses. I know that the TA Officers now have to complete all the modules done by their regular brothers/sisters with the exception of military history, AT and PT (which they are expected to do on their own time to pass the tests). This is under the "One Army" concept, with more and more TA officers deploying very soon after commission requiring the same standards as those who have just spend a year at RMAS.
 
This is under the "One Army" concept, with more and more TA officers deploying very soon after commission requiring the same standards as those who have just spend a year at RMAS.
I know this is heresy, but if they can genuinely achieve that, then what exactly is the point of RMAS? If all this rebalancing works as intended we'd be better off (read cheaper) with an ROTC structure like the yanks, pulling through the chaps while they do their degrees and then kicking them out into the army at the end of it all tooled up and ready to go. Of course, it wouldn't work for BRNC (can't be a naval officer without prolonged exposure to floor polish, paintings of battleships, and the SGR bar), but we could close Sandhurst, and probably Cranwell on that basis...

*removes tongue from cheek and runs for cover*
 

MotleyBlue

Badgeman
Ah the SGR bar, pint of numbers please wierd sodexo man who cant tie a tie! The RNR at BRNC course is still rubbish, they do there assesemnet on BLD which is a prcatice for the RN going through and then commision on the basis of that. Its a very easy 2 weeks for them, stick them through ABLE instead at least then its one hurdle all naval officers have to overcome. I like the way the TA are doing it now, no one deployed out there can be told they havent been through the same as every other officer, that is the best way.
 

CmdKeen

Lantern Swinger
The point of the CLM assessment is to see how you function as a leader whilst physically exhausted, because that reveals your true character. It isn't a test of "how far can you go with a bergan on your back" or any physical limits. Given the regulars have a fairly high attrition rate from ABLE and 7(ish?) full time weeks to physically prepare individuals for it surely as long as reservists are hanging out during their CLM assessments that is what matters.

Plus these days the RNR version of BLD is much harder than the regular one, given the full timers have taken to carrying daysacks rather than bergans around that circuit.
 

jockpopeye

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
Have they started issuing RNR uniforms from Save the Children?

Seriously, look at this ******, did he borrow that jacket off his Dad?
One of my mates recently did the new two weeks at Dartmouth, I reckon that he lost about a stone and a half, ended up with the same look as they are measured for their ones early and then pushed pretty hard for the fortnight.

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 

wave_dodger

MIA
Book Reviewer
Losing 1.5 stone in 14 days is more likely to be the result of a medical issue as opposed to weight loss through exercise - did you count his limbs when he got back?
 

jockpopeye

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
I did not weigh him. Perhaps we should all estimate the weight loss of the fellow in the picture and the most pedantic of us can try to contact him for the definative figure.

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
soleil DefPro: "Royal Navy And Royal Air Force Agreed Approach to Carrier Jets" The Fleet Air Arm 2
MoD_RSS A secondary school’s approach to adjusting the curriculum for use in school and at home MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Helping develop an approach around senior clinicians’ pensions MoD News 0
MoD_RSS A mixed approach to remote education at a primary school MoD News 0
MoD_RSS UK Government publishes its approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol MoD News 0
MoD_RSS AAIB Report: Boeing 737-86N, unstable approach and loss of altitude on go around MoD News 0
MoD_RSS COVID-19: CMA approach to merger assessments MoD News 0
MoD_RSS UK calls for ‘long term’ approach to prepare for future pandemics at World Bank meeting MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Ambassador to Ireland discusses differences in the UK and Irish approach to tackling coronavirus MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Regulator responds to Coronavirus impacts with changes to regulatory approach MoD News 0
MoD_RSS COVID-19: CMA approach to essential business cooperation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Reducing serious youth violence: our approach MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Cross-government approach promised to tackle drug misuse following independent review MoD News 0
MoD_RSS RWM sets out approach to evaluating sites for a GDF MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Approach to casework during the pre-election period MoD News 0
MoD_RSS HS2 Ltd's approach to ancient woodlands during the Oakervee Review MoD News 0
MoD_RSS A holistic approach to supporting peace and security in Africa MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Hackney Council’s approach to moving to a cloud-first model from the PSN MoD News 0
MoD_RSS MOD unveils transformed approach to innovation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS AAIB report: Boeing 737-4Q8, Partial loss of electrical power on approach MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Phase 4 of a whole systems approach to obesity MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Phases 5 and 6 of a whole systems approach to obesity MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Phase 1 of a whole systems approach to obesity MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Phase 3 of a whole systems approach to obesity MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Phase 2 of whole-systems approach to obesity MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New approach to engaging rough sleeping and homeless community MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Justice secretary urges evidence-led approach to cut crime MoD News 0
MoD_RSS UK approach to the prevention of mass atrocities MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Civil news: remember to use streamlined approach to family work MoD News 0
MoD_RSS ‘Education must continue internationalist approach’, Gibb at G7 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Changing the approach to IVMS implementation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: New Justice Minister sets out whole system approach to justice reform MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Cyber innovation at the forefront of UK’s approach to modern warfare MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Intimidation in Public Life: a joint approach to tackling intimidation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: UK's approach to antimicrobial resistance gets UN recognition MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: An inspection of the Home Office’s approach to Illegal Working MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Environment Agency Chair calls for new approach to flood and coastal resilience MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Speech: Phil Beach CBE - A regulated approach to EQA MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: RSH refines its regulatory approach MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: New standards set out YJB's child first approach MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: HMRC outlines phased approach for Entry Summary Declarations MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Amber Rudd sets out fresh approach to Universal Credit MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Speech: "Whole of UN" approach in West Africa MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: Chief Medical Officer calls for unified approach to revolutionise health by 2040 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Timpson says a locally-driven approach needed to rejuvenate high streets MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Homes England proposes new approach to development at Lodge Hill MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Homes England proposes new approach to development at Lodge Hill MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: Updated approach to assessing applications from organisations promoting complementary and alternative therapies MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Pioneering new approach to assessing pupils with complex disabilities to be introduced in schools MoD News 0
soleil Times: "Ruthless approach to spending needed" Current Affairs 15
Similar threads


















































New Posts

Top