A Levels or Equivalents

#1
I am wanting to join logistics as possibly an officer but I really don't want to stay and do A Levels at school could I do some college course equivalent. I am at GCSE stage and have decided that school isn't really for me.
 

slim

War Hero
#2
Be very careful when taking "Equivelents" many colleges will convince you that their courses equate to A levels however their are even more employers who will not accept them as such.
Stick to "A" levels, you can do them at colleges of further education which are far more relaxed than schools
 

rebbonk

Lantern Swinger
Book Reviewer
#4
Be very careful when taking "Equivelents" many colleges will convince you that their courses equate to A levels however their are even more employers who will not accept them as such.
Stick to "A" levels, you can do them at colleges of further education which are far more relaxed than schools
That is very sound advice.
 
#6
Applicants for Logistics Officer need to offer 72 UCAS Points (in addition to their GCSEs) for A Levels taken after January 2017 (180 Points for A Levels gained before 2017). Some specific qualifications can be offered as UCAS equivalents eg Irish Leaving Certificate, European Baccalaureate (EB), International Baccalaureate (IB), BTEC Certificate (Distinction, Merit (at level 3)) and BTEC Diploma (Merit, Merit, Merit (at level 3)), but you would still be better off with A Levels.

Which subjects are your best subjects?

Is there a particular reason why you don't want to stay on at school to do A Levels?

(Line referring to UCAS Points edited to reflect Chalk_bosun's observation further down the page.)
 
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#7
I just really don't like being in full time education that's why I wanted to maybe go college as I got a mate at college and he goes 3 days a week and the course sounds fun. I would enjoy a more hands on experience. The only subjects I really enjoy are History and RE. I still need to see how I do in my GCSES first as I would a pass in English and maths.
 
#8
I'm wondering whether you could also consider joining as a Rating, Mr B. There is a route to Officer from within the Royal Navy; it's not a given, but it can be done. If you feel really resistant to the idea of being in full time education at the moment, you might be happier applying as a Rating.

Which subject is your friend doing which sounds fun?
 
#9
I'm wondering whether you could also consider joining as a Rating, Mr B. There is a route to Officer from within the Royal Navy; it's not a given, but it can be done. If you feel really resistant to the idea of being in full time education at the moment, you might be happier applying as a Rating.

Which subject is your friend doing which sounds fun?
He is doing Uniformed Public Services. I was thinking of going Rating and do like the sound of it I don't really know. I have spent hours on the RN website trying to find a role rating mainly. I was originally thinking going MA, bit I went off that I was going to go for MWS and then AET but I am finding it hard to find the right job.
 
#10
Colleges of Further Eduction normally treat their students in a more mature manner than schools.
However this means that to do well you need to study in a more mature fashion, ensuring that bothe coursework and assignments are carried out correctly.
May I ask what GCSE you attained and at what level?
 
#11
Colleges of Further Eduction normally treat their students in a more mature manner than schools.
However this means that to do well you need to study in a more mature fashion, ensuring that bothe coursework and assignments are carried out correctly.
May I ask what GCSE you attained and at what level?
Still haven't done my GCSE'S yet but I am doing French, History, RE, Business and the all the core subjects.
 
#12
Please note the UCAS tariff changed in 2017.

For Logistics / Warfare officers:

'If you take your A-levels after the start of 2017, you need 72 UCAS points, including two non-overlapping subject areas
If you take your GCSEs after the start of 2017, you need 5 at grades 9 – 4, including English Language and Maths."

72 UCAS points is equivalent to DDD at A-level.

What are your target grades in maths/English and your top 3 other subjects?

If you're saying you prefer something a bit more "hands on" then rating is probably your best bet, and would mean you don't need A-levels.

If you're still keen to do the Public Services, then you could join the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) while you're at college and get an idea whether naval life is for you. However, I'm not sure how applicable Public Services is to other jobs - you may want to choose a course that will give you more options if you later decide not to join the RN.

In any case, go and talk to your local Armed Forces Careers Office (AFCO) who will be able to give you much more detailed advice and help you narrow down what role(s) would fit you best.

Good luck with your GCSEs.
 
