A History of Royal Naval Air Traffic Control

Pierre_Argh

Lantern Swinger
#1
With the 100th Anniversary of Maritime Aviation approaching next year (2009)I am currently compiling a history of Royal Naval Air Traffic Control. Whilst, of course, ATC doesn't itself date back to 1909 this seemed an appropriate time to collect memories and recollections from those who have worked onboard aircraft carriers, ships and naval airstations.

Anyone interested, or who feels they may have something to contribute, is invited to PM me. Thanks

PA
 
#3
My fav shore draft and the only shore draft where I wasn't on a course was working in the Ops Room of the Tower at Culdrose back 2001.
 
#4
Pierre_Argh said:
With the 100th Anniversary of Maritime Aviation approaching next year (2009)I am currently compiling a history of Royal Naval Air Traffic Control. Whilst, of course, ATC doesn't itself date back to 1909 this seemed an appropriate time to collect memories and recollections from those who have worked onboard aircraft carriers, ships and naval airstations.

Anyone interested, or who feels they may have something to contribute, is invited to PM me. Thanks

PA
Please contact The FAAOA.
One or more of their old and bold membership will possibly be able to help.
www. [email protected]
 

Pierre_Argh

Lantern Swinger
#8
Longbar - I have written to FAAOA - but still waiting an answer (they only publish newsletters twice a year, and then after publishing you'd have to wait for individuals to respond) -

Which is why I was "hoping" to get some info from RumRation members rather than pointers where to go. (I can Google like the best of them)

C'mon guys give us your dits... even about the last 10yrs, its still history.
 
#11
I'd guess you know this already but the quarterly Naval Review, founded in 1912, contains a wealth of personal reminiscences and articles describing historical milestones. Archived editions are available online as PDF files here. There is no overall index or search facility but each issue contains an index in the first few pages.

I rather like this extract from a dissertation on Air Power at the beginning of the May issue of Volume I (link):

...Knowing that we want our machines to carry out a reconnaissance of this kind, we are now in a position to consider how they are to be handled. There would appear to be three methods from which to choose.

Firstly, we could send our machine from, say Harwich, allow it to hydroplane across the North Sea at high speed, and on arrival off the opposite coast to flush down the petrol not required for aerial flight, and carry out the necessary reconnaissance. On completion of this, she might, or might not be able to again reach England with her information, as her radius of action would be such as to make a successful landfall uncertain, and dependent upon the direction and strength of the wind.

In any case her first objective should be a ship, so that her information could at once be imparted to the commander-in-chief by wireless, and whatever ship she met should be capable of completing the machine with fuel so as to enable her to return home. The better scheme, however, would be for that ship to be capable of accommodating the machine, so that the crew, who would have been at considerable discomfort and nervous tension for about nine hours, could obtain a much-needed rest.

Another scheme would be to build special parent ships for their accommodation, and to send such ships as far towards the coast line as possible, arranging a rendezvous for the machine after the reconnaissance had been completed. The probability of the machine again finding her parent ship, however, would not be very great, as navigation for some years will be difficult, and there will always be the chance of the parent ship being driven from her position...
 
#13
Happy New Yr Pierre. Any snippets from the VL Museum and do you still have access to the individual Westland books that contained the dits of the 70s and 80s?
 

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