#13
Please note the UCAS tariff changed in 2017.

For Logistics / Warfare officers:

'If you take your A-levels after the start of 2017, you need 72 UCAS points, including two non-overlapping subject areas
If you take your GCSEs after the start of 2017, you need 5 at grades 9 – 4, including English Language and Maths."

72 UCAS points is equivalent to DDD at A-level.

What are your target grades in maths/English and your top 3 other subjects?

If you're saying you prefer something a bit more "hands on" then rating is probably your best bet, and would mean you don't need A-levels.

If you're still keen to do the Public Services, then you could join the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) while you're at college and get an idea whether naval life is for you. However, I'm not sure how applicable Public Services is to other jobs - you may want to choose a course that will give you more options if you later decide not to join the RN.

In any case, go and talk to your local Armed Forces Careers Office (AFCO) who will be able to give you much more detailed advice and help you narrow down what role(s) would fit you best.

Good luck with your GCSEs.
Thanks a lot for all the replies they really have helped a lot I will find time for the AFCO in the near future and see how I do in my GCSE'S but rating does seem like a good idea.
 
#14
It's worth having a look at the examples given for the RT, the test all applicants sit, Mr B; how you score in that will determine which jobs are offered to you. It stands to reason that anyone going for an Engineering Technician job will need to reach a certain level of competence in the Mechanical Comprehension section, so bear that in mind if you are looking at AET.

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/career...practise-for-rt-test/mechanical-comprehension

It's probably a good idea to send in a simple application of interest via the website at this point. There's no obligation, but it allows you to start the very first stages of an application. Obviously, how you get on will depend on your RT and passing the medical, fitness test etc.
 
#15
I’ll start by saying I’m an engineer not a loggie, but I would reiterate Sol’s point about considering a Rating role instead.

I’ve just spent 2 years on the staff at Raleigh and listened to many trainee pussers dripping about the amount of study they’re doing. As an Officer, once out of Dartmouth you are pretty much back into full time education, albeit with a bit of sea training thrown in.

As Sol says, there is a route (although not guaranteed) to Officer later as either a UY OR SUY.

At 16 I was very much of the same mindset as you. The idea of staying in the classroom didn’t appeal so I started an engineering apprenticeship instead - which I then sacked off to join the RN as a mechanic. As I got older I felt more ready to take up education again, doing ‘tiffs course at 30 and commissioning at 40. Joining as a mechanic gave me the mix of hands on with some academic stuff that I wanted at 18, and commissioning later meant I was ready to put in the academic work needed for that role.
 
#16
Thanks for the link I didn't do amazing with 37% on Numeracy and Mechanical Comprehension 50% on reasoning and 67% on the verbal one.
 
#17
Thanks for the link I didn't do amazing with 37% on Numeracy and Mechanical Comprehension 50% on reasoning and 67% on the verbal one.
Plenty of time to brush up on the areas you found more difficult, though. You can work on those areas and then you will be at your best when you take the test. Make a special effort with the numeracy.

On reflection, I am wondering whether the best thing for you might be something like the course your friend is doing while you work your way through a Rating application, working on the areas you might find more difficult in the test and getting your fitness up to the right level.

Get advice from all sorts of people in the meantime, though, so that you make the best decision for you.

I think that it would be worthwhile seeking out your nearest Royal Navy Careers Advisors and calling in for a chat. They might be able to suggest jobs which will appeal to you and which you've missed on the website.

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/careers/joining/get-in-contact
 
#18
Plenty of time to brush up on the areas you found more difficult, though. You can work on those areas and then you will be at your best when you take the test. Make a special effort with the numeracy.

On reflection, I am wondering whether the best thing for you might be something like the course your friend is doing while you work your way through a Rating application, working on the areas you might find more difficult in the test and getting your fitness up to the right level.

Get advice from all sorts of people in the meantime, though, so that you make the best decision for you.

I think that it would be worthwhile seeking out your nearest Royal Navy Careers Advisors and calling in for a chat. They might be able to suggest jobs which will appeal to you and which you've missed on the website.

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/careers/joining/get-in-contact
Found my nearest office and will pop in soon Thanks for all the help everyone has given me.
 

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